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K8E80

Anterior pelvic tilt

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In doing some research based on my problem areas and knowing I don’t have the best posture, I’ve started to think I have anterior pelvic tilt. Pretty much means my core is weak and my muscles tight,and I collapse in my lower back sticking my butt out. When I realize I’m doing it I try to correct it but it’s not often enough. It’s leading to lower back pain hip and knee pain.

im trying to correct it and looking for advice on streatches and exercise.

 

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Knowing what you are doing right now for your workout and if you have tried anything to remedy it would help us help you.
For example playing around with different squat styles to activate your core in different ways. If your doing traditional back squats look into front squats or Zercher squats (my favorite for its core activation). In both cases having the bar in front of you will require a posture adjustment that you can mimic without the weight. Rock your hips forward and visualize pulling your chest upward when you keep your back straight as you push your heels down.
Take it easy on the weights, especially in zercher and have somebody watch you. The focus is form and the weight will follow.

Activate your core on a daily basis, this is not flexing your abs, visualize pulling your belly button towards your spine while you check your standing/sitting posture. You should be able to feel the 'band' of muscles on either side of your abs firm up just a little, these wrap around your back and are often culprit for back pain and posture issues.
Now try simple things with your core activated and your posture monitored: standing on one foot waving your arms, short duration planks, sitting on an exercise ball alternating planted feet, playing catch with a light medicine ball, playing catch with a light medicine while sitting on an exercise ball.
I know it sounds silly but these are stepping stones.

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Also lots of glute work can help wake things up - glute bridge, clam, birddog, fire hydrant, hip thrusts, etc.

 

Goblet squats have also been useful for me to practice/enforce good posture.

 

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I don’t really have a work out routine. I’m trying to build one. Last month I completed a 30 day yoga challenge. And fell off the workout wagon this month a bit. I’ve been doing some stretches in the morning for my legs. Simple lunges, one legged stretches, leg raises, short planks for core activation.

I work at a desk and try to keep good posture there as well, my seat is all properly adjusted (i think), I even have a a foot restcuz I’m a shortie. The worst thing I can’t seem to get good posture with at all is my hour drive to and from work.

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Does your workstation adjust so you can take a standing position? Will your employer provide it? Being able to vary your position from sitting to standing and back during work can help.
Keep up with the yoga it will help.
Simple lugnes and air squats are good. Don't over step and monitor posture throughout. To slowly take it up a level you can hold small weights while doing this either at your sides, curled to your shoulders or arms across your chest. Really pay attention to core tension and posture if you do the later two.
I also suggest you do some upper back work. This can roll your shoulders back and improve your upper posture which should encourage you to bring your hips forward to stabilize/ balance. (because shoulders back + hips back = Falling backwards)

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