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KB Girl

KB Girl and all the curls

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Thursday was alright, long work day. Managed to get in my own training. Started with a swing-snatch set, 6 minutes with 10kg. Practicing my bracing through the up-swing part of it.. which is kinda tough because I feel like I don't get enough breath. So I focussed on relaxing the brace in the OH position to fix that, and it worked, but now I'm not sure if it's because of the relaxed brace or simply because it reduced my pace. Will have to practice that aspect more and see if I can relax it quicker up top. 

Then I planned to do 5 sets of 2:00 jerks with 2x16kg, but after the second set I decided to stop.. it was just not feeling very great, I wasn't feeling in control.. which is a bad thing with the 16's, they are still heavy for me. Days like these I don't know how I ever manage to lift these things for 10:00. 

Then I joined the body control class, lots of ring work... had to do pullups/dips etc assisted, worked on German hang which was enjoyable. 

 

Today/Friday I normally work in the mornings but I had no appointments and Jaap let me sleep in. I woke up at 11:45. it was the best. Also didn't do much the rest of the day. Most productive was spending an hour with Emma in the bathroom- her in the mini bathtub and me cleaning :D

So it has been fun, but getting a little anxious about my pile of work now.. so tomorrow I vow to get some of that done. 

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Woaaaa puzzle!! :D

 

7 hours ago, KB Girl said:

let me sleep in. I woke up at 11:45. it was the best.

 

haaa that lovely feeling!

 

7 hours ago, KB Girl said:

the first phase of the p1 program is actually kinda boring x) but we'll get to the fun stuff!  

 

It is, a little bit, although they made quite an effort on plank/push-up variety if I recall correctly :P Swings were fun though.

 

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17 hours ago, @mu said:

It is, a little bit, although they made quite an effort on plank/push-up variety if I recall correctly :P Swings were fun though.

Yea there are some fun elements :)

 

Today (Saturday) was good. Joined the body control class, which was mostly floor work and some mobility work. Feel like I've made some progress on the lizard (Ido portal move) and simple GMB monkeys felt very floaty. Legs were absolutely dying during the class! Which was good, because Thursday class was just rings so upper body. 

After that I did my own kettlebell work, some technique work and then went for a 10:00 set with the 10kg. Only did that once before at a 20 pace, managed to do it again so now it's official (we always say that once isn't a trick). I had thought it would take me some time to get the bracing/breathing thing under control but it actually went automatically straight away. Funny what a nights sleep can do for learning movement. 

 

 

After work we did a magic the gathering draft, which was great. I went 3-0, so I feel pretty awesome right now ;) Only ran out of time to play the other 3-0 to finish the tournament, but since that was Jaap we can do that tomorrow at home.

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On 1/12/2019 at 5:11 PM, KB Girl said:

After that I did my own kettlebell work, some technique work and then went for a 10:00 set with the 10kg. Only did that once before at a 20 pace, managed to do it again so now it's official (we always say that once isn't a trick). I had thought it would take me some time to get the bracing/breathing thing under control but it actually went automatically straight away. Funny what a nights sleep can do for learning movement. 

Awesomeee. :D 

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Sunday was teaching some classes + family time.. and losing miserably to Jaap in our final MTG match. He always wins, bastard. 

Monday I had a lot of mess to clean up from doing absolutely nothing friday-sunday.. I think cleaning the kitchen took me almost 2 hours x) 

Also did P1 with Emma. I can't do pushups and it annoys me greatly. 

 

Today (Tuesday) during lunch break I tried to buy the small elastic bands for smaller braids.. I visited 4 shops but couldn't find any :(

Got a bit of work done, some paperwork but mostly for the promotion of our kettlebell competition + training camp. https://kettlebell-open.nl/en/home/ 

Was pretty tired but still wanted to get my training in before evening classes started, so I tried some caffeine chewing gum (we got some free samples). It was interesting. I suppose this is why other people drink coffee / take pre workout. 

 

Had static jerks with 2x18kg on the program today. Really getting back into jerks properly after the short break to focus on snatch. Also did 2:30 jerks at high speed with 2x16kg and finished with 3:00 snatch with 16kg. That last set really killed me. Video behind the spoiler if anyone is interested. 

 

 

 

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I think the baby clothes all folded up Marie Kondo style are so adorable, it just makes them even littler.

 

Why can't you do pushups? I was trying to remember was your shoulder bothering you?

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8 hours ago, KB Girl said:

Also did P1 with Emma. I can't do pushups and it annoys me greatly. 

 

I'm willing to bet that by the end of P1 you WILL :D

 

8 hours ago, KB Girl said:

Was pretty tired but still wanted to get my training in before evening classes started, so I tried some caffeine chewing gum (we got some free samples). It was interesting. I suppose this is why other people drink coffee / take pre workout. 

 

That works for me usually except for handstands :P although I suspect it is not the one coffee before hand that gives me the shakes, but a little built-up of coffee + fatigue.

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Oh, do you not normally have caffeine at all? I don't take pre-workout and only really have coffee in the morning, but I really notice it on Saturday morning practices. :)

 

Nice Tuesday!

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True that it could help with promoting the sport if you could choreograph some sort of performance out of it, but except for a quick competition it seems difficult to highlight the endurance aspect.

 

Have you ever looked into the Wim Hof breathing btw? One of the benefits is improved endurance for the "several minutes" range, which is basically what you're working on in KB sport. Essentially it is like high-altitude training, without being at a high altitude.

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1 hour ago, SymphonicDan said:

Have you ever looked into the Wim Hof breathing btw? One of the benefits is improved endurance for the "several minutes" range, which is basically what you're working on in KB sport. Essentially it is like high-altitude training, without being at a high altitude.

Do you have any idea of how much of a difference it actually makes though? Like how much would you benefit from a breathing practice compared to just doing the thing, which will also include the skill/strength/mental component? I'm sure that if you compare doing the breathing vs not doing the breathing for untrained people you'll notice a difference, but I wonder how much of an effect it has on already highly trained endurance athletes?

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26 minutes ago, Mad Hatter said:

Do you have any idea of how much of a difference it actually makes though? Like how much would you benefit from a breathing practice compared to just doing the thing, which will also include the skill/strength/mental component? I'm sure that if you compare doing the breathing vs not doing the breathing for untrained people you'll notice a difference, but I wonder how much of an effect it has on already highly trained endurance athletes?

 

I wonder the same - I asked KB Girl partly as a suggestion and partly to see the perspective on this as an elite athlete. Some elite athletes do WHM - clearly they see some benefit, but why don't they all do it? Because the effect is small? Because it's not well-known yet? Because they have other parts of their training that cover everything the breathing would cover?

 

Just doing KB training itself (or football training, or daily HIIT or whatever) won't cover one relevant aspect, which is getting your body to produce HIF-alpha1 and EPO, which produce more red blood cells, and therefore improving endurance. It's possible that normal training would do this to a degree anyway, but I''m skeptical because very fit people get altitude sickness as readily as quite unfit people, and the way to prevent altitude sickness is to boost red blood cells. Normally this boost of red blood cells happens from staying a few days in a mildly hypoxic environment (high altitude) but it can also be achieved with more acute hypoxic stress, the easiest method being WHM. Free-diving O2 tables, hypobaric chambers and other artificial environments are also possible.

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Another question would be if aerobic endurance is more of a limiting factor than local strength endurance, I wonder what the relative benefit is for KB sports vs running or cycling?

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On 1/15/2019 at 11:47 PM, Elastigirl said:

I think the baby clothes all folded up Marie Kondo style are so adorable, it just makes them even littler.

 

Why can't you do pushups? I was trying to remember was your shoulder bothering you?

Yea these little packets :) She's getting big already, but my sister just had a baby and she did the same after I send her the picture and it was even more adorable <3

My shoulder was bothering me! Good memory! But it's mostly okay now. I can't do the pushups because I'm honestly too weak right now x) 

 

On 1/16/2019 at 5:43 AM, @mu said:

I'm willing to bet that by the end of P1 you WILL :D

 

That works for me usually except for handstands :P although I suspect it is not the one coffee before hand that gives me the shakes, but a little built-up of coffee + fatigue.

I'm optimistic yea :)

I can imagine caffeine jitters + fatigue is not inductive to good handstand sessions.. but imagining is all it is, the only caffeine I get is from tea normally. 

 

On 1/16/2019 at 5:06 PM, raptron said:

Oh, do you not normally have caffeine at all? I don't take pre-workout and only really have coffee in the morning, but I really notice it on Saturday morning practices. :)

Nope- just some in tea. I wasn't a big coffee drinker anyway and completely quiet all caffeine when I was pregnant and while breastfeeding. 

Aren't you ever tempted to have some caffeine before other training times then? 

 

22 hours ago, Suzaqu said:

That KB competition looks so cool, but like a ton of work to plan! 

Yea, it is and it really is :) I do enjoy it, the whole community gets together. So many people help out with running things, it's amazing- and then getting to meet new people and see everyone again, it's great!

 

19 hours ago, SymphonicDan said:

 

I wonder the same - I asked KB Girl partly as a suggestion and partly to see the perspective on this as an elite athlete. Some elite athletes do WHM - clearly they see some benefit, but why don't they all do it? Because the effect is small? Because it's not well-known yet? Because they have other parts of their training that cover everything the breathing would cover?

 

Just doing KB training itself (or football training, or daily HIIT or whatever) won't cover one relevant aspect, which is getting your body to produce HIF-alpha1 and EPO, which produce more red blood cells, and therefore improving endurance. It's possible that normal training would do this to a degree anyway, but I''m skeptical because very fit people get altitude sickness as readily as quite unfit people, and the way to prevent altitude sickness is to boost red blood cells. Normally this boost of red blood cells happens from staying a few days in a mildly hypoxic environment (high altitude) but it can also be achieved with more acute hypoxic stress, the easiest method being WHM. Free-diving O2 tables, hypobaric chambers and other artificial environments are also possible.

It's a interesting suggestion/question.. I'm assuming the biggest part of why not everyone does it, is that it hasn't been researched very well yet. Elite athletes tend not to experiment on themselves. (btw it's really nice of you to put me in that category but I'm so so so far away from that!) 

 

That very fit people get altitude sickness doesn't really tell you that they don't have an increased amount of red blood cells. Endurance training at normal altitudes does in fact increase the production of EPO and red blood cells. But that alone does not protect from altitude sickness, meaning if you wanted to climb a mountain you couldn't prevent altitude sickness just by injecting EPO during the weeks before. Ofcourse that doesn't mean that mild hypoxia might not still be useful for endurance athletes, many of them do altitude training after all.. but it's hard to say wether the Wim Hof breathing will have the same effect. 

 

Another factor to consider is that training time is limited and time not spend training should ideally be spend with the parasympathetic nervous system more active. Practicing WH breathing during down time would mess with that. 

 

19 hours ago, Mad Hatter said:

Another question would be if aerobic endurance is more of a limiting factor than local strength endurance, I wonder what the relative benefit is for KB sports vs running or cycling?

There is definitely a difference between running/cycling and KB sport... there is a limited amount of research done on KB sport, so we mostly go by the research done on rowers. Rowing time is about 6-7 minutes at the elite level, which is comparable to our 10 minutes. Some research done on elite KB athletes also shows that it's around 7-8 minutes that the anearobic system starts to take over more and more. 

For rowers altitude training is not beneficial because it does not increase their VO2 max, which is the most important factor in sprint sports. So you might have more oxygen available, but if you can't use it then it's.. well.. useless. Having said that, they all do secretly take EPO... so I think it's not that the altitude isn't beneficial at all, but that actually spending the time training (as you suggested) is more beneficial. So that might go for breathing techniques too? I don't know. I wouldn't personally want to mess with it because of the recovery aspect from the parasympathetic nervous system I mentioned above. In fact, they teach a different breathing technique to a lot of elite athletes now, which basically puts your body into the parasympathetic nervous system, as a lot of athletes are a bit high strung and have trouble with the relaxing part. And yes, that breathing is basically opposite of the WH method, you breath out, "hold" that for a bit before you breath back in.

 

Also fun fact, Wim Hof is dutch, just like me :P

 

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2 hours ago, KB Girl said:

I can't do the pushups because I'm honestly too weak right now x) 

Our bodies and muscles are so interesting. You can crank out so many jerks with those big badass kettlebells, and are struggling to do pushups. I still struggle doing a jerk with a 25lb bell, but can do pushups. I guess you just adapt to what you are focusing on

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1 hour ago, Elastigirl said:

Our bodies and muscles are so interesting. You can crank out so many jerks with those big badass kettlebells, and are struggling to do pushups. I still struggle doing a jerk with a 25lb bell, but can do pushups. I guess you just adapt to what you are focusing on

Adaptation is definitely a very real thing! But this is mostly just because jerks is 95% legs and pushups requires quite a bit of arm/shoulder strength, which you have and I apparently don't xD Oh and let's not forget our weight difference, bodyweight definitely helps with doing those jerks. 

 

 

Ok last update was Tuesday and it's already Monday.. time flies. 

 

Highlights; 

- Did my P1 work on Wednesday and Friday. Had a good kettlebell training on Thursday and a real proper rest on Saturday because.. I had a small local competition on Sunday. 

- I competed in biathlon (10:00 jerk + 10:00 snatch). I did 135 jerks with 2x12kg in 9:00 minutes, because I was on the platform with someone I coach and I wanted to watch her last minute.. and then I did 158 snatches also with a 12kg bell. Both are huge PRs because it's been almost 6 months since I competed with 12's :) Definitely happy I finally seem to be making progress in snatch. 

- A friend from Germany stayed over for 2 days and went to the competition with me. It was nice to have her around, she's really nice and we have a lot to chat about. She also doesn't mind my crazy family so we had dinner at my moms on Saturday. It did mean not so much down time for me (which is tiring for an introvert) and throwing me off my routine. And it meant an epic cleaning session of the spare bedroom/clothes closet room the day before she came. And by epic I mean HOURS spend cleaning. 

 

 

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You're an elite athlete because you have spent a lot of time taking it seriously, studying it, teaching, preparing for competitions. In my opinion the medals and world rankings etc. are of secondary importance, but you've had success here too, so yes as far as I'm concerned you should think of yourself as an elite athlete :)

 

Interesting what you say about hypoxia training in general, thanks. A couple of things I'm not sure about though:

 

3 hours ago, KB Girl said:

That very fit people get altitude sickness doesn't really tell you that they don't have an increased amount of red blood cells. Endurance training at normal altitudes does in fact increase the production of EPO and red blood cells. But that alone does not protect from altitude sickness, meaning if you wanted to climb a mountain you couldn't prevent altitude sickness just by injecting EPO during the weeks before.

 

Do you know what else changes in the body (aside from extra red blood cells) as the body acclimatizes to higher altitudes? I ask partly because I'm surprised, and partly because I'm going to Ecuador in a week's time and want to climb a mountain to over 5000 metres, and extra understanding around this will help me survive this :)

 

 

3 hours ago, KB Girl said:

For rowers altitude training is not beneficial because it does not increase their VO2 max, which is the most important factor in sprint sports. So you might have more oxygen available, but if you can't use it then it's.. well.. useless. Having said that, they all do secretly take EPO... 

 

From my understanding (and I just checked Wikipedia for a second opinion) the most common limiting factor affecting VO2 max is the supply of Oxygen to the mitochondria, which is boosted by EPO, and the secondary possible factor is the performance of the mitochondria, which is also shown to be improved by hypoxic stress.

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15 hours ago, Elastigirl said:

Woot for the PRs!

Thank you! :)

 

16 hours ago, SymphonicDan said:

You're an elite athlete because you have spent a lot of time taking it seriously, studying it, teaching, preparing for competitions. In my opinion the medals and world rankings etc. are of secondary importance, but you've had success here too, so yes as far as I'm concerned you should think of yourself as an elite athlete :)

 

Interesting what you say about hypoxia training in general, thanks. A couple of things I'm not sure about though:

 

 

Do you know what else changes in the body (aside from extra red blood cells) as the body acclimatizes to higher altitudes? I ask partly because I'm surprised, and partly because I'm going to Ecuador in a week's time and want to climb a mountain to over 5000 metres, and extra understanding around this will help me survive this :)

 

 

 

From my understanding (and I just checked Wikipedia for a second opinion) the most common limiting factor affecting VO2 max is the supply of Oxygen to the mitochondria, which is boosted by EPO, and the secondary possible factor is the performance of the mitochondria, which is also shown to be improved by hypoxic stress.

Ah I might have an above average understanding, but I can't even lift the kettlebells that elite athletes would lift, so.. no :) and I don't train like an elite athlete either. I do make people train like elite athletes, so maybe I can be an elite athlete coach. That'd be nice. 

 

Ohhh I think the WH breathing you've been doing will definitely contribute to surviving your climb! The other adaptations are things like increased respiratory rate, increased blood pressure.. and I think even the permeability of the lung tissue increases. You'll basically be hyperventilating the entire time, so it's good you've sort of become used to that feeling. 

 

I'm not sure the performance of the mitochondria is improved by hypoxic stress.. just for example take a look at this publication; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24674976

Having said that, for performance, especially in KB sport, someone with a lower VO2 max can actually win the competition just by moving more efficiently. More efficiently down to a cellular level, relaxing more, and simply using less energy. That's why I perform reasonably well despite having a low training volume and terrible endurance. 

 

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20 hours ago, KB Girl said:

KB sport

This doesn't really roll off the tongue very well.  I think from now on I am going to call your sport K-ball, and I can call you a professional K-baller :) 

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Go, go, go biathlon PRs. :D And yay for your friend visiting, but ugh at the pre-visitor cleaning frenzy. It's so tiring! 

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5 hours ago, KB Girl said:

I'm not sure the performance of the mitochondria is improved by hypoxic stress.. just for example take a look at this publication; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24674976

 

Interesting - good to know that this half of the equation is still subject to debate. I read somewhere that looked reputable that hypoxia does improve mitochontrial function, but can't find that information now - maybe that was not so reliable...

 

Also note that they had only 17 subjects for their controlled trial, so it's harder for them to get statistical significance on that scale, and their protocol might be different to other methods for administering hypoxia (duration, intensity, frequency, number of treatments, normobaric / hypobaric / voluntary retention, etc.)

 

Biology is complicated :o

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