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Boresnore

Eating healthy makes me sick!

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Hi!

I am new here. But I have a bit of an issue. When I try to eat healthy I get sick. I usually get really bad nausea that lasts all day. 

For example, I made a salad today for lunch and I have felt like puking since. It has been nine hours. I couldn't even eat the lentil soup I made for dinner. My boyfriend had pizza so I had a piece and immediately felt better but still feel kind of off. 

I buy mountains of healthy groceries with the best intentions and then  they make me so sick I cannot eat them. I don't exercise either because I feel so bad. This has been a big obstacle for me when trying to lose weight. I have gained a lot in the past few months in part because I try to get started and feel so sick I give up. 

 

Any suggestions on what to do or what might be my issue? 

 

Thanks!

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If you're like me, you forgot to wash the salad.

 

There can be a nasty transition phase depending on how you're diet looked up to now. (Compare to the Simpsons, when everyone except for Lisa gets sick from eating vegetables.) You may need to ease into it a bit more softly; replacing one "bad" meal by a "good" one once every one or two weeks; working on secondary things like drinking soda, etc.

 

But the only real advice is: Go see a doctor if it is really as bad as it sounds.

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A few things that might be going on: 

  • Food prep hygiene as Akura points out
    • Not washing veggies (veggies are often grown in manure, which is a fancy word for livestock poop. It works as a great fertilizer and helps the plants grow, but poop contains a lot of bacteria that can make you really sick if you're not careful - so it's generally best to make sure to wash the veggies thoroughly. This is also why people who are immunosuppressed, like cancer patients, can't have anything raw, because you can't wash veggies to total sterility - the only way to sterilize veggies is to cook them)
    • Not inspecting veggies to make sure they're fresh before you cook them.
      • If you don't know how to spot rotten produce, here's a quick primer: if you see any slimy spots, or fuzzy spots that are different in color from the rest of the fruit or veg, or if the fruit or veg is normally firm and is now mushy, that's all signs of rot and the veggie in question should be thrown out. Don't assume that because something is sold at the supermarket, it will be good to eat - I very often find rotten produce at the market. It's one of those 'let the buyer beware' scenarios. Also, if it smells bad, is attracting fruit flies, or tastes funny, it's probably rotten and you shouldn't eat it.
  • Adjustment phase as Akura points out
  • Some undiagnosed food intolerance or food allergy (in which case, see a doctor)
  • Some undiagnosed medical condition, such as Crohn's or mild gastroparesis (again, see a doctor)
  • Some psychological food aversion (in which case, see a therapist after physical causes and adjustment phase have been ruled out)

When I was adjusting to a healthier lifestyle, I started with small changes. All the changes I've made to my diet have taken me about twelve years - it didn't happen overnight. Small, incremental, manageable changes are the way to go. Along the way, I've discovered I like a lot more vegetables than I ever thought I would have, and that good veggie dishes are all in the preparation - fancy that, if you lightly sauté veggies instead of over cooking to the consistency of leather (the way my mother always did), they actually taste good. Amazingly, if you don't cook bell peppers to mush, they have a nice texture. Spinach is a great filler if you mix it in stuff so you avoid the slimy texture. I could go on here. I've also lost 50lbs and kept it off for 7 years now and become the oldest person in my extended family without some form of lifestyle-associated metabolic disorder (hypoglycemia seems to be genetic in my case - but I don't have T2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, plaque buildup in my arteries, or any of a wide variety of other disorders that run in my family).  And some stuff I still don't like and never will (celery is hatred and misery in vegetable form), but I eat the most varied diet I ever have in my life and am healthier for it. Is my diet perfect? No. I still eat too much salt, and am too prone to late-night snacking, and I tend towards eating the same 4 veggies more meals than not because I can be a bit lazy in food prep. I could also probably eat more grains and less fat.

 

But my point is that learning to eat healthy is a process, not an overnight fix. Don't try to jump straight into having a salad every meal - that's a good way to shock your system and set yourself up for failure. Instead, find a change you can make that's managable, which your system will tolerate. An apple and some cheese is a better snack than a bag of chips, for example. Or a protein bar is better for you than a store-bought candy bar. Something small like that should be your starting point. Once you're used to that, add something else. And so on. Healthy eating is a skill - and you're a beginner. Which is ok - but have realistic expectations of yourself. You're not going to be able to go from your current diet to some fitness model ideal overnight. Set yourself up a plan and phase in changes about once a month - that'll give your body time to adjust.

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Wow! Thanks for the awesome answers. 

I do not wash my vegetables... I will start now. That is something that never really crossed my mind. 

 

Akura, I think you are right about easing in. I also do tend to try to do all or nothing tactics. Which may also be making me sick. 

 

Congrats chemgeek on keeping your weight off for so long. I know the right way to go is small sustainable changes. I am a bit or a perfectionist and have high anxiety so I sabatoge any process I make by pushing myself too hard. I also have to accept things that I cannot seem to eat. Like avocado. I don't mind celery, but I really dislike avocado and always try to eat it because it is considered healthy. 

 

Thanks for the help. I feel much more optimistic now. I think I will just set a small goal every month and try out some patience! 

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Believe me I get you on the perfectionism thing making it harder to eat healthy in a healthy way... perfectionism +obsessive tendencies means for the first 20yrs of my life I basically had "I eat nothing but carrots, mushrooms, and lettuce and sometimes some chicken broth with peas" or "I eat whatever the fuck I feel like or am offered because when I start paying attention to what I eat, I know I go off the deep end and I would rather be fat than starve." Only when I started with incremental changes under the supervision of a registered dietician did I manage to build actually healthy eating habits.

 

(Even now I don't calorie count because calorie counting still lands me in disordered eating land pretty quick. I think it is the numbers because I get weird about numbers in general and have a jerk of a brain).

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I do that exact thing! I go from "I will do this to an impossible standard" to "I give up there are no standards". I am glad it is possible to adjust to a more balanced approach.

 

I cannot count calories either. I always seem to unconsciously try to eat as little as possible when counting, or go over my limit and then give up and eat the whole house for a few days. I don't need that.

 

Right now I think I just need to notice my automatic reactions to things and realize they are a bit out of wack. I judge my worth based of how I measure up to an impossible ideal in my head. No wonder I give up!

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26 minutes ago, Boresnore said:

I do that exact thing! I go from "I will do this to an impossible standard" to "I give up there are no standards". I am glad it is possible to adjust to a more balanced approach.

 

I cannot count calories either. I always seem to unconsciously try to eat as little as possible when counting, or go over my limit and then give up and eat the whole house for a few days. I don't need that.

 

Right now I think I just need to notice my automatic reactions to things and realize they are a bit out of wack. I judge my worth based of how I measure up to an impossible ideal in my head. No wonder I give up!

 

 

A and D sufferer here. You have unrealistically high expectations of your self but when it comes to others you are more forgiving.

 

I have been through some Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and I suggest you look up CBT and list of Distortions.

 

you'll find the most common distortions we view ourselves through.

 

just don't give up and learning to love yourself enough to forgive yourself takes time and dedication just like losing weight!

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A and D sufferer here. You have unrealistically high expectations of your self but when it comes to others you are more forgiving.
 
I have been through some Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and I suggest you look up CBT and list of Distortions.
 
you'll find the most common distortions we view ourselves through.
 
just don't give up and learning to love yourself enough to forgive yourself takes time and dedication just like losing weight!
I tried CBT a couple years ago and did find it very helpful. That is probably something I should get going again!

Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk

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17 minutes ago, Boresnore said:

I tried CBT a couple years ago and did find it very helpful. That is probably something I should get going again!

Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk
 

 

I find CBT couples with mindfulness meditation very helpful.

 

not like hippy one with the universe meditation but just taking 10 mins to focus on breathing and realizing that the voice in your head that tells you all the negative things is just that a voice with no real power and who is really kind of an asshole.

 

if your looking for something to read on the subject I highly reccomend Dan Harris 's 10% Happier : meditation for fidgety skeptics .

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I find CBT couples with mindfulness meditation very helpful.
 
not like hippy one with the universe meditation but just taking 10 mins to focus on breathing and realizing that the voice in your head that tells you all the negative things is just that a voice with no real power and who is really kind of an asshole.
 
if your looking for something to read on the subject I highly reccomend Dan Harris 's 10% Happier : meditation for fidgety skeptics .
I have heard mindfulness is really good for coping with anxiety. Never tried it though! Maybe now is a good time to check it out. Thanks!

Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk

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2 hours ago, Velkyn said:

celexa is good for anxiety and stopping the hamster that seems to occupy my brain when it comes to repeating thoughts. 

 

I'm an Effexor man myself, still suffer though:(

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On ‎8‎/‎16‎/‎2017 at 10:17 PM, Garris said:

 

I'm an Effexor man myself, still suffer though:(

 

keep trying other things.  My husband is very bipolar and it took awhile to get him the right cocktail.  He went through everything from lithium to ah, whatever that stuff is that they also prescribe for epilepsy, to Zoloft, etc.   He's now xyprexa, Wellbutrin and celexa and is pretty content with the effects. 

 

We've also both found kava to be good to take the edge off.  It's a south pacific root that has kavalactones in it and has been used for a very long time for social relaxation.  It doesn't give a stoned, or drunk feeling but it just makes me feel as if my brain isn't always on adrenaline being scared of everything.  I get mine from https://www.kavakingproducts.com/  no association with them, I just like their stuff.  It does tasted like mud, and should be drunk quick and cold. 

Edited by Velkyn
adding info

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On 8/14/2017 at 5:12 AM, Boresnore said:

Hi!

I am new here. But I have a bit of an issue. When I try to eat healthy I get sick. I usually get really bad nausea that lasts all day. 

For example, I made a salad today for lunch and I have felt like puking since. It has been nine hours. I couldn't even eat the lentil soup I made for dinner. My boyfriend had pizza so I had a piece and immediately felt better but still feel kind of off. 

I buy mountains of healthy groceries with the best intentions and then  they make me so sick I cannot eat them. I don't exercise either because I feel so bad. This has been a big obstacle for me when trying to lose weight. I have gained a lot in the past few months in part because I try to get started and feel so sick I give up. 

 

Any suggestions on what to do or what might be my issue? 

 

Thanks!

Oh boy, this is the first time I hear something like this. However, when I was on keto diet a few years ago I had a similar problem with eating fish. I almost puked once. I can only assume what's it like to feel so nauseous after eating salad. :( 

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On 8/14/2017 at 5:12 AM, Boresnore said:

I am new here. But I have a bit of an issue. When I try to eat healthy I get sick. I usually get really bad nausea that lasts all day. 

For example, I made a salad today for lunch and I have felt like puking since. It has been nine hours. I couldn't even eat the lentil soup I made for dinner. My boyfriend had pizza so I had a piece and immediately felt better but still feel kind of off.

 

Hi!

I'd like to emphasize the "go to a doctor" advice. I'm a bit biased because my sister has Crohn's disease, among other issues.

"Healthy" food like salad, lentils, vegetables, contains lots of fibers. Fibers are harder to digest than other kinds of food. That's why people who aren't used at eating them will often get a bit unwell / gassy from it. But such a strong nausea could also mean a more serious issue with your digestive system. Fiber-rich food can reveal serious issues because your digestive system simply isn't well enough to manage them.

If you have such an issue, eating more fiber-rich food is going to make you sicker and might cause real damage. It's a bit like trying to run on a broken leg! It's only healthy if your body can handle it. Those are relatively rare diseases, but they're also pretty serious, so it's better to rule them out as soon as you can. If you don't have any health issues, you can confidently eat more and more fiber foods and get used to them, knowing you're not endangering your health.

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I understand exactly what you are saying... If I pack a lunch that is broccoli and plain chicken breast or a lunch that is "too healthy" I actually get nauseous and would rather just not eat. I have a trigger list that I won't bring to work to eat now lol I also find that adding a bit of cheese or a bit of sauce helps... Packing something that is healthy but that I'm excited for has also helped! For instance I can always eat sweet potato.. hellz yah. Or if I'm having chicken I am marinating the crap out of it and it's going to be delicious!! Or I'll bring a tiny pasta portion and a big ole salad... But if I'm bringing salad there's going to be pears, onions, goat cheese and pecans in it. Or feta, strawberries and grilled chicken. Heck yah! You basically need to find which foods set off the omg this is too healthy nauseous feeling and jazz them up or avoid them lol.

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