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How many hours can I wait after fasted training to start eating?


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Hello!

 

I'm looking for some advice please! :)

 

I do intermittent fasting on 16:8 with my feasting window being 12pm to 8pm. I love to work out early in the mornings usually around 7/8 - I don't always work out this early but this is my favourite time to do so - I do purely weight training no cardio. I can't say after fasted training that early that I get particularly hungry waiting until 12pm to eat and I drink plenty of water (at least a litre just in the hour training session) so i'm all good on that front.

 

However I don't know if say my training finishes at 8am if its detrimental to then wait 4 hours to till 12pm to then break my fast? There's unfortunately no wiggle room with my feasting window as I still live in the family house and dinner/tea is set at 8pm.

 

Whenever I train within my feasting window I will have 2 tablespoons of Greek yoghurt before and after training to get my protein/BCAA's - just personal preference that i prefer to 'do it' through Greek yoghurt than protein shakes or BCAA powders.

 

So finally if it isn't great to be waiting 4 hours after my fasted training to break the fast should I either just break my fast earlier that day and have a longer feasting period or should i just have the 2 tablespoons of greek yoghurt ONLY AFTER my training and then wait as normal till 12pm to begin my actual feasting period?

 

Thankyou so much for any answers! 

 

Emmie

 

 

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On ‎7‎/‎26‎/‎2018 at 6:37 AM, emmieettrenne said:

However I don't know if say my training finishes at 8am if its detrimental to then wait 4 hours to till 12pm to then break my fast? There's unfortunately no wiggle room with my feasting window as I still live in the family house and dinner/tea is set at 8pm.

 

Whenever I train within my feasting window I will have 2 tablespoons of Greek yoghurt before and after training to get my protein/BCAA's - just personal preference that i prefer to 'do it' through Greek yoghurt than protein shakes or BCAA powders.

 

So finally if it isn't great to be waiting 4 hours after my fasted training to break the fast should I either just break my fast earlier that day and have a longer feasting period or should i just have the 2 tablespoons of greek yoghurt ONLY AFTER my training and then wait as normal till 12pm to begin my actual feasting period?

Don't overthink it. If you're not taking in any other periworkout nutrition, eat whatever your thing is before training to try to spare as much muscle as possible. Just make sure you're eating enough protein in your 8hr window (minimum 1g/lb of bodyweight) and the timing shouldn't matter much until you're more into intermediate/advanced years of lifting.

 

But if all you're taking in is greek yogurt for your workout, you may as well just train fasted, unless you feel like you have more energy with than without. Yogurt digests too slowly to offer any benefits to your workout, and 1/4c (ie. 4tbsp) of greek yogurt will be less than 8g of protein, and less than half a gram of that is likely to be BCAAs.

 

As an aside, some women find that daily IF really mucks with hormones long term -  if you start noticing symptoms like changes in your menstruation patterns, hair loss, fatigue, feeling cold all the time, etc. you may decide you'd like to experiment with a different fasting protocol. Maybe something like 5:2?

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Hi Defining, 

 

Thankyou so much for you answer, plenty of information for me to mull over and debate about! 

 

Can I just ask, In saying perhaps try the 5:2 method, does that mean you have come across other women that switched from daily to 5:2 and that it seems to be the fasting mode that works better for women than daily fasting? 

 

Thanks!

 

Emmie  

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It's a totally individual response, I personally think 5:2 is just less likely to create the negative hormonal responses that women can have from IF. I know plenty of women who do better on 5:2 or similar types of carb cycling (ie. two very low carb days a week, on rest days), and a handful that still prefer daily 16:8 - like I said, it depends. There is VERY little data on time restricted feeding (ie. 16:8) in humans, and less still on women specifically. 

 

Some reading: 

https://www.strongerbyscience.com/intermittent-fasting-study/  (bear in mind, this study was only on men)

https://darouwellness.com/intermittent-fasting-time-restricted-feeding-and-womens-hormones/

https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1155&context=wurjhns (women specific study, but it's small & preliminary data)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23591120 (also specific to overweight women, RE: carb cycling)

http://paleoforwomen.com/shattering-the-myth-of-fasting-for-women-a-review-of-female-specific-responses-to-fasting-in-the-literature/

https://content.iospress.com/articles/nutrition-and-healthy-aging/nha170036 (suggests that the biggest advantage of TRF is inadvertent caloric restriction, doesn't show advantages in insulin responses

...but I'm adorable! Ask anyone who doesn't know me...

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Ah nutrition, the great, it depends!

 

My $0.02 - as long as you are getting adequate protein throughout the day and are continuing to see results through your lifting (i.e. either more reps or more weight), then there shouldn't be an issue with fasting. Here's a link to a meta-analysis that pretty much says eating before or after might be helpful, but nothing conclusive. Note: it does say the advice on eating after working out is due to the assumption that people are training fasted, but the studies sited don't necessarily show a huge impact in untrained males (as the studies only use males). 

 

On 7/28/2018 at 11:20 AM, Defining said:

But if all you're taking in is greek yogurt for your workout, you may as well just train fasted, unless you feel like you have more energy with than without. Yogurt digests too slowly to offer any benefits to your workout, and 1/4c (ie. 4tbsp) of greek yogurt will be less than 8g of protein, and less than half a gram of that is likely to be BCAAs.

 

Agreed with this. If you start seeing a slow down on lifting progress, but don't want to change your eating patterns, I'd probably suggest switching over to BCAAs first and see if that is helpful. Generally, I'm not a huge proponent of supplements for "everyday" athletes, but in your case, it might be a helpful boost.

 

Side note: If IF is working well for you, don't get caught up in how it might not work for everyone. The thing about ALL nutrition advice is that it is so dependent on personal factors that it's really hard to get definitive answers. From my own personal experience, I initially tried IF on a standard macro ratio diet and it failed miserably. I've since had to switch my eating to low carb due to some health issues that are exacerbated by most high carb foods and have naturally switched over to a 16:8 schedule. Be aware of the potential issues that might arise so you can address them, but don't feel the need to change unless it makes sense to YOU. 

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