• Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Harriet

Harriet's Tiny Habits Continued

Recommended Posts

41 minutes ago, Grumble said:

I'm also under the assumption that all chocolate consumed is dark chocolate because its the best.


Hisssssss. Bitter!

 

Also, I got extremely tired after the workout AND a snack AND lunch. Eh. I've had really bad fatigue for years and things are getting better since I took up lifting, so this is actually an improvement. Better to be sleepy for a couple of hours than flat and demotivated all day every day. 

 

43 minutes ago, Grumble said:


Ooh thank you. Have just read. I want to highlight two things for your entertainment: 


1. "Any regular gym-goer will recognise the salty taste of sweat after a good hard workout."
...

...

... I don't taste myself after working out. Am I doing it wrong? 

 

And 2. under the list of "surprising high sodium foods":

"Stock cubes - Who’d have guessed that this harmless little cube used to add flavour would be on this list"


...Where's the surprise, Bob? I was expecting a surprise, and you let me down. Everyone understands that stock cubes are salty. Like my tears when I realised there was going to be no surprise.

Anyway, given that I eat mostly home cooked meals and clif bars, it's possible I don't get much salt. I will look into this. Thank you!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

P.S. Happy News

I finally finished a first draft of the short story* I've been working on with my daily writing habit, and I submitted it to my informal writing group for critique. I'm pretty happy with it. I hope someone will read it despite the length. It's 14 pages and roughly 9500 words. I think the others are mostly writing flash fiction at under 2000 words. But anyway, I'm a writer! No matter if anyone likes or reads my story! I write! Therefore, I am a writer! 

*It's about a guy who works for a company that makes teleportation devices. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Harriet said:


Hisssssss. Bitter!

come on please GIF

13 minutes ago, Harriet said:

Also, I got extremely tired after the workout AND a snack AND lunch. Eh. I've had really bad fatigue for years and things are getting better since I took up lifting, so this is actually an improvement. Better to be sleepy for a couple of hours than flat and demotivated all day every day. 

I'd say there's medical stuff there, but I'm no medical type person so I will refrain from any advice, anecdotal or otherwise.

13 minutes ago, Harriet said:


Ooh thank you. Have just read. I want to highlight two things for your entertainment: 


1. "Any regular gym-goer will recognise the salty taste of sweat after a good hard workout."
...

...

... I don't taste myself after working out. Am I doing it wrong? 

Steve Carell The Office GIF - SteveCarell TheOffice ThatsWhatSheSaid GIFs

13 minutes ago, Harriet said:

And 2. under the list of "surprising high sodium foods":

"Stock cubes - Who’d have guessed that this harmless little cube used to add flavour would be on this list"


...Where's the surprise, Bob? I was expecting a surprise, and you let me down. Everyone understands that stock cubes are salty. Like my tears when I realised there was going to be no surprise.

I don't recommend eating them by themselves.

 

13 minutes ago, Harriet said:

Anyway, given that I eat mostly home cooked meals and clif bars, it's possible I don't get much salt. I will look into this. Thank you!

Welcome!

 

8 minutes ago, Harriet said:

P.S. Happy News

I finally finished a first draft of the short story* I've been working on with my daily writing habit, and I submitted it to my informal writing group for critique. I'm pretty happy with it. I hope someone will read it despite the length. It's 14 pages and roughly 9500 words. I think the others are mostly writing flash fiction at under 2000 words. But anyway, I'm a writer! No matter if anyone likes or reads my story! I write! Therefore, I am a writer! 

*It's about a guy who works for a company that makes teleportation devices. 

Sounds like a union gig. Poor sap.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Grumble said:

https://www.dwfitnessfirst.com/inside-track/nutrition/salt-and-exercise-why-salt-is-an-essential-part-of-your-workout/ Even with NHS references

Dark chocolate has some good, milk chocolate not so much. I'm also under the assumption that all chocolate consumed is dark chocolate because its the best.

 

46 minutes ago, Harriet said:


Hisssssss. Bitter!

 

If it's bitter, you're eating the wrong dark chocolate. ;)

 

Yes I know that might have sounded condescending, but really, there is dark chocolate out there that is rich, savory, full of flavor, flavonids and antioxidants, and is not bitter. Look for Ghirardelli, Godiva, or GuyLian in your local, well stocked, grocery store. Start small/slow, and don't go straight for the 80% unsweetened stuff. Start with the 50% or 60%, and if they are truffles or have some kind of flavored filling, that will help ease the transition as well. Yes, those two varieties have sugar in them. But you're not going to eat 15 of them at once. You eat one or two, so the total amount of sugar won't be that high in the end. And then gradually go darker and less sweet until you have worked your way up to this marvel of deliciousness:

 

excellence-dark-chocolate-bar-85-percent

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, scalyfreak said:

If it's bitter, you're eating the wrong dark chocolate. ;)

 

Yes I know that might have sounded condescending, but really, there is dark chocolate out there that is rich, savory, full of flavor, flavonids and antioxidants, and is not bitter. Look for Ghirardelli, Godiva, or GuyLian in your local, well stocked, grocery store. Start small/slow, and don't go straight for the 80% unsweetened stuff. Start with the 50% or 60%, and if they are truffles or have some kind of flavored filling, that will help ease the transition as well. Yes, those two varieties have sugar in them. But you're not going to eat 15 of them at once. You eat one or two, so the total amount of sugar won't be that high in the end. And then gradually go darker and less sweet until you have worked your way up to this marvel of deliciousness:

 

excellence-dark-chocolate-bar-85-percent

Oooh, time to start adding chocolate to my grocery list again!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, scalyfreak said:

 

 

If it's bitter, you're eating the wrong dark chocolate. ;)

Amen!

3 minutes ago, scalyfreak said:

Yes I know that might have sounded condescending, but really, there is dark chocolate out there that is rich, savory, full of flavor, flavonids and antioxidants, and is not bitter. Look for Ghirardelli, Godiva, or GuyLian in your local, well stocked, grocery store. Start small/slow, and don't go straight for the 80% unsweetened stuff. Start with the 50% or 60%, and if they are truffles or have some kind of flavored filling, that will help ease the transition as well. Yes, those two varieties have sugar in them. But you're not going to eat 15 of them at once. You eat one or two, so the total amount of sugar won't be that high in the end.

Alter Eco Organic Dark Chocolate 47% Cocoa Coconut Toffee -- 2.82 oz

 

Alter Eco Organic Dark Chocolate Salted Brown Butter -- 2.82 oz

Two of my absolute favorites. The dark coconut toffee is a little higher is sugar so it shows up less in my shopping cart when I go to the store. But it's a good training bar.

 

3 minutes ago, scalyfreak said:

And then gradually go darker and less sweet until you have worked your way up to this marvel of deliciousness:

 

excellence-dark-chocolate-bar-85-percent

I currently have the 90% in my freezer. It's delicious.

Then there's this, it's like the secret unlocked boss you can only find after you have officially leveled up from git gud

Michel Cluizel, 99% dark chocolate bar 30g

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

lenoir_extra-146x300.jpg

 

My Prescious in all ways. And obscenely expensive where I currently live.... Obtaining these is going to be a high level reward at some point in my challenges.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hahaha. Thanks for all the chocolate wisdom, friends. I did eat lindt dark chocolate in the past and found it bitter. But starting with a lower percentage sounds like a solid plan. Maybe I'll adjust and then become addicted, like I did to tea without sugar. In safeway, everything looks brightly coloured and disgusting with weird names. At the nice market where I get my produce, though, I found a 62% chocolate bar with rosemary and promises of quality. Seems like a good place to start. We'll see how it goes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Harriet said:

I found a 62% chocolate bar with rosemary and promises of quality.

 

Link, please. Rosemary in chocolate holds great potential...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, scalyfreak said:

Rosemary in chocolate holds great potential...

 

P.S. I took a chocolate making workshop with my husband a while ago in Berlin. I think it was a birthday gift. We got to choose what flavours to put in our little chocolates. I think I chose rosemary and lavender, among others. Mmmm. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Harriet said:

 

P.S. I took a chocolate making workshop with my husband a while ago in Berlin. I think it was a birthday gift. We got to choose what flavours to put in our little chocolates. I think I chose rosemary and lavender, among others. Mmmm. 

 

That sounds incredible. When I make hot chocolate I melt a high percent dark bar into milk, then add ginger, cinnamon, some chili powder... heaven!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Harriet said:

 

P.S. I took a chocolate making workshop with my husband a while ago in Berlin. I think it was a birthday gift. We got to choose what flavours to put in our little chocolates. I think I chose rosemary and lavender, among others. Mmmm. 

 

8 minutes ago, scalyfreak said:

 

That sounds incredible. When I make hot chocolate I melt a high percent dark bar into milk, then add ginger, cinnamon, some chili powder... heaven!

 

*takes all the notes*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, scalyfreak said:

 

That sounds incredible. When I make hot chocolate I melt a high percent dark bar into milk, then add ginger, cinnamon, some chili powder... heaven!


Meow! Actually, the reason I like milk chocolate is the milk, not the sugar. I wouldn't mind if they had less sugar. So making my own hot chocolate sounds like it could be gorgeous... but I'm not sure I'd be able to stop at a reasonable amount - liquids are so easy to have more of.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Grumble said:

I'd say there's medical stuff there, but I'm no medical type person so I will refrain from any advice, anecdotal or otherwise.


No doctor has ever been able to give me any help on this. There's nothing wrong with my bloodwork (no, auto correct, not "bloodworm" WTF?). They don't know what causes it, they don't know if it is a symptom of depression or even the cause. The GP I had as a child and young adult said she could diagnose me with chronic fatigue, but that she wouldn't, because it is a "basket" people put themselves in which allows them to make excuses for themselves. Turns out doctors don't even know what chronic fatigue is, anyway. The only things that have ever helped are common sense things I did myself: diet, sleep, walking, lifting, various techniques for managing the anxiety and depression. It's just one of the reasons I only go to doctors when absolutely necessary (except the therapist, she's alright) and prefer to keep my own counsel whenever possible. Anyway, the good news is I'm immensely stronger than I was a few years ago. So a bit of afternoon fatigue is not going to stop me from doing ALL the things.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, because I'm doing ALL the things, here's my now finished sweater. It's knit in a DK/light worsted weight yarn, so it's a heavy fabric, but I think the shaping stops it from being a chunky garment. Sadly, it's suddenly too warm to wear it now winter has fled. What's that, you say? Knit another sweater in a sport or sock weight yarn for spring? What an excellent idea! Cables on the back, too.

IMG_5677.jpg.bd4be07ff351c820048fa22657877286.jpgIMG_5674.thumb.jpg.4b8df97bf9cbe6a3d90b465366519e02.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Harriet said:


Meow! Actually, the reason I like milk chocolate is the milk, not the sugar. I wouldn't mind if they had less sugar. So making my own hot chocolate sounds like it could be gorgeous... but I'm not sure I'd be able to stop at a reasonable amount - liquids are so easy to have more of.

 

The trick to making proper homemade hot chocolate from melting a bar, is to heat it very slowly over low heat for a very long time, while stirring slowly. When it has thickened to the point you have to use some force to keep stirring, and sipping becomes a challenge, you can start thinking about sipping it with the help of a small spoon. The spices go in as early as possible, so they can really melt into the chocolate.

 

I am totally making this tonight. It can be dinner. :)

 

Love the color of that sweater!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hold up, I'm still at chicken breasts, cuz I've found the solution.

 

1) Make brine: 1/4 Kosher salt, 1/4 brown sugar, 3 cups water... that make enough to soak about 5 lbs of chicken breasts.

2) Butterfly your chicken breasts... I actually cut them diagonally in the thick parts from underneath to make them thinner...

3) Tenderize them... you can use one of those mallets, but I just punch them. Literally, with my fist. It's more fun that way.

4) Soak them in the brine for 3-4 hours.

5) Preheat a generous amount of oil ( I use olive) in a skillet. Hot enough that when you put the chicken in it's fuckin' sizzlin'. We're not deep frying, but cover the bottom of the pan well.

6) Cook the chicken on one side until the meat no longer sticks to the pan. At that point it will be nice and brown. Usually you'll see the edges are cooked and it's only pink on top in the thickest parts.

7) Flip the chicken over to finish it off. Just get the rest of the pink out. Should take no more than half the time of the first side.

 

This is the best way to prepare chicken breasts. I suspect you can also grill it similarly, but I haven't tried it yet. The brine is key. It holds the moisture in while you're cooking it with enough heat to get those Maillard reactions* going. The sugar provides additional substrate for more Maillard reactions.

 

*amino acids + sugar + heat --> flavor

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Curl Brogo said:

Hold up, I'm still at chicken breasts, cuz I've found the solution.


Nice! Adding to my mental wiki of cooking techniques. How do you get it dry after the brine? 

 

1 hour ago, Curl Brogo said:

3) Tenderize them... you can use one of those mallets, but I just punch them. Literally, with my fist. It's more fun that way.


Savage. I love it. I am absolutely trying this technique. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, scalyfreak said:

When it has thickened to the point you have to use some force to keep stirring, and sipping becomes a challenge, you can start thinking about sipping it with the help of a small spoon.


Is this pudding? This is pudding, isn't it. Damn, I want pudding. 

 

3 hours ago, scalyfreak said:

Love the color of that sweater!


Thanks! In person it's a sort of blackened teal. It's super nice because the fibres (white merino, brown masham, black mohair) take the dye differently, creating a not-quite-uniform colour. 

 

1 hour ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

That sweater is incredible. Sweaters are awesome, but I so rarely wear them. I'm very warm natured, so even when the temps are in the 50's a sweater is too much for me.


Thank you! So, 50's is 10-15 celsius, I think. Chilly to somewhat cold, I guess. I would say that's light sweater or hoodie weather. But I noticed since starting lifting, I warm up more quickly as long as I'm moving, so I end up in just a sweaty t-shirt during my walks, even if it's 12 degrees. I get just as cold when I'm staying still, though.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Harriet said:


Is this pudding? This is pudding, isn't it. Damn, I want pudding. 

 

It is not pudding. More like heavy/thick cake batter.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whee! The tip test was fun, and I got some feedback, mostly positive. Looks like the test for yellow belt in May is pretty much in the bag. 

Hmmm. Now that I've submitted my short story to my group for critique I have to start work on something new. I've been working on the teleport story for weeks so it feels weird. I might need a bit longer than my usual 15 minutes to have a think about it and set up. I'm actually super pleased with it and I want my next one to be as much fun, as well. I also need to look at online markets to submit to. My first teacher said we should basically submit all our work, starting straight away, and not wait to be "good enough", because that's a waste of time, and also being rejected happens to everyone, even good writers, so we might as well get used to it. 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

THAT SWEATER! Gosh, I just love admiring the outcomes of crafting hobbies. :D 

 

13 minutes ago, Harriet said:

Hmmm. Now that I've submitted my short story to my group for critique I have to start work on something new. I've been working on the teleport story for weeks so it feels weird. I might need a bit longer than my usual 15 minutes to have a think about it and set up. I'm actually super pleased with it and I want my next one to be as much fun, as well. I also need to look at online markets to submit to. My first teacher said we should basically submit all our work, starting straight away, and not wait to be "good enough", because that's a waste of time, and also being rejected happens to everyone, even good writers, so we might as well get used to it. 

Haha, I like that strategy! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.