• Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

TakingTheWheel

Does anyone else's "pump" prevent them from completing a set?

Recommended Posts

I've been doing much better with my workouts as of late. Still going strong, still having fun, but I'm also still very much a beginner. However, one "issue" I've encountered has me a little puzzled.

 

Particularly when training arms (biceps, to be exact), I frequently find that the "pump" feeling towards the middle of an exercise totally overtakes my muscles and I have trouble completing a set (while maintaining proper form) because I simply can't bend contract/flex my bicep anymore. It feels too "full" and like there's nowhere for it to physically move. It's such an odd sensation and, while I've read that this feeling means the exercise is working, it's frustrating because I often have to increase my rest periods between sets or stagger my exercises to give the blood in my biceps time to move out of the way so I can keep working out. That approach doesn't always work though and sometimes I have to decrease the weight I'm using which I'm not thrilled about.

 

Any thoughts, comments, or advice about what I've described?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In general, when we can’t contract a muscle anymore during an exercise set it’s because we’ve depleted the ATP (adenosine triphosphate) in the cells.  The time we spend resting between sets allows our ATP to resupply.  

 

You can learn more on the topic by researching and studying the Krebs Cycle.

 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/31/2018 at 7:08 AM, Hazard said:

In general, when we can’t contract a muscle anymore during an exercise set it’s because we’ve depleted the ATP (adenosine triphosphate) in the cells.  The time we spend resting between sets allows our ATP to resupply.  

 

You can learn more on the topic by researching and studying the Krebs Cycle.

 

 

LOL.

 

Hey there TakingTheWheel! I'm glad you are enjoying training with weights! It is my favorite. 

 

"The pump" is a great thing if your goal is muscular hypertrophy (growth). If you would like an in detail explanation of the various factors that cause it this is a great article: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Brad_Schoenfeld/publication/285754036_The_Muscle_Pump_Potential_Mechanisms_and_Applications_for_Enhancing_Hypertrophic_Adaptations/links/56b33b4308ae795dd5c95fec/The-Muscle-Pump-Potential-Mechanisms-and-Applications-for-Enhancing-Hypertrophic-Adaptations.pdf.

 

What kind of weight are you using for bicep curls? What is your setxrep scheme look like? If you give a little more detail I might be able to help you think of some strategies to minimize pump and keep more of a full ROM (range of motion). But honestly the best way to reduce pump would be what you already mentioned - increase time between sets. However, if your main goal is "suns out guns out" the pump is something to be EXCITED about, IMO.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The pump is a thing I've only encountered in rock climbing, not lifting but yes, pay attention to it! It is a sign you are pushing yourself - your body is literally trying to cram all the oxygen-rich blood it can into your arms. Resting between sets is exactly what you should do about this. It's not an injury, but there is also no such thing as pushing through it. What is your rest time now? Try letting your hands hang at your sides and shake out for 2 minutes between sets.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now