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Zaethe

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Posts posted by Zaethe

  1. 5 minutes ago, Quickie said:

     

    That sounds interesting, I am just wondering about how you freeze and reheat them. Do you take them out of the muffin tin and wrap them in tinfoil before freezing them and reheat them on a plate with the foil still on? Those questions seem pretty silly maybe, but I'm just not that much into cooking ^^

     

    Wait for them to cool first, is the golden rule of all freezing, then yes just wrap them in foil and freeze them as is.

     

    Unless you want to set things on fire though, I wouldn't recommend ever putting foil in the microwave.  Unwrap them first.  But yes on a plate is just fine!

    • Like 2
  2. Muffin tin omelettes are my go-to for easy breakfast.  Grease a muffin tin, throw all your omelette fixin's in, add your egg, top with a little cheese and some parsley as desired, throw it in the oven for about 20 minutes at 180c (350-ish f), done.  Bakes in batches, freezes well and reheats in the microwave in about 30 seconds.

     

    Good luck with your challenge!  Lots of positive improvements!

    • Like 3
  3. My Dad has been an ass about many things over the last few years, it was almost impossible to get him to acknowledge that the issues I have were real until I went to the specialist and got my diagnosis.  

     

    Now I just learned that he's making gluten free devil's food cake (from a box) for me for my birthday, because I'm allergic to wheat.  I'm going to ignore that it contains milk and soy, which I'm also allergic to, because he's made a huge effort that's very unlike him.  This makes me inordinately happy.

    • Like 3
  4. Here for all the stable plan goodness!  I've been bullet journalling for a couple of years, considered just getting a diary this year for having everything already drawn out for me, but I just can't give up my bujo.  

     

    How bad is the smoke over that way still, calming down any?  

    • Like 2
  5. A new year approaches

     

    giphy.gif

     

    time for a do-over.

     

     

    The big plan for 2020 is to start making my life work for me, instead of just kind of floating by with occasional surprises when something goes the way I hope it will.  I'm very good at the passive apathy thing.

     

    So no big preamble, just straight into it.  There are lists.  It's going to be longer than I expect anyway.  

     

    Morning Routine

    Things I need to establish in my morning routine this challenge.

     

    • Wake up time (8am)
    • Get out of bed (asap, not two hours later)
    • Make bed
    • Eat breakfast

     

    Night Routine

    Things I need to establish in my night routine this challenge

     

    • Shower
    • Wash face & moisturise
    • Take meds
    • Bed time (10pm)
    • No phone after bedtime

     

    Cleaning List

    House things that need to be done in order to establish a cleaning routine

     

    • Dishes
    • Wipe down counters
    • Sweep/mop kitchen
    • Clean stovetop
    • Unpack and organise CDs
    • Clear trash from living room
    • Vacuum living room
    • Vacuum spare room
    • Clear trash from bathroom
    • Wipe down surfaces
    • Clean shower walls
    • Sweep/mop bathroom
    • Clean toilet
    • Clear trash from bedroom
    • Rearrange bedroom furniture
    • Vacuum bedroom
    • Do laundry

     

    Food and Eating

    Things I need to do to get my eating settled

     

    • Establish a food budget
    • Establish a meal plan that avoids all my allergies
    • Establish a regular shopping list

    This will be done by the 1st, after that it will be as simple as eat the meal plan.

     

     

     

    By the end of this challenge, the goal is to have all of these things crossed off as established.  A routine point counts as established if I repeat the point consistently for three weeks.  Long time yes, but I know what I'm like, takes a while to drum things into my skull.

     

    This is all simple stuff that I need to incorporate into my daily life in order to build some foundations to work with.  I have a terrible habit of zero-ing in on a single point and saying "Well I can't do anything until I get this addressed" as a reason to do nothing.  The current one is physiotherapy.  But I'm not currently even on the list for the clinic doc wants to refer me to, because she's waiting to hear from the specialist.  And then there's no saying how long that waiting list will be.  My life doesn't go on hold while I do this, it's living itself out without me.  I turn 32 on new year's eve, and I can't say I've got as much as I would like to show for it.

     

    Also, since it is my birthday on new year's eve, I'm kicking off my challenge on the 1st.  Because birthdays are birthdays.  And I know my Dad is baking a cake.  It's his first time baking.  I'm gonna eat the shit out of that cake.

    • Like 6
  6. Technically it's the 29th here.  In that it's just past midnight and some tremendous fuckknuckle in the building is playing music so loud I can almost figure out what the actual song is.  

     

    This has been a weird challenge.  I kind of expected it to be, if I'm honest.  It devolved from having goals to just and random vent thread during the holiday season.  

     

    My water intake HAS gone up, which is a big improvement.  Cleaning and purposeful movement kinda fell off a few days before Christmas and just never really came back.  These things happen.

     

    The intent next year is to actually move forwards.  I've been quietly devising a K.I.S.S gameplan, now all that's left really is the execution of said gameplan.  Which is sort of going on kind of right now, especially on the eating front, but it's more a case of finances than actual purpose.  The purpose part begins on the first.  One of the unexpected upsides of being born on the 31st of December is that your new year really has that fresh start vibe.

    • Like 3
  7. 8 hours ago, fleaball said:

    Is there any way you can use talk to text on your computer to save your hands? I use Siri on my phone sometimes when I’m lazy, but idk what computers offer as far as built-in programs vs something you’d have to buy. 

     

    I absolutely would, if I could get it to work on my phone.  Every time I look for the little microphone button it isn't there.  Really need to sit down and do some hard googling

    • Like 2
  8. On 12/24/2019 at 3:33 AM, Manarelle said:

     

    I know everything costs extraneous money, but have you looked into light-touch or soft-touch keyboards? I had a logitech keyboard at one point where the buttons were very shallow and sensitive - you didn't have to push as much to get them to register. There was also a Mac keyboard, I think it was low profile or something, that you barely had to touch the keys. Might be worth looking into to allow you to keep typing. 

     

    My chromebook keyboard is softtouch, doesn't take much at all.  My fingers are janky enough that even touchscreens are a problem on worst days.  I really need the splints to keep my little joints at the tops of my fingers from just flopping backwards the moment pressure is applied

    • Like 2
  9. I think number one on the list of things I'm struggling to accept is that my hands are getting worse.  Finger splints should help a great deal but if they don't help all my joints in my fingers then I'm still screwed, because it's the tiny ones at the top that are the worst for bending back so much they burn with pain.  And it's not something I can fix much, there's not really any muscle there to strengthen.  My ligaments are just too weak to hold my fingertips when any pressure is applied.  I can type for a while before I need a break, but writing by hand has become quite problematic.  I was trying to make a list of things I need to get done in 2020 and yeah, no, I didn't get all that far.  Disheartening, for sure.  I love to write and be creative with my hands.

    • Sad 2
  10. 7 hours ago, fleaball said:

    Gotcha. I figured with your dad there and your mom having been in the UK it might be something like that. 
     

    Makes sense that you wouldn’t go back under those circumstances. I mostly asked because I know some people who move away from somewhere think moving back indicates failure and I was ready to convince you otherwise if that were the case. 

     

    Yeah nah, the country just makes me miserable.  Now that I'm out of it in 40c (104f) degree weather I sometimes get nostalgia for wintertime, but then I realise that the nostalgia I'm actually getting is for the romanticised wintertime you see on tv, and that I loathe the cold with a passion :P 

     

    3 hours ago, Whisper said:

     

    I am happy to hear that you do not feel obligated to keep a close relationship with someone that is toxic just because they happen to be a parent. Far to many people seem to have trouble with this for themselves, or assume that everyone's parents were/are as healthy and functional as theirs. That isn't necessarily the case, and you need to feel free to decide for yourself if this is a relationship that helps or hinders you, without dealing with other people's expectations. 

     

    Spoiler because I feel weird putting a personal story in someone else's thread...

      Reveal hidden contents

    I was estranged from my mother for about 7 years (she never called me back, I stopped reaching out, took her that long to call me). We were in contact again for less than a year before her repeated violations of my boundaries caused me to tell her to stop contacting me again. "Have you come to terms with God for making you a monster" was just a bit too much.

     

    My father, after it came to light that he was living in a foreclosed trailer with no power or water, discovered a dark conspiracy on the part of my siblings, his brother and I to provide him with food and shelter, decided to cut the family off with an "I'm going back to my trailer to live or freeze or starve and I don't care which." Good times, good times... 

     

     

    Yeah no, I cut contact with my mother for years upon years because I just couldn't cope with her.  I'm an old hand at cutting out toxicity these days, I don't permit it room to fester wherever possible.

     

    Sorry about your folks.  It's a rough go of it, hopefully you're in a better place now.

     

    3 hours ago, Whisper said:

    BBC keeps telling me that Australia is engulfed in flames and hitting a massive heatwave; stay safe and stay hydrated. Hope you can get some rest. 

     

    Yeah I'm west coast so we're not quite as on fire as the east coast is, though there have been two large fires within 10 minute drives from my place in the last week or so.  I'm looking after myself best I can :) 

    • Like 3
  11. Just now, fleaball said:

    Jesus. You and medical professionals don't really have a good track record, do you? 

     

    Also, question. Based on past posts it sounds like you're British and moved to Australia. Money issues aside, is there any reason to stay in Australia vs going back to the UK? Seems like they're both enough of a shitshow at this point (so is the US, no judgment) that it doesn't make that big a difference, but maybe the NHS might not suck as much as the healthcare system you're dealing with now? This is entirely based on what I know from the internet so if I'm way off base I apologize.

     

    Mental and emotional health wise I'm better off here.  Healthcare is a bit of a toss up but for the most part it does it's job okay.  I don't do well in England, lots of bad memories, bad weather and about five figures worth of debt I'm hiding from :P  

     

    If it were just the healthcare issue you're right, I'd be better off in the UK.  But I'd also be trapped in near-inescapable poverty and would probably end up right back in the pit I was in mental health wise before I got on a plane.  

    • Like 3
  12. 1 minute ago, fleaball said:

    Not trying to rain on the parade here, but based on the reading I've been doing about narcissists over the past 2 years, I'm pretty sure they never go away. You can try to cut him out by blocking his number and shutting down people he sends your way to do his bidding, but they don't really disappear on their own.

     

    Also these seems obvious but look specifically for a trauma specialist when you get to that point. I had two other therapists in the past (one great, one not so much but she was my first therapist so I didn't know better) and the responses and advice I'm getting from my current therapist to the same things I told the others in the past are wildly different and much more helpful because she understands the context. 

     

    Yeah...I figure he's not going away but also he's just so self absorbed that if I don't stay in touch I won't hear from him for a couple of weeks before he realises, so I can make that work for me.

     

    I feel this on therapists so hard.  I didn't realise that's what the issue was but my first therapist actually misdiagnosed cptsd as borderline personality, and put me onto an antipsychotic that caused me to gain 200lbs with alarming rapidity.  I had some good sessions with a trauma therapist a few years after and then I promptly up and moved to a country where I can get 5 therapy sessions a year on medicare before I need to pay 400+ an hour, and I don't have private insurance.

    • Wow 1
  13. 1 minute ago, Defining said:

    Feel free to tell me off if I'm asking questions that are too personal, but have they ruled out sleep apnea and/or sleep disordered breathing?

     

    Also, the obvious/boring stuff like avoiding caffeine & other stimulants, avoiding alcohol (though apparently marijuana can help sleep? huh), and staying hydrated are helpful, though I imagine that you've covered a lot of that when working on your sleep hygiene.

     

    The timing of when you eat can also have some impact; for example, eating within an hour of waking up with a larger breakfast that has ~25g+ of protein can 'kick start' energy levels for some folks. Also, erring towards 'carbs in the morning, fats in the evening' can help for some. Not sure re: the allergies, but I do know that if you eat right before sleeping, digestion can affect your sleep quality as well, so if at all possible it's best to stop eating at least an hour or two before bed.

     

    Nah you're fine, but yeah there's no sleep disorder there beyond restless leg syndrome.  Sleep trials are...interesting.

     

    My big issue with sleeping at night is the joint pain.  The nutshell version is that my connective tissue isn't strong enough to hold everything in place, so I expend a ton of energy holding myself together throughout the day, and then when I try to relax to sleep I'm not holding everything in place, so things tend to....go on adventures.  Tonight my toes don't want to stay where they're supposed to be, neither do my kneecaps.  Physiotherapy to help me establish a stronger core is the primary plan for that, as well as medication (which I can't afford to fill the prescription for just yet, so that one's on me)  my big concern is just the energy levels.  I can't currently do anything about the amount of energy I'm expending, so my alternative is to try and boost my energy intake, and maximize that within a decent calorie budget, so I'm not eating like 6000cal a day :P  

     

    That's interesting because I don't generally eat breakfast.  I'll have to give that one a try and see what happens.  I can't drink because of some of my meds, so I'm good on that front at least!  And yeah marijuana is good for sleep!  If I could afford it I'd sleep a whole lot better, I've done that one in the past.

    • Like 1
  14. 2 hours ago, Harriet said:

    Hey, I've had trouble with fatigue for about twenty years, but I don't have fibromyalgia or any concrete diagnosis. Just fatigue (and depression). I can say I feel worse when I eat a lot of junk, especially refined carbs. I feel moderately better on less processed, home-cooked diet, but not vastly improved. I've recently switched to a paleo-ish diet (no dairy or gluten, but some legumes and occasional tofu; mostly meat, fish, eggs, veg, fruit and beans, plus dried beef liver tablets, some fermented foods and vitamin D). Powerlifting helped moderately, as did walking and martial arts. Fixing my sleep helped a bit. Not drinking alcohol helps a bit.

    So yeah, there was no magic bullet for me. The biggest thing was lifting. But I started from a very, very sedentary starting point, so if you're already active it probably won't do the same for you. Paleo-ish also hasn't cured me yet, but I've only been doing it for a month or so. If, theoretically, my fatigue were partially due to deficiencies or inflammation, I might expect it to take longer. 

     

    Could the "tiger blood" people talk about with restrictive diets actually be adrenaline or some energising mild stress from calorie restriction? Or do you suspect it's something more sustainable? 

     

    Yeah my big problem is that with my diagnosis, high or even moderate activity levels are a general no-go for quite some time, if ever.  So I'm going to see primary benefits to tackling the fatigue through dietary changes.

     

    Tiger blood is a whole30 specific thing, they're referring to the sudden uptake of energy once the sugar and refined foods have detoxed out of the system, so it's not really a sustainable thing no.  Just something I'd heard about :P 

     

    1 minute ago, Defining said:

    I experience significantly different energy levels depending on my protein intake; generally if I drop below 0.8g/lb of bodyweight, I really start to feel it. I also find that I feel better when I regularly eat berries (usually frozen), but that could easily be psychosomatic. Fasting can often exacerbate poor sleep quality. As Harriet mentioned, regular exercise definitely has the potential to help, as does limiting added sugars in your diet. If you're looking for some 'data backed' (I use the term loosely for nutritional sciences) ideas: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5434800/

     

    It's also not a bad idea to get some tests done (if you live in a part of the world where that won't bankrupt you) to rule out any specific hormonal/chemical challenges that could be causing that kind of extreme fatigue. Falling asleep at the kitchen table and sleeping 11+hrs/night is enough of an impact on your daily life that I'd be chatting with a doctor, just in case. You might also look at a sleep clinic to rule out stuff like sleep apnea (which would DEFINITELY impact your sleep quality, but you might not realise) or other underlying conditions that can affect sleep.

     

     

    The chronic fatigue is a side diagnosis/co-morbidity to my g-hsd (generalised hypermobility spectrum disorder).  We've covered the bases on it and the general consensus of GP + specialist is "just see what happens" which is always the best thing.

     

    The fasting could be an issue, I have a tendency to only really eat once, maybe twice a day.  I also have allergies that I've shown no actual histamine response to, so haven't bothered cutting them out of my diet.  After reading that link (very informative!)  it might be worth just straight up going the full haul and doing an elimination diet, seeing what helps and what hinders.

  15. I'm pretty sure I'm not the only one here with it!

     

    I struggle to fall asleep because of joint pains, but once I'm out I sleep about 11 hours a day.  And maintaining sleep hygiene only does so much.  I've become that guy who can fall asleep anywhere.  I fell asleep at the dining table at the end of a meal with family a couple of weeks ago, and that is not a comfy place to be.

     

    So folkeronis, are there any nutritional "plans" you've found that help with fatigue?  I've heard some rumors about keto, and I've heard about the tiger blood phase of whole30, but nothing more solid than that. 

    • Like 2
  16. 4 hours ago, Manarelle said:

     

    Dude that's awesome that you get to test things and find something that works for you so inexpensively. Glad you finally got a diagnosis, and I'm also rooting that it can be managed and maybe lessened now. 

     

    Also, sorry to hear you have to deal with narcissist parent(s?). It took me decades to realize that was my mom's issue and it wasn't me being f**ked up. Still hurts that I can't have a normal parent/child relationship and will never get the support needed, but at least I can stop internalizing it. Sounds like you've got a couple people you can turn to as a support network though. 100% agree with Whisper that it's reasonable not to open yourself to further pain with the family until you're ready.  /hugs

     

    There isn't a whole lot that can be done, but I'm gonna try everything I can and see what happens.

     

    One narcissist, the other was just toxic, but she's passed now so it's not a present concern.  Though I do need to talk to my doc about a referral to a therapist for the metric fuckload of trauma that's left me with.  My dad and I didn't connect until I was 29, so we don't have that familial bond in a lot of ways, and he cares far too much about himself for me to ever take any kind of priority in his life unless it suits his purposes and directly benefits him.

     

    *hug* thanks.  Honestly I'm probably gonna start pulling away from my dad a bit this coming year, because the narcissism is getting to be too much for me emotionally.  I already have enough baggage without adding to it.  So if he decides to cut me out of his life for it.  No major loss. 

    • Like 2
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