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MrsNoor

The weight that doesn't want to leave anymore

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Hello everyone,

 

I've been reading along here for a little while but not as a member so since I can't seem to find an answer / help for my problem I thought I'd sign up and see who has any ideas / tips / we've been there and done it & please don't give up kinda thing. 

 

A bit of background and history of me: In my teens I weighed a whopping 92kg at one point. How?? Simple eating delicious stacked sandwiches with 6 different topping plus a few extra helping of chips, chocolates and no exercise. My mom dragged me to the GP, got a major telling off and was put on a hypoglycemic diet (had sugar crash problems) and within 7 months I was back at 68kg and healthy as a horse.

Fast forward to now: I became a mom 8 months ago, couldn't be happier apart from one thing: I'm still way way waaay too heavy. But this time I can't go to the gym (like I did 2 years ago), I can't  do too much outside (nosy neighbours) and I can eat for 3. Or 4 or 5 people for that instance. I asked the GP and got told: just move 30 minutes a day and eat healthy. That doesn't work for me anymore. I've lost and gained 10 to 15 kg over the past 10 years and I've never been able to keep it off. Me and my husband looked at lots of the vegan / plant based movies and I decided to try it. I felt loads better without the milk and meats but I still don't know what else to do to get my weight off and fitting into a lower carb way of eating. I have one set of weights at home and a kettle belt plus a bouncy baby who wants to do all kinds of things but that's it. I live in the UK so walking outside in horrible weather doesn't bother me but isn't such a good idea with a small baby. 

 

What can I do now? I don't want to give up my new way of eating but I don't lose weight. I can eat 4 slices of toast and after 30 or 45 minutes be hungry again. I have no idea anymore after trying almost every diet and trying loads of new exercise routines.I tried Insanity Max 30 (30 minutes is easy if baby is asleep) and I gained a few kg of weight in 4 weeks that I stopped totally baffled!!! 

 

I would really really appreciate any ideas or help since I have no idea anymore what I can do at this moment to get healthy and fit again. I know losing weight isn't done overnight neither is getting fit but after struggling for months and months I really hope I can make permanent positive changes

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So, you didn't tell us your height, but I'll assume you're genuinely overweight and don't just want to lose the last few pounds for the sake of appearance. 

It seems to me the main problem is your hunger. Eating healthful, quality foods won't cause you to lose weight if you're eating enough for 3 people. But are you really eating healthfully? You said you're eating vegan, but vegan can be either highly processed and unhealthy, or reasonably healthy and based on whole foods. So are you, for example, eating pasta with store bought sauces and pre-made, packaged pseudo meats? Or are you eating home cooked dishes with fresh vegetables, legumes, tofu, etc?  I ask because highly processed foods tend not to promote satiety--feelings of satisfaction--whereas less processed whole foods do. Another important element in satiety is protein: are you getting enough? I mean something with every meal? Thirdly, fresh fruit and veg are important for satiety, you need them with every meal. Also, in my experience, processed carbs are very easy to overeat: I can eat far more than I need of pasta, noodles, white bread products and so on. It may seem difficult to get enough protein on a vegan diet. You may want to consider adding eggs, fish, or chicken. You can get pastured/free range/organic if sustainability and animal welfare are concerns. Lastly, while exercise is beneficial in many ways, it promotes hunger for many people. Maybe lay off the high intensity exercise for a little while until you get the hunger under control. Maybe try low intensity cardio like walking, as it doesn't cause as much hunger. One more thing. We can simply get used to larger portion sized and teach our brains to expect them. You may have to experience a little bit of hunger for a few weeks if you adjust your portion sized to be appropriate for your size. Related to this, many of us eat for entertainment and emotional reasons. I'm currently using a free app called "you eat" where I make a note of the reasons I ate and how I felt afterwards. It's helping me notice and  reduce eating from reasons other than hunger.

So: game plan to deal with hunger:
1. eat whole, less-processed foods like legumes, veg, tofu, nuts, seeds, fruit/avoid highly processed foods like noodles, breakfast cereal and pseudo meats

2. eat protein with every meal

3. eat fresh fruit or veg with every meal

4. swap high intensity exercise for low intensity cardio (for the time being)

5. notice what kinds of foods trigger overeating -is it refined carbs, or something else? take a note of danger foods and try not to keep them about the house

6. learn what portion sizes are appropriate for your size and activity level, and gradually decrease your portions to match

7. possibly try tracking or just noticing your emotions/reasons for eating in order to break the hold of emotional/boredom/tiredness eating.

Good luck.

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P.S. Don't feel you have to make all these changes at once. You may have more success making one small change every couple of weeks. That way you never get overwhelmed, and you can rely on the power of habit rather than motivation, which comes and goes.

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Hi Harriet thank you very very much for your reply and the good points you've mentioned there. 

I'm 171cm or 5ft 6in tall and hovering around the 92kg for weeks. And I'm mean nothing goes off, it's frustrating! 

I do eat whole foods, fruits and veggies but I'm finding myself stuck with options when I'm short on time especially with my little one. 

I actually had NO idea that high intensity exercise could cause hunger! Definitely something to keep in mind. 

I'm trying to keep carbs around 40grams, 80 of protein and not too much fat. Fibre is coming along anyway with all the veggies so I'm not too concerned about that. 

I cook most of my meals at home so my baby eats bits along and he can't have dairy products and I don't want to give too much sugar so young but sometimes the handy "fake" meats do come out of the freezer. 

I'm definitely going to sit down with the points you've mentioned and have a good think about them, maybe you know but are light weights considered high intensity workout or not? I do like to use them a few times a week.

Thanks very much again :) 

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59 minutes ago, MrsNoor said:

Hi Harriet thank you very very much for your reply and the good points you've mentioned there. 

I'm 171cm or 5ft 6in tall and hovering around the 92kg for weeks. And I'm mean nothing goes off, it's frustrating! 

I do eat whole foods, fruits and veggies but I'm finding myself stuck with options when I'm short on time especially with my little one. 

I actually had NO idea that high intensity exercise could cause hunger! Definitely something to keep in mind. 

I'm trying to keep carbs around 40grams, 80 of protein and not too much fat. Fibre is coming along anyway with all the veggies so I'm not too concerned about that. 

I cook most of my meals at home so my baby eats bits along and he can't have dairy products and I don't want to give too much sugar so young but sometimes the handy "fake" meats do come out of the freezer. 

I'm definitely going to sit down with the points you've mentioned and have a good think about them, maybe you know but are light weights considered high intensity workout or not? I do like to use them a few times a week.

Thanks very much again :)


40g carbs, 80g protein and not much fat... you said you can eat enough for three, but this doesn't sound like enough food for even one person. To illustrate with a comparison, my fitness pal tells me that for a total of 1720 calories, I could be eating 150g carbs, 130g protein, and almost 70g fat. I'm 5'5.5" and 67kg, and this is the calories they have allotted for maintaining that weight, assuming no exercise whatsoever (as it happens, my actual maintenance is more like 2300). So I'm now slightly worried that you are, in fact, not eating nearly enough. Do you have a rough idea how many calories you're eating? Eating much too little over a prolonged period can set in motion powerful hormonal and psychological resistance from the body, such as changes in the hormones that control hunger and satiety. This is important to figure out because your strategy for continuing weight loss should be different depending on whether you've been eating over or under your maintenance calories, by how much, and for how long.

 

P.S. healthy fats are important for the diet, for hormonal health, and can be satiating, so don't cut them out or restrict them too much. Can you and the baby have eggs? It could be a useful addition to an otherwise vegan diet. 

Regarding exercise and hunger, everyone responds differently. I've found that vigorous cardio and heavy weight training make me hungry, but I haven't noticed any effects from a little walking and bodyweight exercises. If you enjoy the light weights I would say keep doing them.

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Have you recorded your calories in a calorie counter? I agree with Harriet, that doesn't sound like very may total calories. Even if you don't want to track long term, keeping track for a couple of weeks can give you a good idea of what a serving size is.Besides being healthy, fats can also be satiating. I don't really think it is wise to try and go low carb and low fat, for pretty much the reason you are describing, you will be hungry.

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Hey @MrsNoor, speaking as a former vegan/vegetarian myself, I can say that it's VERY difficult to get 'enough' protein while trying to keep carbs low. Most plant based proteins also come with their fair share of starch & fibre. Also, the numbers just don't make much sense like that - 40g carbs + 80g protein = ~480kcal, and if you're also aiming for 'not much fat'....well, that's just not enough food. ;) 

 

Minimum daily recommendations (according to US standards) for protein intake is 0.8g/kg of bodyweight/day, but for fat loss while trying to preserve healthy lean mass (aka. muscle) should be closer to 1.2-2.2g/kg (~110-200g of protein/day). If you decided to accept a moderate carb load, then 100g protein is absolutely possible to do with a combination of lentils, beans, peas, whole grains, and vegetables. For reference, that's at least 3-4cups a day of a variety of legumes/pulses alone - even if you include some 'refined' bean options like tofu or seitan. It'd be a lot easier if you also tried to include fish and/or a protein supplement to your day, but even then, hitting that intake regularly WILL require some planning. On the plus side, if you're getting the majority of your calories from vegetables and beans, I'd be shocked if you still feel lots of hunger (there's a LOT of fiber in those choices :)).

 

Part of what Harriet was saying is that anything 'refined' is often sneakier about having a larger calorie count than expected. Stuff like bread can add more calories than you may like, and it's not really filling so it makes sense that you're hungry after eating it. For gradual but healthy fat loss, with the numbers that you've given above, I'd say that target daily caloric intake should probably be 1,500-1,600kcal/day. Even if you decide to ignore the protein recommendations I've suggested above, eating a vegan diet at 1,600kcal/day will probably go a long way for getting your fat loss jump-started.

 

And just as Elastigirl implied, you may benefit from keeping a food journal for a week or two, to see what your ACTUAL intake looks like  - it helps to set that baseline. Every time I've kept a food journal, it's been useful to highlight the foods that I was forgetting to 'count', since they were more from grazing/mindless eating rather than the meal plan I THOUGHT I was following. Start making it a habit to read labels as well - you may be shocked at how little protein the 'fake meats' actually contain - and the amount of 'filler ingredients' they do.

 

As an aside, sometimes our bodies will hold onto extra water when we start to work out, which is one of the many reasons I don't really like using weight as a tool for tracking progress. You may prefer something like using a tape measure to track your waist/hips/shoulder measurements, as a better long-term guide for what is and is not working for fat loss. In terms of ideas of regular movement, there's always old faithful: the NF bodyweight routine. And I'm a big fan of bundling up your baby and getting outside for those walks, even in miserable weather - it's good for both of you!

 

Welcome to the forum, will look forward to seeing you 'round the boards!

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First of all I would like to say a huge Thank You to the very helpful posts and ideas!! It's a big help instead the usual: eat less/ restrict lots, move more and if you don't something is wrong

I always always thought you had to be low carb to lose weight / to lose body fat!!!! Is that still true / does that work best? I love fruits and LOTS of them but I restrict those due to the high carb content. Along with fruits rice and chocolates are my biggest weakness for foods. I could stuff my face with rice, feel WAY too full and still look at rice the way I look at chocolate hahaha

The reason why I went low carb is because of that idea and I got thunder thighs that would make any hippo jealous. Seriously! Along with that I got a behind that would make an elephant look twice but a teeny tiny  waist that hardly expanded while I was carrying my bouncy baby! I thought low carb was the best way to go to lose that excess fat storage enough for 5 harsh winters. 

I looked at my daily intake (about a 1000 to 1100 calories yikes) and I made a decent calculation for my weight/ height and bmi: 

BMR: 1678 / body fat: 44% (never thought it this high) bmi: 31.8 and my targets are at the moment on: protein 25% / carbohydrates 40% and fat on 35% 

 

I think personally I want to decrease fat a bit and maybe increase carbs a bit but I'm not sure. I thought I knew a bit about foods after reading various books (The China Study, Forks over Knives etc) but I think my macros and some form of exercise are really needed. 

@Defining I saw you mentioned in your previous post that you used to eat vegan/ vegetarian can i ask why you changed it? @Elastigirl I've started my cronometer up since mfp gives me a headache so I'm back again fully with tracking @Harriet thank you as well for the great replies :smile-new: 

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56 minutes ago, MrsNoor said:

I always always thought you had to be low carb to lose weight / to lose body fat!!!! Is that still true / does that work best?

 

I looked at my daily intake (about a 1000 to 1100 calories yikes) and I made a decent calculation for my weight/ height and bmi: 

BMR: 1678 / body fat: 44% (never thought it this high) bmi: 31.8 and my targets are at the moment on: protein 25% / carbohydrates 40% and fat on 35% 


Ooof. 1000-1100 calories is not enough for a woman of 5'6". Please don't reduce calories even more. If you're truly eating this much and not losing weight, something is going wrong, maybe hormonally. I would see a professional. I would also make a meticulous diary of everything you eat for a couple of weeks so they believe you--people are very skilled at under-reporting what they eat so if you just walk in and say you're eating 1000 calories and not losing weight they may simply assume you're eating more calories than you realise.

 

So, this is beyond my experience and I'm not a dietician or nutritionist. But eating very low calories is obviously not working for you. It may be that your metabolism has down-regulated to adapt to very low calories. So instead of cutting calories further, maybe you'd like to try something else that can increase your metabolism. How about gradually increasing your calories while doing weights/strength training? If you want more detailed advice there are some articles I enjoyed reading on the "girls gone strong" blog about how repeatedly cutting calories doesn't work forever and what to do instead. 

You don't have to go low carb to lose weight. Low carb can help you cut calories because carbs make up a large portion of the standard modern diet. Cutting refined carbs can be useful because 1. we tend to overeat them and 2. they can mess with blood sugar. But some less processed, "complex" carbs can be useful for giving you enough energy to do effective exercise. People seem to do well with different amounts. Also, honestly, it's super hard and impractical to be low carb AND vegan because two of the most important vegan food groups--whole grains and legumes--are relatively high in carbs. Don't not eat these, they're important. 

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I figured that now as well, I always heard you've got your daily intake and if you want to lose weight you take a few hundred cals off of that number and voila :blue:

I've had tons of ups and downs in my weight and long long periods of time of not eating properly and working waaay too many hours with inadequate eating and to be honest I think I'm paying the price for that now especially after my I eat everything in sight pregnancy which left me craving TONS and TONS of bread :confusion: 

I had a gp bloodtest check and it did say my thyroid was a tad bit low but I've got gps here that rather not prescribe anything if it's not necessary, my baby is dairy intolerant and I had to go back at least 9 times to get the right formula and to get the right help.

 

Well It's good to hear that low carb isn't necessary and I definitely have a look at the girls gone strong, is that here on this forum @Harriet?? I think the weekend is the best place to write a few new plans, look at ideas and to read up a bit more where I can :D

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7 hours ago, MrsNoor said:

I always always thought you had to be low carb to lose weight / to lose body fat!!!! Is that still true / does that work best? I love fruits and LOTS of them but I restrict those due to the high carb content. Along with fruits rice and chocolates are my biggest weakness for foods. I could stuff my face with rice, feel WAY too full and still look at rice the way I look at chocolate

It's never been true that you have to eat low carb to lose fat. Like Harriet said, it usually just forces people to cut out the shitty refined foods (aka empty calories) that are most commonly overindulged. Added sugars are sneaky, and end up in all sorts of prepared foods that you wouldn't expect.

 

Rice is tasty, but probably not a good choice when you're trying to lose fat, since it's pretty much 100% starch with little to no nutrients. To be honest, I'd probably not eat ANY grains at first, because you'll get more than enough carbs from your protein sources anyway if you're following a vegan plan. Cutting out grains and refined carbs (ie. starch & sugars, as opposed to the 'incidental' carbs that come with veg intake) is still a good choice during fat loss to prevent overeating higher calorie foods, but that's not the same thing as going 'low carb'.

 

Don't get me wrong, I really like whole grains (whole oat groats is a personal favourite), but the nutrient/macro:calorie ratio isn't helpful when you have a limited caloric allowance. Fruit is great, but again I'd probably limit them to no more than 2 portions a day - and make sure it's not canned fruit, since the syrups tend to have added sugars. You can try just plain baking cocoa powder in hot water for chocolate cravings. 

 

7 hours ago, MrsNoor said:

I looked at my daily intake (about a 1000 to 1100 calories yikes)

 

I'd still recommend keeping a food journal for a week or two - and MEASURE EVERYTHING. Weighing it is best, but you can also use volume measures if that's easier. I'm NOT saying that you'll forever need to measure out every single thing that goes into your mouth, but it's a good tool especially when first starting out. Don't forget liquid calories either, like sugar/milk in tea, sodas, etc. No eyeballing portions, because otherwise it's too easy for us to underestimate how much we're eating. Eg.

 

2098583852_55e902_797013f4e4934e75a1f5487ab923e316mv2_d_2048_1536_s_2.png.ffdd45827c256697831c4892cbbdf045.png

 

I say this in as a supportive and well-meaning way as possible - but it's highly unlikely that you're only taking in 1,100kcal/day while maintaining a weight of 92kg. Even taking into account the potential of some adaptive thermogenesis (the most common 'cause' blamed for 'starvation mode') and/or a slightly underactive thyroid, the 500-800kcal deficit would (in the vast majority of cases) still cause you to be losing weight. 

 

Now, mind you, if that deficit is causing you to lose ~0.5kg/week, and your body is retaining some extra water in response, then yeah, your scale isn't going to budge. But if you keep on, the numbers will adjust, typically within a few weeks. Again, that's why I like keeping girth measurements as well, and possibly even a mood journal to help track how you're feeling.

 

Your metabolism doesn't exactly 'down regulate', at least not in the sense of what most people imagine. It's often more just that you're feeling tired so you move/fidget less - that's why having step goals can work so well for some people, since it forces them to maintain consistent non-exercise physical activity levels. A change in your daily physical activity can cause a fairly significant difference. What can also happen is that your body burns marginally fewer calories by becoming more efficient! There are dozens of other mechanisms that could contribute to a reduction in energy expenditure while losing weight, but with the exception of some outliers in the data available (and the individual responses are QUITE variable) I wouldn't expect that effect to be more than 200-300kcal for most people (numbers off the top of my head, can't find the studies I'm thinking of right now). Not counting the 'fidget calories' I mentioned - those can be as much as 300-800kcal/day for some people.

 

Adding resistance training and eating sufficient protein can help to preserve muscle mass during fat/weight loss - which both improves your overall body composition, in addition to mitigating some of the reduction in energy expenditure. For example, if two women weighed 65kg and one had 20% bodyfat and the other had 35% bodyfat, their daily calorie needs would be different by ~250kcal/day, not counting additional calories burned during/from exercise.

 

There's also some really cool new info that suggests that intermittent dieting - two weeks on, two weeks at 'maintenance' - can also prevent some of the negative effects from prolonged caloric deficits.

 

7 hours ago, MrsNoor said:

 

@Defining I saw you mentioned in your previous post that you used to eat vegan/ vegetarian can i ask why you changed it?

I added animal products back in because I wanted to increase my protein intake and reduce calories to lose fat, and I couldn't do it with lentils alone. Or I should say: I couldn't do it as QUICKLY or as well just with vegan protein sources. These days, probably half of my protein intake on a normal day will come from whey protein powder - but I also digest dairy very easily. It's not the least expensive option, but it IS the best balance between calories and cost for my own needs. Even now, I only eat meat (chicken or red meat) once or twice a month, and fish about the same. I'll eat eggs probably 2-3x a week, but for myself I also only buy pastured/free range/grass fed animal proteins to satisfy my own ethical concerns on the subject.

 

I want to emphasise here: losing fat isn't necessarily just about eating LESS, but also eating BETTER. Obviously maintaining a caloric deficit is important in order to lose weight, but a 1,500kcal diet can look very different depending on the KIND of foods you're eating. EG. a cream-based curry meal could be 1,000 calories just on it's own - vs eating 5 portion of veg and 4cups of beans/lentils for a similar count. Prepared foods, stuff like rice and bread, added sugars, and so on can all increase your caloric intake without adding nutritional value. Those different choices will also change your hunger levels quite a bit differently.

 

It may be that you'll need to set out a meal plan, and do some batch cooking for easy 'instant meals' available when life is busy. I do big batches of curried lentils and bean chili, for example - and then can just pull out a portion at a time, along with some frozen vegetables, to heat up and have a healthy satisfying meal even on busy days. Frozen veg & berries are awesome 'quick meal' additions for extra bulk & nutrients without having to cook lots of stuff all at once. And be sure to watch the amount of cooking oils/fats you use as well - it's again very easy to underestimate how much you're using, and it can add up quickly since 1g of fat is 9kcal, instead of the 4kcal for carbs/protein.

 

Other things like getting enough sleep, managing stress, staying hydrated, etc. can all also affect the speed and efficacy of your fat loss. At any rate, I'm sure you'll find some meal plans/systems/habits that work for you, it's just a matter of experimenting for what fits your own lifestyle. Bear in mind, I'm not a doctor, dietician, or health professional - so feel free to take everything I type with a  grain of salt. ;)

 

 

'Hope some of this helped!

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4 hours ago, MrsNoor said:

I think I'm paying the price for that now especially after my I eat everything in sight pregnancy which left me craving TONS and TONS of bread :confusion: 

 

Well It's good to hear that low carb isn't necessary and I definitely have a look at the girls gone strong, is that here on this forum @Harriet?? I think the weekend is the best place to write a few new plans, look at ideas and to read up a bit more where I can :D


Even though low carb isn't necessary, I would certainly avoid foods you can't help overeating. I avoid pasta most of the time, for example, because I just can't be trusted with it. Girls gone strong is an independent blog with compassionate advice on diet and encouragement for women who lift, just google it and you'll find it. P.S. It's really hard to overeat beans. I make my own "baked beans" so I can control how much salt and sugar goes in. Lowish in calories but hugely satisfying and much tastier than those goopy tinned ones you get at the shop. 

 

15 minutes ago, Defining said:

Your metabolism doesn't exactly 'down regulate', at least not in the sense of what most people imagine. It's often more just that you're feeling tired so you move/fidget less - that's why having step goals can work so well for some people, since it forces them to maintain consistent non-exercise physical activity levels.


For clarity: I've read from a few sources that seemed sensible (though who knows, there is a lot of controversy and uncertain in nutritional science) that prolonged calorie deficits can cause ghrelin and maybe cortisol to increase, and leptin and NEAT to decrease, plus of course the decrease in TDEE that comes from having a lower weight, and the increasing psychological fixation with food. That's all I meant by down-regulation. It might be the wrong term.

I was also surprised that it would be possible to maintain 90kg on 1000 calories. To what extent do you think it's possible for someone to reduce their TDEE with yo-yo dieting? 

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I'd hesitate to speculate on any individual response to a prolonged caloric deficit. Not only are the results highly variable, but SO MANY of nutritional studies depend on self-reported intake. Lots of the studies on hormones are often done with fasting models as well, rather than chronic caloric deficit. Not to mention how difficult this stuff is to actually measure in the first place.

 

This is an example of the variations you can see between different individuals on the same kind of diet:

m_990fig3.gif.6dfea1543d171bef9defef438ef2c3d8.gif

 

So. It kinda depends. ;)

 

And yes, ghrelin and cortisol can absolutely increase when you're on a diet, and leptin levels & resistance will also change - as well as insulin responses. No arguments there. That's why sleep and stress management are so important, in addition to including exercise in any fat loss plan - eating more protein also helps. But those tend to have less to do with the calories burned, so much as appetite and cravings (not entirely, but for the most part).

 

BAT (aka brown fat) also changes our resting energy expenditure by how much body heat it actually produces.

 

I've seen speculation of a difference between 5% to 25% of TDEE depending on the individual's response, but that's also highly dependent on both the duration and level of deficit. My own estimate of ~200-300kcal 'average' is based on the MATADOR study, which while it was for obese males, is a better quality study because the researchers actually provided the food to participants! There's another study I'm thinking of that was done with obese females that regained their weight, but I just can't find it right now.

 

But yeah, our bodies are (*&^ing complicated, and no one really knows how it all works together. :P 

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@Harriet thank you for the girls gone strong site, it looked really good and I hope to read more there in the coming few days. @Defining I loved the peanut butter picture!! I couldn't actually see the difference between the 2 to be honest so I've been tracking very strictly yesterday and the day before. Yesterday (Saturday) as a cleaned up / new plan of eating day but I had one big worry still. After doing all my house cleaning, gardening and light weight routine I was shocked at how many calories I burned. Normally I would have tons of fat, as low carb as possible and medium protein on a normal day. But now while trying to up my carbs & lower my fats I'm really struggling and realising how much fat I used to eat (think spoons of peanut butter, pistachios, a few almonds & a few glasses of my dairy free milk) and I only got half of the calories in on my day that I was allowed, while feeling absolutely stuffed to the max with veggies, chick peas and a nice home made sauce.

 

Any idea where I can find more info to up my cals without upping my fats like mad? I tried YouTube for inspiration but it's too much out there. Are there special places here on the forum that I otherwise could ask /should post? Should I adjust my macros of try for longer to see how I get along? Since going whole foods plant based / vegan I feel tons better and see a better result as well body wise it's just that I still have worries macro wise. 

 

I think with all the super low  calories that I've been eating plus the tons and tons of (bad) fats and the constant bad habits as well that I've had that it's going to be difficult to get my body sorted out and to be healthy again. Healthy as in lower body fat percentage and a healthy weight (with a nice bit of muscle of course!!) 

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3 hours ago, MrsNoor said:

@Harriet thank you for the girls gone strong site, it looked really good and I hope to read more there in the coming few days. @Defining I loved the peanut butter picture!! I couldn't actually see the difference between the 2 to be honest so I've been tracking very strictly yesterday and the day before. Yesterday (Saturday) as a cleaned up / new plan of eating day but I had one big worry still. After doing all my house cleaning, gardening and light weight routine I was shocked at how many calories I burned. Normally I would have tons of fat, as low carb as possible and medium protein on a normal day. But now while trying to up my carbs & lower my fats I'm really struggling and realising how much fat I used to eat (think spoons of peanut butter, pistachios, a few almonds & a few glasses of my dairy free milk) and I only got half of the calories in on my day that I was allowed, while feeling absolutely stuffed to the max with veggies, chick peas and a nice home made sauce.

 

Any idea where I can find more info to up my cals without upping my fats like mad? I tried YouTube for inspiration but it's too much out there. Are there special places here on the forum that I otherwise could ask /should post? Should I adjust my macros of try for longer to see how I get along? Since going whole foods plant based / vegan I feel tons better and see a better result as well body wise it's just that I still have worries macro wise. 

 

I think with all the super low  calories that I've been eating plus the tons and tons of (bad) fats and the constant bad habits as well that I've had that it's going to be difficult to get my body sorted out and to be healthy again. Healthy as in lower body fat percentage and a healthy weight (with a nice bit of muscle of course!!) 


I don't think there's anything wrong with eating more healthy fats if it fits your calories. But I also wouldn't be eating more than I need to feel full, especially if my goal were to lose weight. I'm a little confused about your actual calories though: are you keeping them at the same level they've been at so far? I think you said that was about 1100cal per day. Given what defining told us about the likeliness of losing weight on such a low-cal diet, it would be worth double checking if your daily intake truly is 1100 calories. Maybe it would be good to spend a couple of weeks tracking (keeping in mind the ease of mis-measuring, like in the peanut butter photo) and see if your weight stays the same. BTW is the 1100 net calories after exercise? Keep in mind that exercise calculators may dramatically overestimate calories burned. I would choose my calorie level without regard to exercise, and adjust it based on whether I were losing, gaining, or maintaining weight after a few weeks. 

For more detailed guidance and support, why not join a guild here on nerd fitness and do the 4-week challenges? They're much more active than the other boards, and you can get ongoing advice and support from other people who are also figuring out the kinks in their fitness journey.

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If you enjoy eating fat, and it fits into your activity levels and goals, then eat fat. As long as you're getting in enough protein (and I still think that you'd be best served by aiming for at least 100-150g minimum/day), then the rest of your macro intake between carbs v fat doesn't really matter - more likely that the intake will be incidental, 'attached' to your protein sources, rather than needing to add more, in my experience.

 

I'll agree with Harriett again - you should be calculating your Total Daily Energy Expenditure (https://tdeecalculator.net/result.php?s=imperial&g=female&age=35&lbs=202&in=66&act=1.2&f=1) without considering physical activity at first. Don't 'trust' fitbit/fitness tracker numbers for 'calories burned', they are notoriously inaccurate. Set your deficit between 300-500kcal/day under the initial calculated TDEE as 'sedentary', and then wait to see how much weight loss that actually results in. The best way to figure out YOUR numbers is to experiment with how YOUR body is responding to different intakes, rather than relying on calculators or estimates.

 

In terms of being 'healthy' - your GP gave you good advice. Eat well (enough protein, enough kcal, veggies, stay hydrated, avoid sugar) and move deliberately for at least 30min every day. If you would like to avoid losing muscle during the fat loss process (or at least, not losing more than is absolutely necessary), include some resistance training and get your protein levels up. It's as simple (albeit not necessarily 'easy') as that.

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