• Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

TakingTheWheel

Rotator Cuff Issues Brewing?

Recommended Posts

Salutations, fellow warriors!

 

I'm roughly six weeks into my weight lifting journey and lately, my right shoulder (the one I assumed was stronger - it's my dominant arm) seems a little grumpy - specifically during chest exercises (flat and incline bench presses). I mentioned elsewhere in these forums that while training my chest, my arms seem to tire and fatigue long before my pecs do. Well, during (and after) my last two workouts, I noticed a general warm "burning" sensation in the front of my right shoulder. It isn't pain, but rather mild discomfort. I still have the full range of motion in that arm/shoulder despite these recent developments and my normal activities (besides working out) seem all but completely unaffected, meaning I can function normally in 99% of my daily life. However, I'm concerned that something is brewing and I'd like to put a stop to it before it becomes anything severe.

 

I've done some research online and determined that I either have a touch of rotator cuff tendonitis or impingement. I don't think it's full blown impingement, though, because there's no sharp or activity limiting pain. However, unless I do something about this issue, I'm worried it could become just that and completely take me out of the gym.

 

I'm prepared to try to rehab this myself by doing some light rotator cuff exercises using rubber resistance tubing/bands. Do you think that will help ease the symptoms and, in a short amount of time, heal whatever is going on with my shoulder? Or, would I simply be making matters worse by continuing to work the joint, even with minimal resistance? Should I just rest my shoulder and lay off my workouts for a few days or a full week and see how I feel?

 

And when I do start feeling better, what are some alternative chest exercises that are shoulder friendly? I'm fairly certain my form (based on my anatomy) is 100% to blame for these early stage shoulder issues. I've already tried modifying my workouts by using lighter weights and/or changing my grip and elbow positions. It's helped quite a bit, but I'm not out of the woods...yet. I'd appreciate some advice on how to not have this minor setback permanently sideline me or my progress. Please help!

 

-Peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm trying to figuere this out myself, been getting the same in my left shoulder, predominantly because of incline bench. I'm really trying to keep my elbows tucked as much a possible across all variants, but I might have to give up incline altogether and go back to overhead press. I'm on a forced 4-6 week layoff due to surgery, the silver lining being that my shoudler has a chance to heal a bit more fully, but figuring this out is one of my focuses when I start back up again.,

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Gainsdalf the Whey said:

I'm trying to figuere this out myself, been getting the same in my left shoulder, predominantly because of incline bench. I'm really trying to keep my elbows tucked as much a possible across all variants, but I might have to give up incline altogether and go back to overhead press. I'm on a forced 4-6 week layoff due to surgery, the silver lining being that my shoudler has a chance to heal a bit more fully, but figuring this out is one of my focuses when I start back up again.,

Thanks for the reply, Gainsdalf. I'm sorry to hear you're dealing with something much more serious than I am. However, it's comforting to know that my shoulder issue is fairly common. It's still troubling, though.

 

I'm going to lay off the flat and incline bench presses for a while and search for alternative chest exercises that don't put nearly as much strain on my shoulders/rotator cuffs. From what I found so far, though, there aren't many. What's frustrating to me is, I wasn't training all that long or hard with those exercises. But this problem became most apparent when I started incorporating the incline bench press into my routine. Perhaps that move just isn't for me? As I mentioned in my initial post, I'm also going to do some light resistance work targeting my rotator cuff muscles specifically to see if that helps (or hurts) matters.

 

Wishing you a speedy recovery and lots of gains when you return to your regularly scheduled workout program. Heal quick!

 

-Peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://theprehabguys.com/evidence-based-shoulder-exercises/

 

Swap out the barbell for some dumbbells - ring/suspended pushups are also a great push movement that allows free shoulder movement. Take a look at your thoracic and lat flexibility too, they could be pulling your joint into a less-than-ideal alignment. Even landmine presses can be a 'safer' option than barbell presses; but that's just my opinion, and I'm neither a PT professional nor trainer, so take a grain of salt with it. ;) 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This sounds like something very similar to what happened when I messed up my left shoulder a few years ago. I was ignorant and stupid and pushed through the pain without giving it a chance to heal, and ended up having to entirely stop lifting for three months of physical therapy, before it went back to nearly normal.

 

In my case, the bicep tendons became severely inflamed, right where they met the rotator cuff at the shoulder joint. The muscles in the joint tried to pick up the slack when the tendons became incapable of doing their part, which resulted in massive overuse and inflammation in them as well. I was prescribed strong anti-inflammatories and treated with massage to soften the very stiff and tense tissues, as well as targeted isolation exercises to strengthen the muscles in and around the shoulder joint to build them back up.

 

Rotator cuffs are very fragile. Do not be stupid like I was.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, scalyfreak said:

This sounds like something very similar to what happened when I messed up my left shoulder a few years ago. I was ignorant and stupid and pushed through the pain without giving it a chance to heal, and ended up having to entirely stop lifting for three months of physical therapy, before it went back to nearly normal.

 

In my case, the bicep tendons became severely inflamed, right where they met the rotator cuff at the shoulder joint. The muscles in the joint tried to pick up the slack when the tendons became incapable of doing their part, which resulted in massive overuse and inflammation in them as well. I was prescribed strong anti-inflammatories and treated with massage to soften the very stiff and tense tissues, as well as targeted isolation exercises to strengthen the muscles in and around the shoulder joint to build them back up.

 

Rotator cuffs are very fragile. Do not be stupid like I was.

Thanks for chiming in! I've done a boatload of research recently and have since severely modified my workouts to avoid any known pain causing exercises. For example, I'm doing floor presses as opposed to bench presses - and only once a week or so. The difference between the two is night and day for me. I have no pain whatsoever with the floor presses and I can actually feel my chest and triceps activating as opposed to my shoulders. I think my form is infinitely better with the floor presses, too.

 

I'm also working with specific lightweight resistance band exercises to correct my posture and gain better shoulder joint centration. All these measures are supposed to address the specific issues I'm having and will help me avoid placing any unnecessary stress on my rotator cuffs. So far, the warm "burning" has subsided in my right shoulder and all I feel now is a bit of front impingement discomfort in certain movement patterns. But again, if something hurts or is uncomfortable, I'm searching for alternate exercises that work the same muscle I'm trying to target but don't hurt my shoulder. I'll see how I feel in a month or so after following this course of action to the letter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, TakingTheWheel said:

 I've done a boatload of research recently and have since severely modified my workouts to avoid any known pain causing exercises.

 

That puts you miles ahead of where I was several years ago in the Don't Be Stupid department... you're realizing the consequences of not taking care of the joint and acting on it.

 

Floor presses are one of my favorite exercises.Overhead press, when done with correct form, also seems to help my shoulder. Just don't become overly ambitious about the weight on those. :)

 

Good luck with the shoulder!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, scalyfreak said:

 

That puts you miles ahead of where I was several years ago in the Don't Be Stupid department... you're realizing the consequences of not taking care of the joint and acting on it.

 

Floor presses are one of my favorite exercises.Overhead press, when done with correct form, also seems to help my shoulder. Just don't become overly ambitious about the weight on those. :)

 

Good luck with the shoulder!

For sure! I think part of my problem, too, was attempting to lift too heavy too soon. Adding more weight before you're ready for it doesn't necessarily equal more muscle. It just increases the odds for poor form and injury. Being relatively new to the gym, I'm learning when I can push myself a little harder and by how much to increase the weight. It's always better to add pounds in smaller increments, I've found. I guess what I'm trying to say is: know your limits. And then err on the side of caution. This fitness game is a marathon not a sprint. Gains will come by working out consistently over a period of time. Trust the process and stay the course.

 

I know self-diagnosis isn't always a good thing to do, but I'm at least trying to train smarter and really listen to my body. We only get one in this life. Why not make it the best it can be? :smile-new:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A while back when I was having shoulder issues

 

I picked a product called the shoulder horn

 

It worked good for me, and I still use it to this day

 

Here is a link to it--Here

 

Two other things that you can do are, one to start over head pressing as the over head press works the rotator cuff and will help to strengthen it.

 

A lot of people do not realize that back in the 50's and 60;s and even into the 70's the over head presses was the exercise of choice for those looking to get a strong upper body.

 

And back in the day, rotator cuff injuries were rare--I believe because of all of the presses that they did.

 

Also, supported one are rows and great for hitting the rear delt/rotator cuff area as well.

 

Hope this Helps.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now