Jaymul

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About Jaymul

  • Rank
    Rebel
  • Birthday 11/05/1983

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    UK

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    warrior

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  1. Jaymul

    The Training Yard: Where We Get Our Learn On

    My gym has 5 or so Eleiko training bars but the condition varies significantly. Two are under three months old and are relatively pristine, mainly because the weightlifters at the gym guard them like their children. Anoter one is in reasonable condition but looks a bit beaten up. Perfectly usable though. The two others though... One barely spins and if you end up having to use it, you can say goodnight to any kind of turnover in the clean and snatch. The other is interesting because it APPEARS to spin frine but in actual fact something is broken inside the bar and the two sides spin ant different speeds. This has the effect of one side rising above the other which makes racking cleans really quite challenging. For some reason it tends to be fine for snatches.
  2. Jaymul

    The Mead Hall: The Warrior Water Cooler

    I'm an NTJ, on the cusp of E and I. So Theodon or Elrond.
  3. Jaymul

    The Training Yard: Where We Get Our Learn On

    I recently got a 13mm Inzer lever belt purely for squatting, at the recommendation of my coach. At 13mm, it's not competition legal for weightlifting, nor is the design of the belt favourable for cleaning anyway, but for squatting it really can't be beat. It offers such immense trunk support.
  4. Jaymul

    The Training Yard: Where We Get Our Learn On

    Just checked your numbers/experience in your challenge - you should definitely be good to make a 1RM attempt. Good luck!
  5. Jaymul

    The Training Yard: Where We Get Our Learn On

    Most coaches would recommend against trying to find a 1RM for beginners during the course of initial linear progress and especially very early on. The reason for this is that your strength is increasing so rapidly that any max you set is all but meaningless - you'll be able to do more next session and more again after that. With this in mind, you can use one of the various 1 rep max calculators to give you a projected 1RM (for most men 1RM is usually about 10-15% of 5RM, for women it is often a lower percentage than this as women are better able to handle volume at higher intensities than most men). I've found these to be fairly accurate in the past and it gives you a good sense for what you're theoretically capable of at any given time without actually having to test it. If you are determined to do a 1RM test regardless, work up to a single for your current 5RM with 3 or 4 warm-up sets. This weight will be about 85% of your projected 1RM. For the first warm-up, do a set of five, for the second, do a set of three, after that cut to singles. Take 3 minutes or so to rest between these sets. After the single with your 5RM weight, rest for 5 minutes or so. What you do next is up to you but if you're not experienced with max testing I would play it conservative and go for halfway between 5RM and projected 1RM (92.5% pr so), then rest as long as you need to and attempt the 100% if you feel good. If you make the rep, take small jumps and see how far you can go (I usually do 5kg/10lbs but depending on your numbers, 2.5kg/5lbs might be more appropriate). If you make a rep and feel like there's no chance you'll get the next one, just leave it there - as a novice you're improving so fast that you'll hit that weight in no time anyway.
  6. Jaymul

    The Training Yard: Where We Get Our Learn On

    jdanger, was wondering if I could get your opinion on something. Today I missed a PR attempt 3 times in exactly the same way on the Snatch. Unfortunately I don't have video so hopefully my description is sufficient. The first pull was good, positions were fine, I fully extended but not overly so, I got under the bar just fine, timing was good, bar was in the right place on the catch. But when catching the bar, my chest fell forward and I lost the bar in front. Every single time. My coach was totally happy with everything up to this point and actually said after the third rep "I don't know how you keep missing this weight because you're doing almost everything right". He doesn't think it's a strength or flexibility issue and thinks that it may be a confidence thing or just not enough practice with 90%+ weights. For what it's worth I hit my current PR and 5kg below that just fine immediately before these attempts. Any suggestions for what might be causing this or how to improve it? We were thinking Snatch balances at close to maximal weights and sitting at the bottom for a bit. Reasoning for choosing this rather than something like paused OH squats is to get me more confident about catching a moving weight and making sure positions are right all through the exercise.
  7. Jaymul

    The Training Yard: Where We Get Our Learn On

    This is the Pendlay article with his training system. There are some follow-ups about individualising it but the base two-week block he recommends. When going to 4 days he pretty much recommends just adding some power cleans/snatches/jerks and doing it as a lighter day. http://www.pendlay.com/A-Training-System-for-Beginning-Olympic-Weightlifters_df_90.html Your 4-day variant looks a lot more manageable to me! I hadn't seen the Takano program before, he uses some pretty idiosyncratic notation!
  8. Jaymul

    The Training Yard: Where We Get Our Learn On

    Personally I think it's too much per session on Days 1 and 2. Take W1D1 for example. After 15 snatches from the floor at 70% and 20 fairly heavy snatch pulls, you're going to be fatigued as hell come your power snatches and they are less likely to be quality reps. Similarly W1D2 - power cleans after 15 cleans, 20 clean pulls and 15 front squats (not including warm-up volume)? You're gonna be toast and the workouts are going to be really, really long. My current programming as set by my coach is typically 4 lifts and two quick accessory exercises and including warm-up, I'm in the gym a good 2.5 to 3 hours. I also think you need to back squat more, unless there's some reason you are specifically avoiding back squatting If you really want to stick to 3 days a week, I recommend either checking out Glenn Pendlay's Training System for Beginning Weightlifters which will have you doing a snatch variation, clean variation, overhead work and a squat movement each day. Back squat day 1 and 3, front squat day 2 (or the other way round if you want to emphasise the front squat). You shouldn't need to program the overhead squat unless you have a specific issue to address. Alternatively, Greg Everett's 4-day beginner program is a good bet if you don't mind 4 days in the gym. It might also be a better candidate for compressing down to 3 days. (I don't know your experience level so apologies for recommending a "beginner's" program if you're not a beginner but both of these have all the essentials).
  9. Jaymul

    The Mead Hall: The Warrior Water Cooler

    I won't be doing this challenge as it doesn't really fit with the way I'm training at the moment but I thought I'd pop in to say hi and wish good luck to all of those about to embark on their own challenges. I may throw my hat back in the ring for the New Year challenge as I'm likely to be trying to lean out while preserving strength which seems more aligned with the challenge mentality. In the meantime, I'll continue to duke it out in my battle log while checking out everyone's threads
  10. Jaymul

    The Training Yard: Where We Get Our Learn On

    If you're concerned about knee problems, maybe I can reassure you a little. My family has a history of knee issues too and my dad tore both of his ACLs and ruptured cartilage in his left knee in his 20s. I have my own track record of knee problems - I've blown out the medial collateral ligament in my left knee on two occassions, first in 2005 when doing ju-jitsu and then again in late 2010 when I slipped and fell on an icy path. The second time around was much worse - I damaged the meniscus where the ligament attaches to the bone and had some cartilage damage. I couldn't walk unaided for 6 weeks, couldn't walk without a limp for more than 12 weeks. Kept having repeat minor ligament strains throughout 2011 and early 2012 where any lateral motion on my lower leg would do funky stuff to the ligament. I was incredibly nervous about starting to squat because of this but spoke to a competent physician well-versed in sports injuries who recommended that I give it a shot to see how I got on - and to go below parallel if I could. A year and a bit later and I'm closing in on squatting twice my bodyweight, am doing the Olympic lifts three times a week and my knee has never been stronger or healthier. Squats have saved me from a lifetime of niggling knee issues and reduced mobility.