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Questions on intermittent fasting (exercise at night, cheat days, anxiety and stress)


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Dear all, today I started a 16/8 fasting eating schedule to lose weight but still have some question I would like to know more about:

 

1-) I work out at night 2x week and in the morning on Saturdays. The night workouts begin 30 min after the fasting period, which means I could eat something 30 min before the workout but nothing afterwards. Is that ok? Any advice? (Seems to me that the people who workout in the morning also don’t eat immediately afterwards, but they eat sooner after the exercise is done)

 

2-) I’m considering having the weekends as “cheat days”, ie, still eat clean but not adhere to 16 hour fast in order to allow for some of my social life (going out for dinner, dates, etc.) . Would this mess up the gains too much? In the past, I’ve learned  that allowing for some social activities was key for me to maintain consistency and even be generally happier. 

 

3) I’ve been working on being less anxious at work, my team mates complain that I’ve been stressed. I am working on that, but do wonder what effects 16/8 fasting could have on anxiety, stress, bad moods, etc. Any info on this? 

 

4) I’ve heard from a nutritionist that fasting could lower your immunity. Any views on that ? Many times I’m sleep deprived due to work and noticed getting sicker a lot.

 

thank you in advance for any insights.

best

P

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You should always include a post workout meal (30mins to an hour afterwards) since your body is craving every nutrient. It's not a bad idea including carbs as well. Unless you're doing keto, then you need to stay mindful of the limitation. 

 

Have a cheat meal, not a cheat day/cheat weekend. What happened to eating sensibly all year round? Fasting - or as I like to call it STARVATION - is silly and difficult to maintain in the long run, because the body acts in the systematic way of self-protection ~ if you don't consume food for a longer period of time, the body itself will reduce consumption and incorporate safety mechanisms, which in turn will extrapolate appetite to what's called "wolf hunger". Occasional fasting is recommended, but starvation as a way of eating habits goes, doesn't have much in common to what you're trying to achieve. 

 

Every symptom you're experiencing is due to your poor diet. At least start with three basic meals a day. 

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On 1/6/2018 at 7:56 PM, Psicodom said:

thank you in advance for any insights.

 

How has it been going?

 

Also, if you haven't read it yet, I recommend reading NF's article on IF. It is a great place to start and can answer some of your questions.

 

On 1/6/2018 at 7:56 PM, Psicodom said:

2-) I’m considering having the weekends as “cheat days”, ie, still eat clean but not adhere to 16 hour fast in order to allow for some of my social life (going out for dinner, dates, etc.) . Would this mess up the gains too much? In the past, I’ve learned  that allowing for some social activities was key for me to maintain consistency and even be generally happier. 

 

Is there a specific reason why you don't have your eating window in the evening? You work out twice at night and mention going out for dinner. It seems like the path of least resistance would be to incorporate these components into your eating habits. 

 

On 1/6/2018 at 7:56 PM, Psicodom said:

4) I’ve heard from a nutritionist that fasting could lower your immunity. Any views on that ? Many times I’m sleep deprived due to work and noticed getting sicker a lot.

 

A quick search of The Google shows that it might, but it hasn't been proven. It appears a study was done using flies that shows a weakened immune response and because the genes were also found in humans, it was extrapolated that it would impact humans in the same way. Other studies show that age factors into the response (where healthy adults do not show any changes, but healthy elderly people do). In my non-professional opinion, if you are sleep deprived and stressed, you can't necessarily determine what the cause is for you - too many variables to confirm a specific reason why. 

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