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Lusse

Learn Martial Arts at home

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Hi,

I live on an island in the south Pacific, Rangiroa.

The island is only 3.000 people and so there are only basic shops and no really any gym or collective classes.

 

Is it possible to learn a martial art at home? I am thinking maybe if there are some good online lesson, kind of the Nerd Fitness Yoga, or other possibilities

Should I start by cleaning the car and painting the wall? :)

Thanks

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I don't really know...I like the idea of using the opponent strenght , like in Taijutsu, but I guess I won't complicate the task by choosing a specific discipline. 

Whatever it would be easiest to learn outside a dojo. 

I think I could train together with my wife.

 

 

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11 hours ago, Lusse said:

I don't really know...I like the idea of using the opponent strenght , like in Taijutsu, but I guess I won't complicate the task by choosing a specific discipline. 

Whatever it would be easiest to learn outside a dojo. 

I think I could train together with my wife.

 

Ah. You could check out the Gracie Combatives Beginner Program. You can drill and nail down the 36 fundamental techniques with your wife for a while (and even have yourselves evaluated). Think of it as cleaning cars, painting fences, and sanding floors for a year or so.

 

Eventually though a martial art will have to be pressure-tested for its effectiveness, but that's for another time. (You could even start out your own Gracie Garage over there.) :) Good luck!

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1 hour ago, Machete said:

 

Ah. You could check out the Gracie Combatives Beginner Program. You can drill and nail down the 36 fundamental techniques with your wife for a while (and even have yourselves evaluated). Think of it as cleaning cars, painting fences, and sanding floors for a year or so.

Great Thanks! I'll have a look at it

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Order of self training

 

1 breakfalls

Falling is dangerous if your not a kid anymore. Do this every time you train. It is a big deal. As or more important than stretching. Practice both rolling (like being shoved or tripped with momentum) and the breakfall (like being thrown or dropped strait down). And technical stand  up.

 

2. Technical standup, or stand in base. Train this every time you stand up.

 

3. S.P.E.A.R. system basics

 

Watch 1 through 8. This will help an untrained person turn existing startle flinch into self defense. This is like CPR. SPEAR will not turn you into a great fighter any more than CPR will turn you into a heart surgeon.

 

 

4. Then start the Gracie beginners program. Honestly even if your training at a bjj studio, the program is fantastic. I wish I had this when I first started BJJ.

 

5. Gracies womens empowered. I got this for my niece, but what I found is that it provides jujitsu for getting out of a ground fight, which almost no BJJ place trains for. This is actually really good for multiple opponent scenarios. Not saying you should try for your pink belt , but you can add some off those techniques to your training.

 

6. Wrestling, takedowns, and clinch fighting. It's very hard to train safely. I'm not sure how you would do that at home.

 

7.

Lastly return to standup.  here are some basics on MMA standup striking I found very helpful and they are more or less consistant with my striking coaches instruction. With some notes:

Defending round kicks by moving your leg laterally will get you kicked in the nuts in the real world. You have to evaluate the Chance of a getting attacked by a trained muy thai fighter kicking you hard enough to knock you down vs chances of getting in attacked by anyone else that is going for your nuts. Also, striking to the head with knuckles is dangerous to your hands. mma fighters have their hands taped and pass to protect their knuckles, consider that when training.

 

 

 

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One of the most difficult things to learn at home are the intangible things that you pick up from other people modeling them around you, like how you balance strength/speed and training safety. Don't just watch experts on YouTube, try to find video of people teaching beginners. Experts have a narrower safety margin due to years of practice, beginners need a wider one.

 

Put safety first. If you can't control a strike at the speed it's demonstrated, slow it down. Do it in slow motion the first few times if you have to. Also, echoing Panda's point about falling safely. It's a big deal, and a thing people drill a lot.

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