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Jett

Jett gets his swole on

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2 hours ago, Grumble said:

My rest times are no more than 90 seconds unless I'm testing for a Rep max. I don't like spending hours in the gym and can generally get in and out in 45-50 minutes.


Oh wow. That sounds marvellously convenient, but I think I would fail a lot more of my lifts if I only waited for 90 seconds. 

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18 minutes ago, Harriet said:


Oh wow. That sounds marvellously convenient, but I think I would fail a lot more of my lifts if I only waited for 90 seconds. 

 

It can be hard as fuck. And I'm gonna be honest here, having a good cardiovascular base makes it waaaay easier.

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26 minutes ago, Harriet said:


Oh wow. That sounds marvellously convenient, but I think I would fail a lot more of my lifts if I only waited for 90 seconds. 

 

8 minutes ago, Grumble said:

 

It can be hard as fuck. And I'm gonna be honest here, having a good cardiovascular base makes it waaaay easier.

 

Cardio makes it easier to lift things? Dammit. I am really running out of excuses for not doing cardio...! :( 

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4 hours ago, scalyfreak said:

 

Fair enough. I'm going by my own (limited) experience with OHP and how it seems to get heavier unless I do it before my other lifts.

 

It's a pretty standard model in that you don't want to train smaller, individual muscles that will assist in a compound lift after. They're already weak links and create imbalance after fatigue when applied to the larger lift = danger Will Robinson! While OHP is technically compound due to the amount of joints involved, in this case it doesn't engage comparable musculature to either bench or rows.

 

(This is also why OHP is such a small lift compared to the big boys and can plateau so much faster. Unless there's a performance goal attached to it for stuff like a snatch, or if someone just super loves that lift, I generally treat it as an accessory or part of BB complexes. Even in powerlifting I feel that focusing too much on developing OHP can stunt the big 3 in the long run.)

 

giphy.gif

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33 minutes ago, scalyfreak said:

 

 

Cardio makes it easier to lift things? Dammit. I am really running out of excuses for not doing cardio...! :( 

 

LOL right? Ain't it a bitch

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3 hours ago, Grumble said:

Clearly this is very important, but when you're prepping for a lift, does it make you a Jett-setter?

Pffft! I guess so!

 

It's also important that when I lift, I eat enough Jett fuel. :D

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23 minutes ago, Jett said:

 

It's also important that when I lift, I eat enough Jett fuel. :D

 

Yeah, you're going to fit in just fine :P 

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18 hours ago, Grumble said:

It can be hard as fuck. And I'm gonna be honest here, having a good cardiovascular base makes it waaaay easier.

<3 BB-style lifting. But I also loathe it. But mostly <3.

 

17 hours ago, RedStone said:

It's a pretty standard model in that you don't want to train smaller, individual muscles that will assist in a compound lift after. They're already weak links and create imbalance after fatigue when applied to the larger lift = danger Will Robinson! While OHP is technically compound due to the amount of joints involved, in this case it doesn't engage comparable musculature to either bench or rows.

 

(This is also why OHP is such a small lift compared to the big boys and can plateau so much faster. Unless there's a performance goal attached to it for stuff like a snatch, or if someone just super loves that lift, I generally treat it as an accessory or part of BB complexes. Even in powerlifting I feel that focusing too much on developing OHP can stunt the big 3 in the long run.)

 

giphy.gif

Sagestone dropping knowledge bombs again! Love the way you laid out your thinking framework for why to put OHP later.

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In preparation for starting the lifting program next week, I plan to go over all the lifts this weekend, to make sure I know how to do them. Putting it out here for accountability, because when weekends come, I have a tendency to drop everything and just sleep for 2 days.

 

4/18

7:30 AM: Wake up. Turn on sun lamp.

8:15 AM: exercise

9:00 AM: Breakfast, then leave for work.

1:00 PM: Lunch

6:30 PM: Head home (arrive ~7:15)

7:30 PM: Eat dinner

8:00 PM: Free time (TV, hobbies, art, gaming) - use blue light blocking glasses

9:45 PM: Take melatonin. Get ready for bed.

10:30 PM: Bed time.

 

Hydration: [================]D

Nutrition: O O O

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7 minutes ago, Jett said:

In preparation for starting the lifting program next week, I plan to go over all the lifts this weekend, to make sure I know how to do them. Putting it out here for accountability, because when weekends come, I have a tendency to drop everything and just sleep for 2 days.

 

4/18 (in progress)

7:30 AM: Wake up. Turn on sun lamp.

8:15 AM: exercise

9:00 AM: Breakfast, then leave for work.

1:00 PM: Lunch

6:30 PM: Head home (arrive ~7:15)

7:30 PM: Eat dinner

8:00 PM: Free time (TV, hobbies, art, gaming) - use blue light blocking glasses

9:45 PM: Take melatonin. Get ready for bed.

10:30 PM: Bed time.

 

Hydration: [================]D

Nutrition: 


Does red mean you did it? Or didn't do it? Does yellow mean you half did it? 

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If you don't sleep for 2 straight days, was it even a weekend? I told my coworker today that I'm already planning Saturday's nap. 

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37 minutes ago, Harriet said:

Does red mean you did it? Or didn't do it? Does yellow mean you half did it? 

Ah, sorry, the color explanations are in my last challenge.

 

The colors are based on timing. Green means I did the thing on schedule (currently with a 30 minute window, so if I get lunch at 1:29, it still counts as green).

Yellow means I did the thing within an hour of its scheduled time. Red means that I did the thing, but it was over an hour off (nearly always later rather than earlier).

Red with a line through it means the thing didn't happen.

 

I edit the day's schedule throughout the day, so if you go back and look at yesterday's post, you'll see that I had mostly greens in the afternoon, until bed time, when I got to sleep over an hour late. It's a handy visualization for me to see what parts of my schedule I'm having the most trouble with. Unsurprisingly, it's sleep schedule.

 

13 minutes ago, JessFit said:

If you don't sleep for 2 straight days, was it even a weekend? I told my coworker today that I'm already planning Saturday's nap. 

 

Weekend sleeping in is lovely, but it would be much better if I could just get enough sleep every night...

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1 minute ago, JessFit said:

If you don't sleep for 2 straight days, was it even a weekend? I told my coworker today that I'm already planning Saturday's nap. 

I'm lucky if I sleep for 2 straight hours on a weekend.

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4 hours ago, Grumble said:

I'm lucky if I sleep for 2 straight hours on a weekend.

 

Goodness, what disturbs your weekends?

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20 hours ago, Jett said:

Weekend sleeping in is lovely, but it would be much better if I could just get enough sleep every night...

Wait, get enough sleep every night? Thats a THING adults can do? I'm confused.

 

20 hours ago, Grumble said:

I'm lucky if I sleep for 2 straight hours on a weekend.

But, but why? I don't even know why, but HUG because sleep is the best. 

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Even though yesterday's schedule looks pretty, er, red... I'm very proud of myself for getting 100% on my hydration!

 

4/19

7:30 AM: Wake up. Turn on sun lamp.

8:15 AM: exercise

9:00 AM: Breakfast, then leave for work.

1:00 PM: Lunch

6:30 PM: Head home (arrive ~7:15)

7:30 PM: Eat dinner

8:00 PM: Free time (TV, hobbies, art, gaming) - use blue light blocking glasses

9:45 PM: Take melatonin. Get ready for bed.

10:30 PM: Bed time.

 

Hydration: [================]D

Nutrition: O O

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Yay for hydration! Did I miss the explainer on how to decode the hydration tracking? And getting most things done, even if not on the normal time.

 

Any idea what's getting in the way of exercising in the morning?

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4/22

7:30 AM: Wake up. Turn on sun lamp.

8:15 AM: 3x5 Day 1!!!

9:00 AM: Breakfast, then leave for work.

1:00 PM: Lunch

6:30 PM: Head home (arrive ~7:15)

7:30 PM: Eat dinner

8:00 PM: Free time (TV, hobbies, art, gaming) - use blue light blocking glasses

9:45 PM: Take melatonin. Get ready for bed.

10:30 PM: Bed time.

 

Hydration: [================]D

Nutrition: O O O

 

 

I did my first lifting workout! Kinda!

I have an over-the-door pull-up bar, but when I went to put it back together this weekend, I couldn't find one of the bolts. So I had to skip the pull-up portion of the workout. And talking with my wife, we decided that due to time concerns, we might need to shorten the workout, anyway. So I ended up dropping the accessories and just doing the big 3.

 

Here's what I actually did:

Barbell Back Squat 3×5
Barbell Bench Press 3×5 (this was supposed to be inclined, but my bench doesn't incline. :nightmare:)
Deadlift 3×5

 

Some notes:

It really did take me about 45 minutes to wake up. I hope to improve this in the future, but I need to keep that in mind for timing right now. It also took about 15-20 minutes to get ready for work after the lifting, and I didn't have time for breakfast. I need to start making my lunches the night before so I can reduce this time a little.

Even with the shortened workout, it still took about 45 minutes to do. This is because I only have one set of equipment, but my wife and I are trading off sets. I forgot to account for the time needed for two people to complete the workout. I'm also feeling a little under-equipped for this journey. At bare minimum, I think we need to buy another bar, so we can switch off on exercises (one could do bench press and the other deadlift, for example, and then swap). I was also not aware of the existence of inclining benches before now, but the bench I have kinda sucks. So maybe I need to upgrade...

 

I did all of the exercises with 10 lbs on the bar (which is a standard bar; I don't remember its exact weight, but I'm guessing 20 lbs). So... I ended up with jelly legs with just 30 lbs. :/ That feels really weak, but I guess we all start somewhere.

 

On 4/22/2019 at 9:36 AM, Mike Wazowski said:

Did I miss the explainer on how to decode the hydration tracking?

 

It represents my 1.5L water bottle on its side. So you can think of it like a progress bar showing roughly the % of 1.5L I drank that day. Blue is water consumed, grey is amount left to consume.

 

On 4/22/2019 at 9:36 AM, Mike Wazowski said:

Any idea what's getting in the way of exercising in the morning?

 

Time. When I don't sleep well (read: every night) I have trouble waking up, and by the time I get up there's no time for exercise.

But I did manage it this morning, and it felt really good. So here's hoping that the exercise will help with sleep, and create a positive feedback loop that leaves me better-rested and stronger.

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6 minutes ago, Jett said:

 

I did my first lifting workout! Kinda!

 

I did all of the exercises with 10 lbs on the bar (which is a standard bar; I don't remember its exact weight, but I'm guessing 20 lbs). So... I ended up with jelly legs with just 30 lbs. :/ That feels really weak, but I guess we all start somewhere.

 


Truly? This is your first lifting? AWESEOM! SO exciting I can't even spell it correctly!

Standard bars are 45lb, though you also see 35lb ones. I started with a 10lb dumbbell in each hand when I first began the bench and OHP, and with just the bar for the squat (after having done even lighter dumbbell squats at home for a few weeks). You will improve rapidly. It will be glorious.  

 

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28 minutes ago, Jett said:

Here's what I actually did:

Barbell Back Squat 3×5
Barbell Bench Press 3×5 (this was supposed to be inclined, but my bench doesn't incline. :nightmare:)
Deadlift 3×5

If you're just doing the major lifts (and the minor chords, but that's a real hallelujah when it happens) the flat bench is best bench.

 

28 minutes ago, Jett said:

Some notes:

Even with the shortened workout, it still took about 45 minutes to do. This is because I only have one set of equipment, but my wife and I are trading off sets. I forgot to account for the time needed for two people to complete the workout. I'm also feeling a little under-equipped for this journey. At bare minimum, I think we need to buy another bar, so we can switch off on exercises (one could do bench press and the other deadlift, for example, and then swap). I was also not aware of the existence of inclining benches before now, but the bench I have kinda sucks. So maybe I need to upgrade...

One bar is fine. And you can always reduce your rest times. (Don't @ me.)

Also, make sure you account for your total rest time while your workout partner is lifting. 

 

28 minutes ago, Jett said:

I did all of the exercises with 10 lbs on the bar (which is a standard bar; I don't remember its exact weight, but I'm guessing 20 lbs). So... I ended up with jelly legs with just 30 lbs. :/ That feels really weak, but I guess we all start somewhere.

Weigh it. Unless you specifically bought a trainer/junior bar (which is 15 lbs) you're either going to be using a "womens" bar at 35 lbs (bleh for stupid gendering of a goddamn barbell) or a standard barbell at 45 lbs. You are probably stronger than you think you are and you really want to have accurate measurements as you track your lifts.

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8 minutes ago, Grumble said:

If you're just doing the major lifts (and the minor chords, but that's a real hallelujah when it happens) the flat bench is best bench.

+1.

 

8 minutes ago, Grumble said:

One bar is fine. And you can always reduce your rest times. (Don't @ me.)

Also, make sure you account for your total rest time while your workout partner is lifting. 

+1 for shortening rest times (even if it feels like death the first time you do it) - although at some point you will have the logistics of changing weight on the bar in between sets, assuming you and your wife progress at different rates (I'm assuming this is likely to happen at some point unless she's also taking hormones).

 

8 minutes ago, Grumble said:

Weigh it. Unless you specifically bought a trainer/junior bar (which is 15 lbs) you're either going to be using a "womens" bar at 35 lbs (bleh for stupid gendering of a goddamn barbell) or a standard barbell at 45 lbs. You are probably stronger than you think you are and you really want to have accurate measurements as you track your lifts.

+1 for goddamn gendering of sports equipment - can we not just call it a lighter / narrower bar and move on with life?

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36 minutes ago, Harriet said:

Truly? This is your first lifting? AWESEOM! SO exciting I can't even spell it correctly!

 

Thank you! I did try to get into lifting some years ago... I think it was probably about 3-4 years ago now. That's why I have equipment already.

 

36 minutes ago, Harriet said:

Standard bars are 45lb, though you also see 35lb ones. I started with a 10lb dumbbell in each hand when I first began the bench and OHP, and with just the bar for the squat (after having done even lighter dumbbell squats at home for a few weeks). You will improve rapidly. It will be glorious.  

 

12 minutes ago, Grumble said:

Weigh it. Unless you specifically bought a trainer/junior bar (which is 15 lbs) you're either going to be using a "womens" bar at 35 lbs (bleh for stupid gendering of a goddamn barbell) or a standard barbell at 45 lbs. You are probably stronger than you think you are and you really want to have accurate measurements as you track your lifts.

 

Hmm. I know the "standard" Olympic bar is 10 feet long, 2 inches in diameter, and weighs 45 lbs. My bar is 1 inch in diameter, and I don't think it's 10 feet long. Probably more like 6. I have heard it called a "standard bar", which is confusing when the "standard Olympic" bar also has standard in the name! It does feel fairly heavy, but I'm not good at guessing the weight of things when I'm holding them. I will say, it feels lighter than a 30-lb bucket of cat litter. I'll do Grumble's suggestion and weigh it later.

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2 minutes ago, Mike Wazowski said:

+1 for shortening rest times (even if it feels like death the first time you do it) - although at some point you will have the logistics of changing weight on the bar in between sets, assuming you and your wife progress at different rates (I'm assuming this is likely to happen at some point unless she's also taking hormones).

 

This made me chuckle, because she is taking hormones, because she's also trans. But she's transitioning in the opposite direction! (There's been a lot of giving each other our old clothes... it's an interesting and often humorous experience. She asked me how to do makeup, and I was like "I don't know, I've always been shit at makeup and it makes me dysphoric!")

 

Anyway, yeah. I expect that we're going to diverge in weight amounts pretty quickly, and that's another big reason I want to get a second bar. We could each have our own barbell, loaded for our own needs, and not have to spend time constantly swapping plates around.

 

Today, my rest time between sets was the length of time it took my wife to do hers. So the only way to decrease rest times is to be doing the lifts simultaneously.

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