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The IE Group - Intuitive Eating Support Group

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1 hour ago, Diadhuit said:

I found this interesting resource that is nearly a response to what we were saying about IE cons: http://claudiatfelty.com/blog/2018/3/27/balancing-nutrition-science-with-intuitive-eating
Thoughts?

I love this article! This is exactly what gentle nutrition is about. 

IE isn't just shoving everything into your mouth because you're scared of being deprived, it's about eating in a way that makes you feel good and keeps you healthy. 

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1 hour ago, Diadhuit said:

I am struggling at the moment... I am eating my stress from being undermined at work, from being sick for basically whole January, from trying to buy a house, from a fight with my boyfriend, from nostalgia of Italy, from grieving my grandad.

 

Wow! That's a lot to handle! No wonder you're struggling! Really sorry to hear about your granddad :( 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Diadhuit said:

I found this interesting resource that is nearly a response to what we were saying about IE cons: http://claudiatfelty.com/blog/2018/3/27/balancing-nutrition-science-with-intuitive-eating
Thoughts?

 

I'm sorry, but I don't think it answers pretty much any of the "lies" this article that we linked earlier about IE mentions https://rebootedbody.com/intuitive-eating-lie/

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2 hours ago, Tobbe said:

 

I'm sorry, but I don't think it answers pretty much any of the "lies" this article that we linked earlier about IE mentions https://rebootedbody.com/intuitive-eating-lie/

I disagree 

 

Rebooted body:

"Certain Foods Screw Up Your Body’s Hunger And Satiety Signaling." 

 

Claudia:

"We don’t just throw out nutrition science when we embrace intuitive eating." 

 

Rebooted body:

"Other Factors Can Screw Up Your Body’s Hunger And Satiety Signaling." (like sleep and stress) 

 

Claudia:

"You learn to become more in tune with your body signals." 

So not just hunger, you'll also become more aware of stress and sleep problems if you have those. 

 

Rebooted body 

"You Might Just Overrule Your Body’s Hunger And Satiety Signaling." 

 

Again:

Claudia:

"You learn to become more in tune with your body signals." 

So no, if you're truly earing intuitively this won't happen. 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Diadhuit said:

I am struggling at the moment... I am eating my stress from being undermined at work, from being sick for basically whole January, from trying to buy a house, from a fight with my boyfriend, from nostalgia of Italy, from grieving my grandad.

My bloods returned high colesterol (no wonder looking at how I'm eating...) and was looking at how to manage that with IE. I found this interesting resource that is nearly a response to what we were saying about IE cons: http://claudiatfelty.com/blog/2018/3/27/balancing-nutrition-science-with-intuitive-eating
Thoughts?

Sent from my FIG-LX1 using Tapatalk
 

 

Recognizing eating from stress shows some strength. So does posting when there’s struggle!

 

I am not sure how I feel about the article. My husband tried some nutrition fixes for his cholesterol, and they frustrated him pretty badly. He seems healthier in mind and body now that he is taking medicine. Of course everyone needs to make their own choices when they get blood work back. There’s no one right path. 

 

I feel like I’m struggling with IE right now, too. It’s the consistency that I’m lacking. Most days I’m in tune to eating well. Emotions still take over on other days. I have a tricky month ahead of me with 3 Birthdays to celebrate in my house. Food has always been a big part of those celebrations. Food with extended family, close family, friends, the whole class at school.  Just a lot of food to enjoy...without overdoing. 

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13 minutes ago, suzyQlou said:

Emotions still take over on other days.

There is this website lifeontellus.com that has helped me a lot with this (they have a free course). 

Basically you first work on seeing the urge to eat, notice the emotions that drive it. 

Secondly you sit with the urge/the emotions for a bit. Acknowledging that they are there, but not acting on them. 

The third step is "shift". Were you shift your attention back to what you were doing. Basically being mindful of the task at hand. 

 

It took me over a year to really get this, so don't be too hard on yourself. 

 

19 minutes ago, suzyQlou said:

Just a lot of food to enjoy...without overdoing. 

Nothing wrong with overdoing it on occasion. If you go in with the fear of overdoing you will either binge eat everything or feel deprived at the end. 

Focus on the people and really taste your food, find out what your favorite is. Maybe there are foods you thought you loved, but actually don't taste so good now you are eating them mindfully. 

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42 minutes ago, Terah said:

Maybe there are foods you thought you loved, but actually don't taste so good now you are eating them mindfully.

 

I kind of had this happen to me yesterday. We were at a friend's house, and they served apple pie with ice cream. And I was super excited, because I *love* apple pie. But when we sat down to eat it actually didn't taste all that good. And neither did the ice cream. I bet the ice cream had been in the freezer for too long. It had that "freezer taste" to it :( And the apple pie was kind of bland and lacked texture contrasts. I ate several servings, just to make sure :P, but no - it really wasn't all that good... Disappointing :(  I really did want to love it!

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34 minutes ago, Terah said:

There is this website lifeontellus.com that has helped me a lot with this (they have a free course). 

Thanks!  I will check this out. I am reading the EatQ book you recommended a while back. It has similar strategies. I find myself  pausing, thinking about emotions more. But I still haven’t stopped acting on them. It’s a little progress, I guess. 

 

34 minutes ago, Terah said:

Nothing wrong with overdoing it on occasion. If you go in with the fear of overdoing you will either binge eat everything or feel deprived at the end. 

Focus on the people and really taste your food, find out what your favorite is. Maybe there are foods you thought you loved, but actually don't taste so good now you are eating them mindfully. 

Yeah. Single occasions don’t bother me. I am happy to have Birthday cake at a Birthday party. I dread the number of special occasions stacked one after the other.  I stop enjoying them, and just feel obligated to continue attending them. 

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1 hour ago, suzyQlou said:

Yeah. Single occasions don’t bother me. I am happy to have Birthday cake at a Birthday party. I dread the number of special occasions stacked one after the other.

 

I can totally relate to this. I've come to a point where I no longer fear a single happening much anymore. But when I feel that there are too many in a row. When I feel that my body won't have time to properly deal with the first one before it's time for the next one. That's when I get anxious/stressed out.

 

But trusting IE we're supposed to reach for the salad bowl instead of the candy bowl when the body doesn't need any more fast energy. And we're not even supposed to think about it, because it's supposed to be a totally natural act.  Needless to say, I'm not there yet.

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5 hours ago, Terah said:

"You learn to become more in tune with your body signals." 

So not just hunger, you'll also become more aware of stress and sleep problems if you have those. 

 

That's definitely been true for me. I thought I was fairly in tune with my body until I started trying to listen to my hunger signals. Then I started noticing a bunch of other signals that I'd been ignoring, like chronic sleep deprivation and dehydration.

 

2 hours ago, Tobbe said:

But trusting IE we're supposed to reach for the salad bowl instead of the candy bowl when the body doesn't need any more fast energy. And we're not even supposed to think about it, because it's supposed to be a totally natural act.  Needless to say, I'm not there yet.

 

I'm not so sure it can or should be a "totally natural" act. Maybe some day in the distant future, when we all become zen masters who are 100% integrated with our bodies. For now, I think it's okay to have to think about it a little bit. You notice that you need to eat something, and you think about it. Feel it out. What do I need to eat right now? What sounds good? It might be the candy, it might be the salad. It might be something you don't have on hand, and then you have to make do. This process is probably not going to be something that happens automatically.

 

At least, that's how I'm defining "intuitive" eating for myself. The intuition is in listening to my body, feeling out what it actually wants. It's not instinctual eating, it's intuitive. And since my brain is part of my body, eating for emotional reasons can be valid, too. If I intuit that eating a favorite food is the easiest way to sooth myself after a stressful situation, that might be well worth it! But at the same time, if I realize that the stress-relief food is going to make me feel a bit sick and bloated, then I need to find an alternative.

 

So that's what I'm trying to do... as far as how well I'm doing it, well... I'm trying. A lot of the time, I get to the "I'm hungry" part and look around for the nearest snack, rather than really asking myself what my body is telling me it needs. And sometimes, I know what I need (fresh fruit and veg) but I have none on hand, so I just go with sugary dried fruit or something similar. So I can improve my nutrition by making better snack options available to myself, but I have to put in the effort to actually do that.

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10 minutes ago, Jett said:

At least, that's how I'm defining "intuitive" eating for myself. The intuition is in listening to my body, feeling out what it actually wants. It's not instinctual eating, it's intuitive. And since my brain is part of my body, eating for emotional reasons can be valid, too. If I intuit that eating a favorite food is the easiest way to sooth myself after a stressful situation, that might be well worth it! But at the same time, if I realize that the stress-relief food is going to make me feel a bit sick and bloated, then I need to find an alternative.

WORD. :P

 

I also don't really follow the 'official' IE party lines - my interpretation often includes a weekly meal plan, and the intuitive part is in deciding which food/how much/when to eat. 'We're supposed to reach to the salad instead of the candy bowl intuitively' doesn't always happen for everyone - and that's ok! There's nothing wrong with knowing that if faced with salad and candy, you'll typically go for the candy; IMO, the appropriate response is to simply design your environment to make it easier to choose salad MOST of the time, while not completely restricting access to the candy.

 

For example, I can prep veg, whole grains, and pre-cook proteins at the beginning of the week, effectively 'setting myself up for success' in terms of eating the kind of foods that make me feel good, even when I'm feeling lazy. And then throughout the week my portion sizes and what I actually end up eating can vary depending on the daily groove - some days I eat LOTS, and other days I have a bowl of oatmeal and that's pretty much it. At the end of the week, most of the time I've consumed the appropriate veg & et al that I need to in order to maintain my health, but haven't felt like I was checking off boxes or restricting myself with a rigid 'plan' as such. It also means that on days where I DO snack mindlessly, I have good choices available to me - we can't be mindful all the time every day, I'm a big fan of sticking to a '80% good enough' approach.

 

Side note, I was reading the other day that taking a supplementary adaptogen like rhodiola or ashwagandha could maybe help to curb emotionally charged binge sessions (I've also noticed a very small but similar effect with theanine, which I stack with coffee) - more evidence to the idea that managing stress overall can also help with emotional eating challenges.

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20 minutes ago, Defining said:

simply design your environment

 

I've found that this isn't as simple as I would have wanted. For example, if I lived alone I would probably never bake any white flour bread, or buy it. But my wife told me as late as yesterday that she really wished she could just bake scones and bread etc whenever she wanted without having to think about how triggering it might be to me. So I have to let her bake sometimes, and she has to let me feel the calmness of not being triggered sometimes (i.e. not baking even if she wants to). And I wouldn't have cookies in the cupboards. But my wife wants to have it at home so that she can eats it whenever she wants. And I wouldn't have jam in the fridge, but the kids and wife wants to have that for the cheese they have for breakfast...

 

So when you have to take others into consideration it's not as easy as it might sound to design your environment

 

29 minutes ago, Defining said:

we can't be mindful all the time every day

 

We're not supposed to have to be mindful of what we eat at all. It should all be "automatic"/intuitive. Something we don't have to think about. We say that we're all perfect intuitive eaters as small children. And they're not "mindful" of what they eat, right? They just pick what the feel like they need.

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Wow! That's a lot to handle! No wonder you're struggling! Really sorry to hear about your granddad  
 
 
Thank you! He was 98 and sick for a while, he also died around Christmas, but it hit me yesterday:
To add to it all today a colleague from my died (her husband died last week, she probably took her own life, even if I'm not sure about it).
I booked psycotherpy tomorrow, just as a checkup. Can we reboot 2019?

Sent from my FIG-LX1 using Tapatalk

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Just now, Diadhuit said:

Thank you! He was 98 and sick for a while, he also died around Christmas, but it hit me yesterday:
To add to it all today a colleague from my died (her husband died last week, she probably took her own life, even if I'm not sure about it).
I booked psycotherpy tomorrow, just as a checkup. Can we reboot 2019?

 

Ouch! It just doesn't stop, does it?! I hope you and your therapist have a good talk tomorrow. Huggs Hug

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Recognizing eating from stress shows some strength. So does posting when there’s struggle!
 
I am not sure how I feel about the article. My husband tried some nutrition fixes for his cholesterol, and they frustrated him pretty badly. He seems healthier in mind and body now that he is taking medicine. Of course everyone needs to make their own choices when they get blood work back. There’s no one right path. 
 
I feel like I’m struggling with IE right now, too. It’s the consistency that I’m lacking. Most days I’m in tune to eating well. Emotions still take over on other days. I have a tricky month ahead of me with 3 Birthdays to celebrate in my house. Food has always been a big part of those celebrations. Food with extended family, close family, friends, the whole class at school.  Just a lot of food to enjoy...without overdoing. 
My GP says to try nutrition fix first, but didn't give me much guidance. I went to a nutritionist in the past, so I might take those advice back... there was no food restriction, but food 'encouragement' :)

Sent from my FIG-LX1 using Tapatalk

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8 minutes ago, Tobbe said:

We say that we're all perfect intuitive eaters as small children. And they're not "mindful" of what they eat, right? They just pick what the feel like they need.

 

Hmm. Is that true? I've seen some really fat/unhealthy kids. Don't know if they got that way because their parents only offered them poor choices, or the parents just let them eat whatever they wanted and they always went for what was tasty but not necessarily healthy. If kids are such good intuitive eaters, why is it a struggle to get them to eat vegetables?

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27 minutes ago, Jett said:

why is it a struggle to get them to eat vegetables?

 

We're talking 6 month old - 2 years old or something like that. Most small children of that age are still really curious about trying new food, and will (at least in periods) really like stuff like peas and boiled carrots :) 

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8 minutes ago, Tobbe said:

 

We're talking 6 month old - 2 years old or something like that. Most small children of that age are still really curious about trying new food, and will (at least in periods) really like stuff like peas and boiled carrots :) 

I miss those days when they just ate all the veggies and I was like "what are those other parents talking about, it's not hard to let them eat veggies".... 

47 minutes ago, Tobbe said:

I've found that this isn't as simple as I would have wanted. For example, if I lived alone I would probably never bake any white flour bread, or buy it. But my wife told me as late as yesterday that she really wished she could just bake scones and bread etc whenever she wanted without having to think about how triggering it might be to me. So I have to let her bake sometimes, and she has to let me feel the calmness of not being triggered sometimes (i.e. not baking even if she wants to). And I wouldn't have cookies in the cupboards. But my wife wants to have it at home so that she can eats it whenever she wants. And I wouldn't have jam in the fridge, but the kids and wife wants to have that for the cheese they have for breakfast...

It's not about excluding stuff, but including the stuff you like to eat. My husband has his own space for cookies, my kids have their own snack box and so do I. Mine is filled with dark chocolate and protein bars :) I mean I do sometimes buy or bake something for the whole family (mostly in the weekend) and we always have tons of fruit on the counter for anyone to grab. But overall everyone eats from their own box, this also allows for everyone to have their own favorites.

 

So just make sure their are healthy options for you to chose from and let everyone else do their own thing. 

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25 minutes ago, Tobbe said:

We're talking 6 month old - 2 years old or something like that. Most small children of that age are still really curious about trying new food, and will (at least in periods) really like stuff like peas and boiled carrots :) 

 

Oh, okay, I was thinking a bit older, up to about 6 years. Interesting that we lose whatever that instinct is so young.

 

1 hour ago, Tobbe said:

But my wife told me as late as yesterday that she really wished she could just bake scones and bread etc whenever she wanted without having to think about how triggering it might be to me. So I have to let her bake sometimes, and she has to let me feel the calmness of not being triggered sometimes (i.e. not baking even if she wants to). And I wouldn't have cookies in the cupboards. But my wife wants to have it at home so that she can eats it whenever she wants. And I wouldn't have jam in the fridge, but the kids and wife wants to have that for the cheese they have for breakfast...

 

So when you have to take others into consideration it's not as easy as it might sound to design your environment

 

This is definitely a challenge. It means you'll never have a trigger-food free environment. It seems like the real problem with this is that you feel like you "have to" have some of the jam/cookies/bread if they're around? I don't mean to be insensitive (I realize this is a loaded question) - but why not just leave the baked goods for the rest of your family until you truly desire some? Or is the problem that you constantly desire them?

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1 hour ago, Terah said:

It's not about excluding stuff, but including the stuff you like to eat. 

 

So just make sure their are healthy options for you to chose from and let everyone else do their own thing. 

Totally! It's not about not having the candy around - it's about also having a salad be available and equally (if not a bit more) convenient. ;) Adding in stuff, not taking it away from yourself.

 

1 hour ago, Tobbe said:

I've found that this isn't as simple as I would have wanted. 

I'm just being a brat and playing semantics here - but it is actually simple. It's just not easy. :P I think that most of us need to make concessions and compromises with the other people we live with, for different food choices & eating practices - that's why systems and routines are so important, to help reinforce the behaviours we'd like to see ourselves practicing.

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10 hours ago, Terah said:

It's not about excluding stuff, but including the stuff you like to eat.

 

10 hours ago, Terah said:

So just make sure their are healthy options for you to chose from and let everyone else do their own thing. 

 

9 hours ago, Defining said:

Totally! It's not about not having the candy around - it's about also having a salad be available and equally (if not a bit more) convenient.

 

10 hours ago, Jett said:

This is definitely a challenge. It means you'll never have a trigger-food free environment. It seems like the real problem with this is that you feel like you "have to" have some of the jam/cookies/bread if they're around? I don't mean to be insensitive (I realize this is a loaded question) - but why not just leave the baked goods for the rest of your family until you truly desire some? Or is the problem that you constantly desire them?

 

Thanks for all the responses! I'll try to address it all here.

 

I'm not looking to totally exclude everything. I just want it out of sight (and smell!) until I truly really crave it. Oftentimes I find that if the opportunity presents itself to have something tasty, I want it, even if it was something I didn't even think about just a second ago. Like if there is a plate of freshly baked chocolate chip cookies in the lunch room at work and you just come there to refill your cup of coffee. In a situation like that the temptation to grab a cookie might be too much for me, just because they are there. All I really wanted initially was some coffee, but because the cookies are there I suddenly want some of them anyway. And the bowl of fruit right next to the cookies don't tempt me the least in that situation. (Now that was a fictional scenario, because I work from home, don't eat chocolate and don't drink coffee, but I hope you get the idea.)

 

Another example could be that you go to the movies and buy a big container of popcorn to snack on while watching the movie. Did you really crave those popcorn before? Or did you buy them just because they were there, and it smelled really good of corn and butter? (And habit plays a big role here too.)  Would you have gone to the grocery store and bought popcorn to eat while watching the movie if you had arrived at the theater and all they had was water and carrot sticks?

 

What I'm trying to say, I guess, is that I don't like when a "want" is triggered just by sight and smell, not from some intuitive sense of my body lacking something.

 

I'd have no problem with the rest of my family having a box in the fridge, or their own cupboard, filled with whatever, as long as I don't have to see it. Out of sight, out of mind...

The problem is mostly when they're preparing that food, and putting it on the table to eat. Then it's tougher for me to prepare my salad and cook my chicken, or whatever. I would have been perfectly content with eating my salad and chicken, if that was what everyone else was having too. But if my wife comes home with a pizza box right at the moment I'm setting the table, then all of a sudden I'm not so content with the chicken and salad any more.

 

I'm not saying I want, or even can, live in an environment that's 100% trigger-food free. But it would be nice if my own home could be more of a safe zone. An environment that's more setup for success.

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1 hour ago, Tobbe said:

Another example could be that you go to the movies and buy a big container of popcorn to snack on while watching the movie. Did you really crave those popcorn before? Or did you buy them just because they were there, and it smelled really good of corn and butter? (And habit plays a big role here too.)  Would you have gone to the grocery store and bought popcorn to eat while watching the movie if you had arrived at the theater and all they had was water and carrot sticks?

When I go to the movies I'm always having peanut M&M's. I really like the taste, and since my oldest has a peanut allergy I can't have them in the house. I will be looking forward to this all day, and nothing else will taste as good as those M&M's will, so I naturally eat less and probaby try to add some more veggies. But if I go to the movies unexpectantly I either opt for a small portion of M&M's or even skipp it if I'm full from the rest of the day. So even in this situation you can listen to your body. Something that's very important for me is to remember I can have those M&M's next time I go to the movies. I'm not depriving myself or telling I shouldn't be eating them, but they won't taste as good if I'm already satisfied with the food I ate that day.

I hope this makes sense?

 

1 hour ago, Tobbe said:

But if my wife comes home with a pizza box right at the moment I'm setting the table, then all of a sudden I'm not so content with the chicken and salad any more.

This sounds really weird to me. I plan the dinners for the week and do groceries for them once a week. We just eat what we have on hand, and since I work from home I'm the one doing the cooking. It would be strange if I was there making a salad for the family that my husband would show up with pizza... Why would she do this? Didn't you tell her you would take care of dinner?

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There is this website lifeontellus.com that has helped me a lot with this (they have a free course). 

Thank you!!
Are you referring to the 45minutes masterclass or something else?

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6 minutes ago, Diadhuit said:


 


Thank you!!
Are you referring to the 45minutes masterclass or something else?

Sent from my FIG-LX1 using Tapatalk
 

It was a 5 day course, but I guess the 45 minute masterclass will cover the same stuff

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