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Nomad Jay

Studying Aikido and Wing Chun simultaneously?

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I took a few semesters of aikido in college and really enjoyed it. Time-skipping to today, I will have the opportunity to take up aikido again later this year. There is also a wing chun kung fu dojo in the area. I have no background in wing chun but reading up on the art, it interest me and it appears (to the untrained layman) that the two style would complement each other. Thoughts on this from practitioners of either art?

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I mean, if you have the time to do both, nothing wrong with it.  Just accept that you'll likely progress slower in both because your time commitment is split, just as if you wanted to do lifting and rock climbing.  There will likely be overlap, but I also would expect each training to somehow negatively impact the other in some manner (we have a karate person who has been training with us for years, and she still has trouble letting go of that training during practice sometimes).

 

But yea, if you have the time and means, go all at it.

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The style I study (Cuong Nhu) is a mixed style that lists both Wing Chun and Aikido among our 7 styles of influence. In fact, just last night we were working on blocking with Wing Chun straight punches (using the forearm to block an incoming punch while still driving into the centerline with the fist). Later we working on knife self-defense incorporating Aikido techniques like kote gaeshi.

 

All this to say, you’d hardly be the first to combine them, and in fact the combination is foundational to the style I practice.

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I do think its interesting that your taking one art that specializes in large circle takedowns and one that specializes in dominating the centerline, both that have a lot of wrist/arm control.

 

You are your own martial art. Very few "founders" of martial arts only studied only one system, and you are the founder of your own personal system. Name brands don't fight for you. Don't worry about one style being "compatible" with another. That only matters if you are competing in a sport where one system can throw off another. I assume you don't care about care about that from the choices your taking.

 

It seems like your drawn to more esoteric arts (like myself). And that's awesome. Please don't take this as a criticism of Akido or Wing Chun. All Martial Arts are as much about the school and student as the brand, and all brands have their issues. As long as you don't fully buy into the magical thinking that can come with almost all martial arts, you should do fine. If you are going to spend years training, I would encourage you to put yourself in a variety of situations so you can best judge. If your having fun and don't care about how realistic your art applies to real world situations, then disregard below.

 

Branding: I have read Akido practitioners who claim that Akido their opponents energy or weight against them. That's not unique to Akido. I've also seen WIng Chun practitioners claim Wing Chun simultaneously use offense and defense. All striking arts say they do this, and all the ones that have continuous sparring (like boxing) actually do this. I'm not nocking either of those arts, just some of the sales packaging makes them sound like there is a magic solution to combat that doesn't require the hard work or pain that martial sports have.

 

If you care about how effective you are in training, at some point in time in your journey, you should try to expose yourself to the MMA big three (Brazilian Jujitsu, Folk Wrestling and Muay Thai/Dutch Kickboxing). I'm not saying you should take those, but you SHOULD show up for a free class or two, and spar a couple times in a variety of martial sports. You will learn things about your training that may surprise you. Even a one hour basics class is eye opening.

 

Here's why:

Takedowns/Takedown defense for esoteric martial artists: There are many cops and bouncers who use Akido effectively in the real world, because they already have their "Mushin Noshin" when it comes to conflict. If you've never wrestled or bounced or otherwise grappled contested live resisting components in a competitive or real world environment, your going to be missing things that can't be taught in "one step" training style like most (not all) Aikido schools. Note: I'm not saying Akido is ineffective, I'm saying its more effective with people who have a baseline of fighting in a different style. Which is why it was founded that way.

 

Striking: Most Wing Chun schools have the same problem all single style schools have: You learn to fight students in your style. No one else is going to move like a Wing Chun practitioner, so you if you can find a friendly MMA or Boxing gym that will let you pay a mat fee and cross train just to test your learning on people who don't react the way that Wing Chun students do or has sparing rules that are different than your school. Experienced Boxers, Kickboxers, and street brawlers are better at making Wing Chun practical than students who only take Wing Chun alone.

 

Ground fighting: Lastly, ground and pound happens. Most Akido schools train for a six second fight (not all mind you). You should be prepared for a long contested fight on the ground if your awesome Akido maneuver fails and someone ends up on top of you dropping bombs like a school yard bully. I know many martial artists say they don't want to fight on the ground. But you should be prepared to fight in a variety of positions, including the ground.

 

Weapons/Weapons take-always: You probably have that covered in your existing training.

 

 

 

 

 

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On 3/5/2018 at 9:35 AM, MiddleAgeMutantNinjaPanda said:

Ground fighting: Lastly, ground and pound happens. Most Akido schools train for a six second fight (not all mind you). You should be prepared for a long contested fight on the ground if your awesome Akido maneuver fails and someone ends up on top of you dropping bombs like a school yard bully. I know many martial artists say they don't want to fight on the ground. But you should be prepared to fight in a variety of positions, including the ground.

 

I really need to find a way to get this training in at some point.  Possibly when I invent a time machine....

 

Stupid 24 hour days.

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