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Garris

Getting closer to my goal weight..but when do I start eating for muscle

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Roamer   

That's some impressive progress you've made there! I can relate well to having trouble losing weight. I'm almost certain it is my diet but I dunno. Best thing you can do is keep doing what you've been doing and try doing more. My advice on what to actually do? Try to incorporate more strength training and don't focus so much on calories. I've always been told a good diet will give you the right nutrients to perform, but a diet based around calories is just a recipe for giving up. Again, I may not be the best person to be giving that advice, but I never focus on calories, only on content. Strength training I've been told burns fat, and is the key to improving strength (duh lol).

 

Hope that helped some. lol

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Garris   
1 hour ago, Roamer said:

That's some impressive progress you've made there! I can relate well to having trouble losing weight. I'm almost certain it is my diet but I dunno. Best thing you can do is keep doing what you've been doing and try doing more. My advice on what to actually do? Try to incorporate more strength training and don't focus so much on calories. I've always been told a good diet will give you the right nutrients to perform, but a diet based around calories is just a recipe for giving up. Again, I may not be the best person to be giving that advice, but I never focus on calories, only on content. Strength training I've been told burns fat, and is the key to improving strength (duh lol).

 

Hope that helped some. lol

 

Thanks for the reply.

 

For my life situation(work,kids,commute) I get in about 40-60mins 3 times a week which is about max what I can do.

 

Im working on making the most out of my time while working out.

 

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Defining   
On 2017-08-11 at 4:56 PM, PaulG said:

A reverse diet would not be necessary for this. Garris hasn't stalled, and nothing is showing that his TDEE isn't stable already.

I've understood reverse dieting as a stabilising measure, rather than corrective. And an interesting idea to explore as one approaches their goal weight, IMO. ;) https://www.muscleforlife.com/reverse-diet/

 

It's always just theory though, we each need to figure out what works best for us as individuals. :D

 

 

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PaulG   
On 8/12/2017 at 9:15 PM, Defining said:

I've understood reverse dieting as a stabilising measure, rather than corrective. And an interesting idea to explore as one approaches their goal weight, IMO.  https://www.muscleforlife.com/reverse-diet/

 

It's always just theory though, we each need to figure out what works best for us as individuals.

 

 

 

I was around (and paying attention) when the concept of reverse dieting first surfaced. It's never been a sound idea. It originally meant something slightly different, though.

 

It was an idea originally floated by Layne Norton due to some issues he was having with personal training clients, particularly pro swimsuit contest clients (pro bodybuilder-level women). These clients were complaining that they ate a ridiculously low-cal diet -- 8-900 calories a day -- and did hours of cardio daily, and yet they claimed they were not losing weight. Norton shared that the only method he'd tried with these clients that worked was slowly increasing calories (on the order of 5-20 calories per week, a very slow ramp-up) and that they slowly, seemingly by magic, began losing weight again. One other salient point: Norton's communication with these clients was largely or wholly by email, so he was neither able to personally observe or control these problems.

 

Because of this, he put forward the idea of "metabolic damage": that his clients' metabolisms had been somehow downshifted to the point that their TDEE was literally less than 800 calories, and that extremely slow ramp-ups of calories would be required to fix them.

 

This was a somewhat unusual and incendiary position to take, mainly because a 100% weight loss stall when eating so few calories is not demonstrably possible. It's also not hard to see that Norton didn't have good quality data for his ideas -- emails with competition clients who seem obsessed with scale numbers are not good people to draw any conclusions from, particularly when their complaints are as mundane as a stall under extreme deficit conditions.

 

However, based on your article link, it looks like reverse dieting has taken on a new meaning. It's an idea that is actually older than Norton's ideas: it's the theory that if you don't ramp up your calories after a period of weight loss, you'll gain some or all of your weight back.

 

Though it's not quite as crazy as Norton's ideas -- your TDEE can and does ramp down over time after a long and/or severe deficit -- the ramp-up method is overkill. It may be useful for people who use TDEE calculators and don't track their own data very well; their idea of their TDEE will be old and possibly inaccurate. But anyone tracking themselves properly can find their own, current, TDEE simply by comparing their intake over the last couple weeks against their lbs of fat lost. It's simple math, and if you track it over time, you can literally watch your TDEE rise and fall with the diet.

 

If you know your most recent TDEE, it's far easier (and faster) simply to bump your calories up to that TDEE when you're done -- no need to ramp up. People don't gain fat simply by raising cals back to TDEE; in fact, most people will have their TDEE readjust after a week or so and find themselves losing small amounts of weight again.

 

This doesn't mean the scale won't sometimes do odd things. When you raise cals to maintenance, cortisol levels will rise, which will cause changes in the amount of water weight you retain. You may shed some water if your deficit has caused you to retain water (people often read that as a "stall" on the scale, though it is not a failure to lose fat, only water retention). Then over time, if you continue to strength train, your water weight will rise again as your muscles start storing more glycogen. Sometimes this can be a big change, on the order of 5-10 lbs. However, anyone watching closely will see that their waist measurement barely moves at all throughout these fluctuations -- a sure sign that fat is not actually being gained or lost.

 

Ramp-ups are sometimes a good idea (when bulking), but not necessary for controlling metabolism when you're at maintenance or below.

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