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Angor

New Out of Shape Muay Thai Student

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I just had my 5th class. It's super fun! However, I'm extremely out of shape. A positive thing, though, it's that I started this to motivate me to exercise, and it's working. There are a couple of things that I'm wanting to do, to get better in my classes:

 

1. Become Staminus Maximus, the god of stamina.

2. Inject Hulk serum into my limbs, to improve my strength.

3. Get better at eating the right things.

 

Any tips for the kinds of exercise I would be doing, and food I should be eating, outside of class? For perspective, I haven't exercise for a full year, before starting Muay Thai.

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Remembering my early years in Judo, I'd recommend making sure you're drinking lots of water.  Do you do a stretching routine at class?  If so, doing that routine daily is a good plan.  Go for walks.  Let yourself get used to class a bit more before adding extra training.  You're likely working on both strength and stamina at class already.   For food, make sure you're eating some veg and good protein.

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Thank you! I don't have a stretching routine. Could you recommend one for me? I've just been doing the basic stretches you do before going for a run.

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Dangit, one of our guild leaders is a blackbelt in TKD who had an awesome stretch routine which would have really applied to MT as well. My search-fu is weak.

 

Tagging @Shotokan, who has used it for his hips to marvelous effect.

 

Anyway, absent that routine, most of your stretching should be focused on active and passive mobility.

  • Active mobility would be using your muscles to move in a certain range of motion. A good example of this would be to put your leg out in as high a roundhouse as you can manage and holding it for time.
  • Passive mobility is what we traditionally refer to as stretching - getting the tendons and ligaments to loosen up. There is a physiological aspect to it in getting the muscles to change, but there's also a mental component, a sort of relaxation that you need to learn and develop and encourage.

So, offhand, the stretches you need the most for MT would probably revolve around getting the hips to open up. These would be the front split and the side split or "pancake" as it's sometimes called. Yoga has a lot of good stuff for this too, like the Forward Fold, Downward Dog, and my personal favorite - Prayer Pose, which is essentially a deep squat with elbows driven into the knees to widen things out.

 

If you're looking for good stretch routines, Gymnastic Bodies and Gold Medal Bodies are two resources that tackle the problem from a gymnastics perspective. I'm presently a big believer in Gymnastic Bodies, as it's really helped me improve my range of motion and just generally feel better, but they're both good, and it's worth noting that GMB is specifically run by martial artists looking to integrate gymnastics and mobility into practice.

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Hi, 

 

When it's only your 5th training session, I think just regular attendance will be very beneficial.  It'll get you used to the training. You can also talk to your coach and ask him or her for some tips. In the end, they'll have more influence on your training than any one of us.  

 

What kind of equipment do you have access to? For increased stamina I like to shadowbox and jump rope.  Those don't really take an equipment except for a jump rope and even that you can just pretend to jump rope I guess.  If you have access to a partner, practice checking kicks. Developing an eye for that is going to go a long way in your training.  You can also hold pads for each other if you have access to that.  

 

For increasing strength, adopting a strength training regiment would be great. Again, this could be limited to the equipment that you have access to. I'm sure our strength brothers and sisters over in the Fighter's Guild could probably find something for you. StrongLifts is a popular program.  

 

Hope this helps and good luck.

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Thank you, @leglocker! I've thought about jump rope. They have us start with that, at the beginning of class, so it would be good to get to a point where I'm not out of breath after. Good tip!

 

Shadowboxing would be good too, though I don't feel I've learned enough things to make it useful yet. I hope to get a heavy bag, someday, but I don't have any space where I live....yet! *Throws out piano*

 

I'll bug our Fighter Friends for strength training tips.

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55 minutes ago, Angor said:

Would picking up running be useful for stamina and cardio training? Or would jump rope be better? Or both?

 

Well... so... it kind of depends on what you'd go in for. They'd both technically be useful, and running is a classic form of conditioning for fighters, but it's worth pointing out that it's high-impact and is practically guaranteed to mess up your joints if you do it long enough.

 

Skipping rope is also good, and has the added benefit of training you to be light on your feet and to coordinate your hands and feet together.

 

One possibility may be to combine the two - to get good at skipping rope, and then to go for a ruck, which is essentially a loaded walk. You take a backpack, fill it up with some weight, and then walk as fast as you can whilst being able to breathe through your nose. This is a good article that I've used to learn the skill. And the cool thing is, you'd only have to do it once a week.

 

Otherwise, like @leglocker said. Best way to get the conditioning for the thing you want to do is to do the thing you want to do often. And while you do want to get strong, you don't want to go so far down that rabbit hole that you compromise your recovery and your ability to practice. I've used this program as a template for my own strength training, and even as someone who does kickboxing/karate rather than BJJ it's helped me a lot. I pulled something due to negligence in the lifts, but once I'm healed I'll be doing this more at the speed he recommends, ie his set and rep recommendations rather than trying to kill myself on it. It doesn't look like much, but if you practice MT often and watch your recovery, it'll be plenty.

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Seconding @Kishi's recommendations. Skipping rope is a self-limiting exercise; you're unlikely to hurt yourself doing it, while running is not (unless you've spent considerable time developing the skill). Jump rope and shadowbox a little bit every day. Then go for an easy ruck 1-2 times a week, conversation pace, 30-90 minutes. The cardio should increase your work capacity and allow you to recover quicker, which in turn builds a bigger base for more training later.

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1 hour ago, Kishi said:

Well... so... it kind of depends on what you'd go in for. They'd both technically be useful, and running is a classic form of conditioning for fighters, but it's worth pointing out that it's high-impact and is practically guaranteed to mess up your joints if you do it long enough.

 

Wow, seriously? I didn't know running could do that to you. Thanks for the insight and the links!

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1 minute ago, Machete said:

Seconding @Kishi's recommendations. Skipping rope is a self-limiting exercise; you're unlikely to hurt yourself doing it, while running is not (unless you've spent considerable time developing the skill). Jump rope and shadowbox a little bit every day. Then go for an easy ruck 1-2 times a week, conversation pace, 30-90 minutes. The cardio should increase your work capacity and allow you to recover quicker, which in turn builds a bigger base for more training later.

 

The general idea I'm getting is that I don't want to push too hard, mainly focus on building up stamina in what I'll be doing in MT, and go slow, steady, and forward.

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On 3/10/2018 at 2:27 PM, Kishi said:

Dangit, one of our guild leaders is a blackbelt in TKD who had an awesome stretch routine which would have really applied to MT as well. My search-fu is weak.

 

Tagging @Shotokan, who has used it for his hips to marvelous effect.

Angor, welcome to the very addicting thing we call Martial Arts.

 

The routine that @Kishi is referring is what I called Cheechoe's awesome hip routine.  Although it is more focused around kicking, it really helps open up the hips and gets the lower body warmed up while strengthening the legs and hips in a very controlled way. It really is awesome and it helped my kicks and hips a great deal.

 

 

 

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11 hours ago, Angor said:

 

Wow, seriously? I didn't know running could do that to you. Thanks for the insight and the links!

As far as I know, the idea is that running is high impact and can damage your joints. This is more for running on pavement. I could also recommend using an elliptical which is low impact and some can actually be pretty fun. 

 

14 hours ago, Angor said:

Shadowboxing would be good too, though I don't feel I've learned enough things to make it useful yet. 

If you know how to throw a jab, you know enough. If you're a total noob throwing kicks, this could be an excellent opportunity to throw some kicks and kick out of the awkwardness of kicking. 

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8 hours ago, leglocker said:

If you know how to throw a jab, you know enough. If you're a total noob throwing kicks, this could be an excellent opportunity to throw some kicks and kick out of the awkwardness of kicking.

Okay. So do I just practice things I've learned, different combos, that kind of thing? It seems so intuitive to see someone do it, but when I think about doing it, I really don't have any idea.

 

Also, how much force should go into each hit? Especially with kicks, I feel like I would make myself twirl and lose my balance.

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1 minute ago, Angor said:

Okay. So do I just practice things I've learned, different combos, that kind of thing? It seems so intuitive to see someone do it, but when I think about doing it, I really don't have any idea.

 

Also, how much force should go into each hit? Especially with kicks, I feel like I would make myself twirl and lose my balance.

Pretty much. You don't have to put everything into your strikes. Twirling is normal when throwing like round kicks. That's your momentum. If you're losing your balance, doing this will improve that balance.  Think of it as a more serious version of when you were a kid and you were playing X-Men throwing out combinations. This will actually help with your fluidity in the movements as well.

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For future reference, does anyone know where to get a MT heavy bag, and a stand, for NOT 3 arms and 2 legs? Also, is it safe to keep them outdoors if I cover it up when not in use?

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