Akari

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About Akari

  • Rank
    Revolter
  • Birthday 12/27/1990

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  • Location
    Germany

Class

  • Class
    rebel

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  1. Everyone is welcome how did you like the book?
  2. Cue: Coming home from work at 16:30. Change into running clothes nd the new running watch. Routine: Go running or at least walking. Reward: Enjoy the sun and relax.
  3. Monkey Tamers United Hey Monkey Tamers! @fitnessgurl@Wobbegong@MaD MaLKaV@Shello@Judge@Xyndjrn Hey everyone, I started this thread 2 months ago and failed the most. I thought about not doing a challenge this month but now I decided to buy a running watch for some motivation. I had depression and anxiety and was home for almost 3 months and not working. The depression and the anxiety are (almost) gone. But I did fall back into bad habits: Eating too much, not going out into the sun, just sitting home watching Netflix. In two months I write my exam and I avoid learning for it. It's really imortant for me to pass it because I want to leave the company where I do my apprenticeship. It took me a lot of courage to go back into this company and now I am going crazy because of boredom. My boss refuses to give me other tasks besides cooking coffee and filing away papers. this company was once the reason for anxiety and depression. It won't be a second time. The Power of Habit I really can recommend everybody to read "The Power of Habit" by Charles Duhigg. For those who don't want to read the whole book here is a short summary. Building new habits is harder than to change old habits. To explain changing old habits I use an example from the book: 1. Identify the routine (the behaviour you want to change) Imagine you work in an office. Each afternoon you stand up, go to the cafeteria, by a cookie, talk with colleagues, then go back to work. You feel good after talking to colleagues while eating your cookie. Then you feel bad. You got already some pounds but you can't stop yourself. You even ignore the post-it at your desk: No more cookies! 2. Isolate the cue (the trigger of the habit) need for a break, hunger, need for social contact, boredom...? 3. Reward cookie, distracting, socializing, a burst of energy because of sugar...? 4. Make a plan In Duhiggs case it was the following: Cue: around 3:30 in the afternoon Routine: going to the cafeteria and eat a cookie Reward: social contact Plan: Set an alarm, go to a friends desk and talk for 10 min. He felt better ending the day after talking to a friend. Spreadsheet to track our habits. 1 - you committed to your habit 0 - you failed Don't worry if you fail sometimes. Don't feel bad about it. Don't be angry at yourself. At the end, you will beat the monkey that distracts you from your good habit 1. Post you cue, your routine (the habit you want to build) and your reward 2. Commit to your habit and track it.
  4. Always this bug, can't write afte i tagged one. It's absolutly true. I have really trouble getting past this starting point. Not just with habits but in general with tasks I don't like. At work I get often stupid tasks. Sometimes I feel embarassed because of the nonsense. So I avoid doing it. It really helps to imagine the next step and to set an appointment.
  5. Akari

    [Rebel Pilot Gar] Someday

    Earl Grey and Darjeeling are my favorites. May I ask which garmin do you have? I am searching for a running eatch but can't decide which to take.
  6. Monkey Tamers United Hey Monkey Tamers! @fitnessgurl@Wobbegong@MaD MaLKaV@Shello@Judge@Xyndjrn Let's do another Challenge! New people are always welcome I coppied this from last time: The Power of Habit I really can recommend everybody to read "The Power of Habit" by Charles Duhigg. For those who don't want to read the whole book here is a short summary. Building new habits is harder than to change old habits. To explain changing old habits I use an example from the book: 1. Identify the routine (the behaviour you want to change) Imagine you work in an office. Each afternoon you stand up, go to the cafeteria, by a cookie, talk with colleagues, then go back to work. You feel good after talking to colleagues while eating your cookie. Then you feel bad. You got already some pounds but you can't stop yourself. You even ignore the post-it at your desk: No more cookies! 2. Isolate the cue (the trigger of the habit) need for a break, hunger, need for social contact, boredom...? 3. Reward cookie, distracting, socializing, a burst of energy because of sugar...? 4. Make a plan In Duhiggs case it was the following: Cue: around 3:30 in the afternoon Routine: going to the cafeteria and eat a cookie Reward: social contact Plan: Set an alarm, go to a friends desk and talk for 10 min. He felt better ending the day after talking to a friend. Spreadsheet to track our habits. 1 - you committed to your habit 0 - you failed Don't worry if you fail sometimes. Don't feel bad about it. Don't be angry at yourself. At the end, you will beat the monkey that distracts you from your good habit 1. Post you cue, your routine (the habit you want to build) and your reward 2. Commit to your habit and track it. I wish everyone much success. And if someone needs advice then post your question or pm me.