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Rusk

That Orc Skips the Pity Party

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1 hour ago, WhiteGhost said:

Huh, I always thought it would be hard so I have never tried learning.  Time to give it a try I guess :) 

I don't know how flour is marketed in China, but you need a high protein flour.  I've seen them labeled as Strong flour, Bread flour, Patent Flour and Clear flour.

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23 minutes ago, Rusk said:

I don't know how flour is marketed in China, but you need a high protein flour.  I've seen them labeled as Strong flour, Bread flour, Patent Flour and Clear flour.

Flour here is usually marketed by use, so we have dumpling flour, noodle four, breading flour (for frying meat, not making bread), regular flour, etc.  I will have to look around to see which kind of flour has more protein.

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1 minute ago, WhiteGhost said:

Flour here is usually marketed by use, so we have dumpling flour, noodle four, breading flour (for frying meat, not making bread), regular flour, etc.  I will have to look around to see which kind of flour has more protein.

If your local flour merchant knows his stuff, you're looking for flour that is 12-13% protein.  My money is on the noodle flour, but don't quote me on that.

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59 minutes ago, Rusk said:

 

 

My mother did that for as long as I can remember. Different equipment and ingredients,  but it always ended with tasty loaves of bread. :)

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Today got out of hand really fast.  Had the house to myself, had a bit more to drink than I planned, but I got some good studying done, so yay.  Also weighed in this morning at 294, so yay. 

Here's something new I learned reviewing the baking textbook.  Autolysation is a technique where, instead of mixing your flour, water, yeast and salt together for making bread like normal, you just mix the flour and water until barely combine, and let it sit for 30 minutes.  The gluten and starch will completely hydrate so it will be much easier to work after you add the salt & yeast and continue breadmaking normally.  I am going to try this tonight with some red fife bread dough and let it ferment in the fridge overnight to see what happens.

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5 hours ago, Rusk said:


Here's something new I learned reviewing the baking textbook.  Autolysation is a technique where, instead of mixing your flour, water, yeast and salt together for making bread like normal, you just mix the flour and water until barely combine, and let it sit for 30 minutes.  The gluten and starch will completely hydrate so it will be much easier to work after you add the salt & yeast and continue breadmaking normally.  I am going to try this tonight with some red fife bread dough and let it ferment in the fridge overnight to see what happens.

 

This is brilliant, I can't wait to hear how it turns out. I adore making bread and used to do it all the time, and then the hubs and I kinda stopped eating bread for a while so I haven't made any in years. I used to really geek out about my sourdough starters, in particular. I do love yeasted bread and find it easier, but different sourdoughs were such fun. 

 

Will it ferment in the fridge? I guess I've never tried any form of fermentation at anything other than room temperature. It's bedtime, and now my brain has something to wonder about ... great ... overthinking time! 

 

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1 hour ago, Gemma said:

Will it ferment in the fridge? I guess I've never tried any form of fermentation at anything other than room temperature.

 

The bread masterclass video channel had a sourdough video. :)

 

He said you can store your starter in the fridge and it slows down so you won't have to feed it as often.

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7 hours ago, Gemma said:

 

This is brilliant, I can't wait to hear how it turns out. I adore making bread and used to do it all the time, and then the hubs and I kinda stopped eating bread for a while so I haven't made any in years. I used to really geek out about my sourdough starters, in particular. I do love yeasted bread and find it easier, but different sourdoughs were such fun. 

 

Will it ferment in the fridge? I guess I've never tried any form of fermentation at anything other than room temperature. It's bedtime, and now my brain has something to wonder about ... great ... overthinking time! 

 

 

I don't bake bread often enough to bother keeping a sourdough starter.  And yes, regular old bread dough will ferment overnight in the fridge, it is how most smaller bakeshops are set up (make dough in evening, ferment overnight in a cooler, shape, proof and bake in the morning).

 

I mostly prefer the sponge method  of mixing a little flour, water and a decent amount of yeast, letting it ferment for 2 hours until it is VERY frothy, and using the entire thing to make my batch of bread.  Kind of a next best thing for me. 

The experiment is delayed until tonight/tomorrow morning.

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Food Summary (since I didn't unintentionally get drunk and ate the fridge today)

Meal 1- Proats with blueberries & seeds, tea (Pre-Workout)

P- 58.9
C- 80.5
F- 19.1

 

Post-Workout Snack- Shake & Banana

P- 22.5

C- 25.1

F- 1


Meal 2- Herbed tofu scramble with leeks & cabbage

P- 28.8

C- 17.2

F- 13

 

Meal 3- Fruit & Skyr

P- 41.8

C- 45

F- 1.2

 

Meal 4- Beet Dal

P- 23

C- 67.3

F- 15.8

 

Meal 5- Cherry Smoothie

P- 65.5
C- 19.1

F- 22.9

 

Total P- 240.6/240 (yay)

Total C- 254.2/245 (No Biggie)

Total F- 72.9/85 (Not complaining)

Total Fiber- 75 g (pretty good)

 

 

I might drop my fat to 75g and bump up the carbs a bit, seeing as the trend tends to lean that way.

I've been making good progress through my baking textbook.  The chapters are getting quicker, since the bulk of them are recipes that I don't need to memorize.  

 

 

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On 1/10/2019 at 2:12 PM, Rusk said:

Baking bread is one of the simplest things ever.  Only reason most people don't is because they have shitty time management skills. 

 

Or they don't have enough patience...

 

I got inspired by this thread and the video and decided to attempt homemade bread, for the first time in a couple of decades or so. I had forgotten that kneading it actually is fun!  I may or may not have pictured the dough was Big Stress Monster and pounded away at it. :D

 

The dough has been sitting for an hour and a half, and it is proving very slowly. I remember from my mother's bread making that this part is what takes the longest, and since the guy in the video seems to know what he is talking about, I'm just going to leave the dough alone until it's done. I've been going over there and peeked at it through the glass bowl, and I can tell the proving is happening, just slowly. 

 

But yes, this part really requires patience... don't lift the towel, don't poke the dough, don't add things or stir it or overthink, or anything. Basically, leave it alone and let it work until it's done.

 

Or, as Husband suggested, practice his favorite management style on the dough. <_<

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7 hours ago, scalyfreak said:

 

Or they don't have enough patience...

 

I got inspired by this thread and the video and decided to attempt homemade bread, for the first time in a couple of decades or so. I had forgotten that kneading it actually is fun!  I may or may not have pictured the dough was Big Stress Monster and pounded away at it. :D

 

The dough has been sitting for an hour and a half, and it is proving very slowly. I remember from my mother's bread making that this part is what takes the longest, and since the guy in the video seems to know what he is talking about, I'm just going to leave the dough alone until it's done. I've been going over there and peeked at it through the glass bowl, and I can tell the proving is happening, just slowly. 

 

But yes, this part really requires patience... don't lift the towel, don't poke the dough, don't add things or stir it or overthink, or anything. Basically, leave it alone and let it work until it's done.

 

Or, as Husband suggested, practice his favorite management style on the dough. <_<

Time management, patience, close enough.  I have mastered the art of setting a timer and doing something else in the meantime, essential kitchen skill.  
PRO TIP
Let your dough proof in the oven.  Do NOT turn your oven on, just leave the light on, and put a metal pan in the very bottom and add a cup of boiling water to it.  This will raise the internal temperature of the oven to a good proofing range (25-27 degrees C) and add some helpful humidity.  I only turn the oven on after I have portioned & shaped the dough and it's getting its final rise before baking.

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Sooo baking experiment....  Kinda underwhelmed at the moment.

 

I made my tried & true wholegrain bread (red fife flour, more on that later), and use the autolysing thing before the final mix and I really don't have much to report.  My recipe relies on a sponge (mixture of flour water and yeast left to ferment unstead of just adding yeast straight to the dough) so the autolysing didn't have much water to begin with.  Dough still looks fine and it coming back up to room temp as we speak.  Fermenting was a bit slower than I would have liked but it should bounce back soon.

I will likely retry this experiment with a straight dough white bread (so basically all ingredients are mixed together at once and go on from there) before I write it off completely.

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Alright, Orclings, gather around for a bit of Canadian history.

 

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Red Fife is a heritage variety of what that was first introduced to Canada in the mid 1840s.  It was one of the first widely successful wheats to be grown out west.  Oats, spelt, barley and rye always did well, but they're not the best for bread.  Since it is a wheat, it could be used for more than just bread (like cookies, quick breads, or some of the sturdier pastries) depending on how well it is milled.  The stuff I am able to get ahold of easily is 100% whole grain with a fine grind, so there are no bits of bran that need to be sifted out.  This limits it to savoury breads, but that doesn't bother me much.

 

Since red fife has a somewhat lower protein level than regular wheat, it benefits best from a sponge or sourdough method, long fermenting times and little kneading.  It will never rise as much as wheat bread does, so longer shaped loaves are usually preferred.  I think it's delicious, with a warm, yeasty and toasty flavour.  It practically begs for a bowl of stew and some fresh butter.  

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Finished product, fresh from the oven.  Still getting the hang of using proofing baskets, bit too much flour on them.  Overall, no real improvements in making them.  Loaves are about 1 pound each

I'll try white bread tonight/tomorrow morning, should be better.

20190113_081119.jpg

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7 hours ago, Rusk said:


Let your dough proof in the oven.  Do NOT turn your oven on, just leave the light on, and put a metal pan in the very bottom and add a cup of boiling water to it.  This will raise the internal temperature of the oven to a good proofing range (25-27 degrees C) and add some helpful humidity.  I only turn the oven on after I have portioned & shaped the dough and it's getting its final rise before baking.

 

Oooh, I like this idea. When the oven preheated in anticipation of baking the bread, I noticed that yeast likes being near the hot air that comes out of the oven exhaust. The oven method with boiling water seems more controlled and less of a contrast in going from cool to hot.

 

Also, checked the flour bag, and the one I happened to have at home has very low protein. I will see about obtaining flour with more protein, and try again. I told husband I intend to practice bread making until I get it right, so he will just have to live with eating the failed experiments for a while :)

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18 minutes ago, scalyfreak said:

 

Oooh, I like this idea. When the oven preheated in anticipation of baking the bread, I noticed that yeast likes being near the hot air that comes out of the oven exhaust. The oven method with boiling water seems more controlled and less of a contrast in going from cool to hot.

 

Also, checked the flour bag, and the one I happened to have at home has very low protein. I will see about obtaining flour with more protein, and try again. I told husband I intend to practice bread making until I get it right, so he will just have to live with eating the failed experiments for a while :)

12-13% protein is idea.  
I live in a very old house and the "kitchen" doubles as the main entrace, so lots of drafts.  Helps keep the dough at a constant temperature.  You just need a little water to create some humidity.

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8 minutes ago, Rusk said:

Helps keep the dough at a constant temperature. 

 

Honestly, that sounds like the biggest benefit from putting it in the oven. Putting it in a fridge over night would accomplish the same thing, but slow stuff way down.

 

Good bread flour sounds like something the local Co-op can help me with. :) 

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I have precious little time left before surgery.  A friend of mine and I went to Costco to stock up on supplies, and I spent 5 solid hours ripping apart and cleaning, condensing and organizing the kitchen.  I got maybe half done.  

Where before there was mess, now there is cleanliness.
Where there was clutter, there is order. 

Germ wives are crying over the corpses of their germ husbands.

 

Tomorrow, I tackle the pantry & dish area.  Total victory, or death!
waaagh-is-coming-21.jpg

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20190113_170033.jpg

20190113_170416.jpg

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Clocked in again at 294, haven't been the most consistent in eating the past few days.  On my way to the hospital soon, hope the Dok Boyz don't chop too much off.

 

Painboy3.jpg.fb4c5ac923e72c580ed3038dee772162.jpg

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Surgery went smoothly from the doctor's perspective.  nerve is no longer impinged and i should expect a full recovery.  

on the patient's end...

 

no amount of machismo, testosterone or tough guy attitude is going to keep you calm when in the surgeon's room.  2mg of atavan did absolutely nothing to help.  Getting frozen with the biggest goddamned needle ive ever seen was the worst part.  the actual surgery was only 3 minutes, surprisingly.  but hearing and feeling your bones and ligaments move and grind when there is hardly any pain, just pressure, is such an alien experience, so weird...  

 

Right now, the freezing is starting to wear off and I have to get a meatloaf in the oven.  Got a dinner date, made Italian meatloaf (blend of beef & sausage, spread flat, shingled with mozza cheese, genoa salami and sauteed mushrooms before being rolled into a log.  Served with herbed zucchini, and brown butter mash.  Dark chocolate truffles for dessert.

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1 hour ago, Rusk said:

Surgery went smoothly from the doctor's perspective.  nerve is no longer impinged and i should expect a full recovery.  

on the patient's end...


Excellent. 

 

1 hour ago, Rusk said:

no amount of machismo, testosterone or tough guy attitude is going to keep you calm when in the surgeon's room.  2mg of atavan did absolutely nothing to help.  Getting frozen with the biggest goddamned needle ive ever seen was the worst part.  the actual surgery was only 3 minutes, surprisingly.  but hearing and feeling your bones and ligaments move and grind when there is hardly any pain, just pressure, is such an alien experience, so weird...  

 


The things I fear most are needles and general anaesthetic. And giant leech whales. But yeah, being awake for a surgery also sounds... unpleasant. Enjoy your delicious feast and recover rapidly! So rapidly that doctors are suspicious and test you for special powers and/or drugs. 

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dinner was great, then my dog had a seizure, despite being on 2 meds for it.  they come un clusters, so i rushed him to the vet, smashed my operated hand in the process.  didnt break any stitches but i got blood all over myself, the car and my face.  been crying the whole time, vets did their best to clean/redress my hand and it is in agony why can i never catch a break this shits aqlways happening it never stops

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