• Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Rogue 6

About to join a gym, advice welcome.

Recommended Posts

So I've been avoiding joining a gym for a long time. The one everyone loves near me was pretty expensive ($500 a year). I managed to lose 50 pounds from just eating differently but then gained about 10 back over the holidays. On top of this, I need to have a surgery and my doctor wants me to lose weight for it. Well it turns out there is a cheaper gym even closer that I didn't know about.

 

Anyway life story over, if I join the gym I'm scared that I'll look like an idiot. I have absolutely no idea what I'm doing and have no idea what the names of the exercises or anything are called. I'm sure they will have people there to help out with stuff like that but I want a little knowledge before going in. I really haven't been to a gym since I was in high school, and even then it was just for a basic P.E. class.

 

My goal is strictly to lose weight. When I get down to my goal weight, I would then like to possibly work on building muscle. What are some tips you can give a beginner who is just joining the fitness world and is a little intimidated.

 

Apologies if this question isn't allowed or just doesn't fit in this area.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't even need to join a gym when starting out! NF has an accessible bodyweight routine you can try.

 

As you already know from your own experience, fat loss is all about designing/planning your food for that goal. But while losing fat, you also want to keep as much muscle as possible, and that's what the weight lifting is for. You'll also want some gentle regular movement to help burn calories; good choices include rowing, walking, hiking, swimming, etc. Eating a decent amount of protein can also help.

 

If you like the idea of going to a gym though, you can explore group classes, where the instructor will take you though a routine and make sure you're doing things safely - that way you don't need to worry about creating a whole plan right at the beginning of getting used to the new environment! Just start moving regularly, and add stuff as you become more comfortable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Rogue 6 said:

Anyway life story over, if I join the gym I'm scared that I'll look like an idiot. I have absolutely no idea what I'm doing and have no idea what the names of the exercises or anything are called. I'm sure they will have people there to help out with stuff like that but I want a little knowledge before going in.

 

Me too! I watched videos, read stuff, and got a friend to show me how to do the lifts I wanted to do. That made it easier (but still scary!) to step into the gym for the first time alone. 

But I can't really tell you what to look up first because I don't know what kind of thing you want to do. I think you should do lifting, but maybe you prefer to do steady state cardio, or circuits, or something else? I think you should pick something you think you'll enjoy, and give it a try. Any kind of movement can make a modest contribution to losing weight (if you don't overcompensate by eating more) but the thing people fail at most seems to be consistency. Doing something you like is the key to doing it repeatedly month in, month out.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Defining said:

You don't even need to join a gym when starting out! NF has an accessible bodyweight routine you can try.

 

As you already know from your own experience, fat loss is all about designing/planning your food for that goal. But while losing fat, you also want to keep as much muscle as possible, and that's what the weight lifting is for. You'll also want some gentle regular movement to help burn calories; good choices include rowing, walking, hiking, swimming, etc. Eating a decent amount of protein can also help.

 

If you like the idea of going to a gym though, you can explore group classes, where the instructor will take you though a routine and make sure you're doing things safely - that way you don't need to worry about creating a whole plan right at the beginning of getting used to the new environment! Just start moving regularly, and add stuff as you become more comfortable.

I would love working out at home but I feel like I don't have the disciple, or the room to do some stuff really. (small house, 4 other people) I had hoped that if I paid for a year membership then it would convince me to go since I'm paying for it if that makes sense. The gym is owned by the hospital in my town and includes classes and everything with the membership. It's a surprisingly good deal.

 

Maybe a gym would be a good reason to get out of the house. Maybe I can find a friend to do it with too. The body fitness stuff is a good idea though. I may have to see if I can replace the dumbbell rows (none here) and the walking lunges (not much room) with other things and try it for a few weeks before jumping into the gym. Thanks for the link!.

 

Honestly eating differently helped a lot, but now I'm at the point where I'm eating so few calories that I'm going over and starving at the end of the day. Unfortunately everyone I live with doesn't care about their health lol.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Rogue 6 said:

The gym is owned by the hospital in my town and includes classes and everything with the membership. It's a surprisingly good deal.

 

Honestly eating differently helped a lot, but now I'm at the point where I'm eating so few calories that I'm going over and starving at the end of the day. 

That gym sounds awesome! I tried using the 'I paid for it, so I have to go' motivation for myself, and fell flat on my face - that's kinda the fun part though, different strokes for different folks. Seems like a great opportunity for you to starting moving more, especially with the classes! :)

 

RE: Eating, you can maybe rejigger your meal plan to include more protein and vegetables to help stay feeling full - whole grains are another good option.

 

At any rate, welcome to the 'boards, looking forward to seeing you around!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, Defining said:

That gym sounds awesome! I tried using the 'I paid for it, so I have to go' motivation for myself, and fell flat on my face - that's kinda the fun part though, different strokes for different folks. Seems like a great opportunity for you to starting moving more, especially with the classes! :)

 

RE: Eating, you can maybe rejigger your meal plan to include more protein and vegetables to help stay feeling full - whole grains are another good option.

 

At any rate, welcome to the 'boards, looking forward to seeing you around!

Thanks for the help! Yeah I just know that if I try doing it all at home then it won't go well. That's also the reason I no longer study at home, my Netflix is constantly calling for me lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Rogue 6 said:

Honestly eating differently helped a lot, but now I'm at the point where I'm eating so few calories that I'm going over and starving at the end of the day. 


Ah. In that case, some careful thought may be needed. It may be time to focus increasingly on food quality, not just quantity, to manage satiety. And I believe low intensity cardio may be the best for not increasing hunger (personally, starting lifting made me ravenous, but everyone responds differently). Walking is ideal, I think. But also, maybe a two week break from restricting calories would do you some good? Apparently short breaks can reduce the down-regulating effects of prolonged calorie restriction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Harriet said:


Ah. In that case, some careful thought may be needed. It may be time to focus increasingly on food quality, not just quantity, to manage satiety. And I believe low intensity cardio may be the best for not increasing hunger (personally, starting lifting made me ravenous, but everyone responds differently). Walking is ideal, I think. But also, maybe a two week break from restricting calories would do you some good? Apparently short breaks can reduce the down-regulating effects of prolonged calorie restriction.

Thanks, I'll try that out as well.

 

I also started doing some of that body weight training mentioned above at home today and feel pretty good after it. The only things I'm unsure of: is a circuit how many times I do the exercises in a day or something else?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Rogue 6 said:

Thanks, I'll try that out as well.

 

I also started doing some of that body weight training mentioned above at home today and feel pretty good after it. The only things I'm unsure of: is a circuit how many times I do the exercises in a day or something else?


A circuit is where you do a few different exercises one after another, then rest. E.g. 10 pushups, 10 squats, 10 rows, 30 seconds rest. That's one circuit. I don't do circuits, because I do heavy weights and it would be pure madness to do different barbell movements back to back. But circuits are fine for bodyweight exercises. They keep your heart rate higher for longer with less rest in between movements. Good for aerobic capacity and developing ability to apply strength-whilst-fatigued.

 

The alternative to circuits is normal sets: do e.g. 10 pushups, rest, 10 pushups, rest, 10 pushups, rest (that's three sets of ten reps). Then move on to the next kind of movement. The benefit is you will perform better at each movement. But you don't care about performance or strength just now, you care about burning calories, if I understand. So circuits could add an extra level of toughness when you're ready to try them. But obviously choose a level that's appropriately challenging, not awful. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Harriet said:


A circuit is where you do a few different exercises one after another, then rest. E.g. 10 pushups, 10 squats, 10 rows, 30 seconds rest. That's one circuit. I don't do circuits, because I do heavy weights and it would be pure madness to do different barbell movements back to back. But circuits are fine for bodyweight exercises. They keep your heart rate higher for longer with less rest in between movements. Good for aerobic capacity and developing ability to apply strength-whilst-fatigued.

 

The alternative to circuits is normal sets: do e.g. 10 pushups, rest, 10 pushups, rest, 10 pushups, rest (that's three sets of ten reps). Then move on to the next kind of movement. The benefit is you will perform better at each movement. But you don't care about performance or strength just now, you care about burning calories, if I understand. So circuits could add an extra level of toughness when you're ready to try them. But obviously choose a level that's appropriately challenging, not awful. 

Oh okay that makes sense, I was doing 5 of the 6 on the PDF and thought it meant do all 6, rest, do all 6 again, repeat a 3rd time. Thanks for your help! I may start doing the circuits as I get more active and everything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Rogue 6 said:

Oh okay that makes sense, I was doing 5 of the 6 on the PDF and thought it meant do all 6, rest, do all 6 again, repeat a 3rd time. Thanks for your help! I may start doing the circuits as I get more active and everything.


If you mean the nerd fitness beginner bodyweight routine, it looks as though Steve intended this as a circuit - do all the movements, then rest. That said, you can do what you want. Rest in between movements if you need to. See what's doable for your current fitness level, then regularly increase the difficulty with either less rest or more repetitions of each movement. Or by doing the whole circuit more times. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Harriet said:


If you mean the nerd fitness beginner bodyweight routine, it looks as though Steve intended this as a circuit - do all the movements, then rest. That said, you can do what you want. Rest in between movements if you need to. See what's doable for your current fitness level, then regularly increase the difficulty with either less rest or more repetitions of each movement. Or by doing the whole circuit more times. 

Yeah, that's the one I meant, I should have been more specific. Sinc eI had never really heard of a circuit I wasn't sure what all of it meant lol

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
3 hours ago, Rogue 6 said:

Yeah, that's the one I meant, I should have been more specific. Sinc eI had never really heard of a circuit I wasn't sure what all of it meant lol

Circuit is just a series of movements repeated - often with rest periods in between each sequence. ;)

 

4 hours ago, Harriet said:

I don't do circuits, because I do heavy weights and it would be pure madness to do different barbell movements back to back.

:D  https://www.muscleandfitness.com/workouts/workout-routines/barbell-complex-program-shed-fat-part-1

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now