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Elastigirl

Elastigirl Has A Joy Filled Challenge

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This weekend was great.

Saturday hubby took a load of stuff from our garage to the hazardous waste, and then filled up our car with stuff to take to the Goodwill. He couldn't fit it all in, we still need to take another load. But our garage is looking better. While he did that , I cleaned house. We had a family from our church over for barbecue. I enjoy doing this, but it is definitely out of my comfort zone. I have talked to them a bit, but  I don't know them well.  I always worry beforehand that I will be awkward, or not know what to say. But, we had a good time. They have two boys and a little baby girl. Very sweet family, and we enjoyed each other, and got to know one another a bit better. We did marinated flank steak (pineapple juice, oil, soy sauce, ginger and onion spice) rice, and a heapload of veggies ( peppers, onions, asparagus, summer squash)  Then for dessert they brought ice cream.  Since I don't do dairy, I  bought my own dessert. I did coconut milk fudgesicles. They are good, and small, so they are only 150 calories. I like them because then it is just automatically portion controlled.

 

Then Sunday was Mother's Day. After church we went out for a quick lunch. I had steak kebabs, and a bit of rice. Then we went geocaching / hiking. It is a gorgeous area

Pic's are from the internet, because my computer wasn't cooperating. First picture is the lake, and the view of the hill. Second is the view from the trail

rattlesnake-lake-recreation.jpg

Rattlesnake-Ledge-lake-view.jpg

 

It was of course super crowded. But a gorgeous day.Sunny , but not hot. Our first three caches were a bust- we couldn't find them. My husband might have kept looking longer, but being Mother's Day , I get to call it when my attention span is gone.( I only like looking for so long, I refuse to keep looking in the same spot 20 times)  We did however find the next three. And the third one was  up the trail a bit further then where this picture was taken. Most people stop at this view.It was fun to go up further away from the crowds. and then have a ledge view to ourselves. My only regret is the last cache I just let my husband get. The spot looked a bit hard to get to, over this skinny ledge. And I talked myself out of trying. But , I wished I had. Just to push myself out of my comfort zone a bit. Of course, I say that now, but at the time I was really tired, so maybe I just didn't have the emotional oomph for it.

 

By the time we hiked back down we were hungry again. We decided to stop at Chipolte's. However, at the restaurant they had a sign saying they were out of forks. I didn't want to eat my food with a spoon, so we left. There was a sandwich shop that sold salads, so we went there. Reminded me again why I don't like restaurant salads. There was hardly any meat. I paid extra for avocado, and they gave me one slice. And they had that imitation bacon in it. Hard, grouse tasting  bites. So , I was still hungry . But we had some Lara bars from our hike, so I had that. 

 

Then we went to my son's place and played board games. Didn't get home until after 10 pm, so very full day. I had some leftover steak for a snack.

 

And I was going to post a wrap up of my week, but this has taken forever, and I don't remember all my goals. 

 

I did lose a half a pound this week. I wanted to lose a pound, but  my waist and belly are still decreasing, and I like how I look, so I'm content. I

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31 minutes ago, Elastigirl said:

And I was going to post a wrap up of my week, but this has taken forever, and I don't remember all my goals. 

 

I did lose a half a pound this week. I wanted to lose a pound, but  my waist and belly are still decreasing, and I like how I look, so I'm content.

I think that is a great wrap up!

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5 hours ago, Elastigirl said:

By the time we hiked back down we were hungry again. We decided to stop at Chipolte's. However, at the restaurant they had a sign saying they were out of forks. I didn't want to eat my food with a spoon, so we left. There was a sandwich shop that sold salads, so we went there. Reminded me again why I don't like restaurant salads. There was hardly any meat. I paid extra for avocado, and they gave me one slice. And they had that imitation bacon in it. Hard, grouse tasting  bites. So , I was still hungry . But we had some Lara bars from our hike, so I had that.

 

This sounds really frustrating, but it was oddly comforting to read. It's the kind of thing I convince myself only happens to me. 

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10 hours ago, Elastigirl said:

But, we had a good time.

That's good :)

 

The lake area looks beautiful. Glad you had such a good time.

10 hours ago, Elastigirl said:

But , I wished I had. Just to push myself out of my comfort zone a bit. Of course, I say that now, but at the time I was really tired, so maybe I just didn't have the emotional oomph for it.

Next time! You pushed your emotional comfort zone quite a bit already, with visitors, etc.

 

10 hours ago, Elastigirl said:

I did lose a half a pound this week. I wanted to lose a pound, but  my waist and belly are still decreasing, and I like how I look, so I'm content.

Woot! Woot! Way to go. :encouragement:

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17 hours ago, Xena said:

 

This sounds really frustrating, but it was oddly comforting to read. It's the kind of thing I convince myself only happens to me. 

It was sort of frustrating, but I have stuff like that happen often enough, I just roll with it now. I made my husband taste the bacon. I thought maybe I was being overly picky. He tasted it, made a face, and said it was that fake bacon that they used to serve in restaurants a long time ago.

12 hours ago, elizevdmerwe said:

That's good :)

 

The lake area looks beautiful. Glad you had such a good time.

Next time! You pushed your emotional comfort zone quite a bit already, with visitors, etc.

 

Woot! Woot! Way to go. :encouragement:

Thanks. Yay, some days are for pushing yourself a bit, and others are just for simple enjoyment.

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Week 3 wrap up

Goal 1

Eat slow- time my meals  at least 3 times

I am eating slow. At dinner, or with others, I try and finish my meal last. But nada on the timing. I forget, or don't want to bother. Sounded like a cool idea, but in reality, it hasn't happened

 

Goal 2

Lunch - No screen

Yes- Though to be honest I don't know if it makes much difference I my satiety level. I get more reading done. As for the reason I did it, to eat slower, I don't honestly notice much difference

 

Goal 3

Snacks no distractions

I have had a few snacks without a screen. And some with. I'm getting into the habit of having my post workout snack no screen. That seems like a good habit, as then I finish it and don't waste time on the computer. But sometimes in the evening I have a snack while reading the forums. I find myself not very motivated to work at this goal

 

Yesterday

 

Did my KB workout. Walked. Logged on MFP. We took my in-laws out to dinner, so that was a guestimate. I had salmon, and then subbed out the mashed potatoes for a veggie side, so I had two veggies. Came home and had some Halo Top (it's a diet ice cream) coconut milk ice cream. It was pretty good, but did have a bit of aftertaste of the sugar substitute they used

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Yesterday I made a big batch of Chicken thighs. Just  brushed a bit of Terriyaki sauce on them and baked them in the oven. We had baked potatoes for dinner, so I cooked up some extra potatoes and sweet potatoes.  Today I had friends over, then went for a walk with one of my friends. After she left, I had some of the chicken and sweet potato for lunch. Then did my workout.

 

Oh, backing up to yesterday. I decided to reduce my deficit by a bit. I was starting to feel at the end of my will power. Then I actually went over that. My son came over for dinner, and we had leftover ice cream, so I offered him some of that, and I had my frozen treat( it's the size of a tootsie roll,  sorbet covered in chocolate, 50 calories) which put me over. Then later I decided I was hungry ,and some chicken. So about 150 over,  just like a calorie deficit of 50 calories. Then, the funny thing was I weighed myself this morning, and I had dropped a pound.:smile-new: Scales can be weird. Anyway, today I am trying to eat a bit less and make up that deficit

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Since I whined about the changes to GMB, I thought I'd post an update. Today they sent out a email with more details, and I am once again a GMB fangirl:smile-new: Their new programs will still have skills (I thought it was going to all be like Elements). It just may not be the focused skills, such as a rings only program. As I understand it(they don't have specific details)  it will teach you how to use different apparatus and methods to achieve you goal, so that you could say combine ring training with paralette training. Which sounds super fun. They are also filming in 4k. Their next program will most likely be out in June.  

 

Today:

Did some crow practice, and some rowing, and then a walk. Followed MFP. Prayed before lunch, read a magazine while I ate. Dinner I ate slowly, stopping in between bites to enjoy conversation with my husband

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Catching up a bit-  your weekend sounded really great :)

 

The cheese, salami and peanut butter sandwich.. oh boy.. it's so great to have access to these memories! You sound like a great mom. You enjoyed the homeschooling? And did your son? Would you do it again? 

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@KB Girl

my children both did homeschooling/ cyberschooling.  especially my son whom homeschooled/cyberschooled from 5th grade to Now his Junior year.

 

yes, yes, and yes  (though in fairness it was my wife that did this)

my BIG sweeping observation is that homeschooling puts the parent back into the center of your child's education.  both kid and parent needs to be ready for the added responseabilities.

 

I suppose that might seem very obvious.   keep in mind Pennsylvania allows "cyberschool" education.  where a kid logs into the internet, talks to his teacher, and then does his assignments with assistance from the parent.

 

espacially when a Kid is young; there is a LOT hands-on work from the parents POV.   you will intimately get to know what your son/daughter is doing and be a partner with his/her teachers.

...

 

outside of this specific type of education.  I would say that "homeschooling" is general and could mean a lot of things.  

 

I know a parent, for example.  that actually Taught their kids entire education.   no enrollment in any school- they paid for all the books,etc.   at 18  they had their kid take the GRE.   I think they were able to do this because they moved in from another state they didn't register their kid in the local school district and somehow the school system was never aware of that.   technically, If I understand the law correctly they broke state law.

 

Anyways, that would be a massive commitment and very hard to do- whether it was legal or not.  I IMHO think they took unacceptable risks to do this... my understanding "keeping" a kid away from school is grounds for having your kids removed from the home.

 

...

anyways.  whatever you mean by home schooling- I just think its important to stress the big time commitment you will put into your kid's education and to be aware of the need for big commitment from the kid's POV too.

 

if they are NOT convinced I think it would be a disaster.

 

my son has a disability and was picked on by other kids he was eager and happy to get out of public school.

---

ha.

I know you didn't ask me.  we've not talked much.  but I thought I would point out my experiences.

 

 

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4 hours ago, KB Girl said:

Catching up a bit-  your weekend sounded really great :)

 

The cheese, salami and peanut butter sandwich.. oh boy.. it's so great to have access to these memories! You sound like a great mom. You enjoyed the homeschooling? And did your son? Would you do it again? 

Thanks. Yes, I loved homeschooling, and my son did too (for the most part- nothing is always easy) One of the things I enjoyed the most was the ability to follow my son's interests, and go at his own pace. He was very advanced mathematically, read novels at 4 years old, but struggled with writing.

 

When I started, I just thought I'd try it for a year and see how it went

1 hour ago, TGP said:

@KB Girl

my children both did homeschooling/ cyberschooling.  especially my son whom homeschooled/cyberschooled from 5th grade to Now his Junior year.

 

yes, yes, and yes  (though in fairness it was my wife that did this)

my BIG sweeping observation is that homeschooling puts the parent back into the center of your child's education.  both kid and parent needs to be ready for the added responseabilities.

 

I suppose that might seem very obvious.   keep in mind Pennsylvania allows "cyberschool" education.  where a kid logs into the internet, talks to his teacher, and then does his assignments with assistance from the parent.

 

espacially when a Kid is young; there is a LOT hands-on work from the parents POV.   you will intimately get to know what your son/daughter is doing and be a partner with his/her teachers.

...

 

outside of this specific type of education.  I would say that "homeschooling" is general and could mean a lot of things.  

 

I know a parent, for example.  that actually Taught their kids entire education.   no enrollment in any school- they paid for all the books,etc.   at 18  they had their kid take the GRE.   I think they were able to do this because they moved in from another state they didn't register their kid in the local school district and somehow the school system was never aware of that.   technically, If I understand the law correctly they broke state law.

 

Anyways, that would be a massive commitment and very hard to do- whether it was legal or not.  I IMHO think they took unacceptable risks to do this... my understanding "keeping" a kid away from school is grounds for having your kids removed from the home.

 

...

anyways.  whatever you mean by home schooling- I just think its important to stress the big time commitment you will put into your kid's education and to be aware of the need for big commitment from the kid's POV too.

 

if they are NOT convinced I think it would be a disaster.

 

my son has a disability and was picked on by other kids he was eager and happy to get out of public school.

---

ha.

I know you didn't ask me.  we've not talked much.  but I thought I would point out my experiences.

 

 

Yep, it is a big time commitment. In our state, we don't have to enroll in a school.We paid for all our books (and there were a lot!) We had to sign a form called a Declaration of Intent  with the school district each year, and were legally required to do some form of testing. But we didn't have to report to the school. I taught my son on his own  K- High School. In High School, he took some classes at our community college( high schooler can do that for free) In HIgh School, I kept more records of his schooling, and  made sure he had all the classes that are required for high school graduation in our state. He also took The SAT (tests that colleges look at for acceptance) 

 

We do have options here where you can homeschool, but you use the same curriculum as your school district, and you can cyber school. I have friends who did that. For me, I liked the freedom of designing something that worked best for my son's needs

 

I'm not sure what you mean  by the fact that keeping your kids from school is grounds for having your kids removed? Most states in America allow homeschooling. Some states are stricter about the requirement than others, as well as the enforcement. That said, our laws here are pretty lax, and yet I know of parents who didn't follow them and I always wondered why they didn't .

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all I mean is that I think keeping your kids home illegally could get you investigated by social services and that agency can take kids away from parents they believe are not treating them right.

I know little about the state law's about education.    really nothing about what might happen if you don't follow the law.

 

this is a solid advantage of picking cyber-schooling.  You do not have to worry about knowing the legalities involved.  there's a school district to help you deal with the state regulations.

 

OTOH; cyber schooling is not as "hands off" as they would have you believe when you first look into it.

I feel that , my wife really has mostly homeschooled my kids.  they were long 10-12hour days for school season after school season.

 

idk. maybe I should not have chimed in here. (since it is something different to "homeschool" a child")

 

I am very impressed that you went the additional mile to homeschool your children.  also in regards to the person we know that home-schooled their child.

he is now in college.  he is a fantastic student and who is doing very good in a large university. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, TGP said:

all I mean is that I think keeping your kids home illegally could get you investigated by social services and that agency can take kids away from parents they believe are not treating them right.

I know little about the state law's about education.    really nothing about what might happen if you don't follow the law.

 

this is a solid advantage of picking cyber-schooling.  You do not have to worry about knowing the legalities involved.  there's a school district to help you deal with the state regulations.

 

OTOH; cyber schooling is not as "hands off" as they would have you believe when you first look into it.

I feel that , my wife really has mostly homeschooled my kids.  they were long 10-12hour days for school season after school season.

 

idk. maybe I should not have chimed in here. (since it is something different to "homeschool" a child")

 

I am very impressed that you went the additional mile to homeschool your children.  also in regards to the person we know that home-schooled their child.

he is now in college.  he is a fantastic student and who is doing very good in a large university. 

 

 

Thanks for  chiming in. It is good to hear other people's experiences.  KBGirl is in Netherland (or Norway?) so I have no idea what those laws are.  It is nice that we have many different way to homeschool our  children. Our laws were pretty easy to comply with, so that was never really a concern for me. Thanks for the explanation of what you were saying. I thought that was what you meant. I know some people who didn't comply with the law, but I never figured it was worth the risk.

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Laws in the Netherlands are quite complex, but it's easy to legally homeschool as long as your child has never been enrolled in a school. And then there are no checkups or requirements, just complete freedom.

 

On 5/17/2019 at 9:18 PM, Elastigirl said:

When I started, I just thought I'd try it for a year and see how it went

You're the second person to say this and really it has been the best advice- very calming. See how it goes. 

 

On 5/17/2019 at 9:18 PM, Elastigirl said:

One of the things I enjoyed the most was the ability to follow my son's interests, and go at his own pace.

Brilliant :) Emma is still young, but I'm sure I'll be asking you questions next year. Reading novels at 4? that's... amazing! How did he learn to read? 

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12 minutes ago, KB Girl said:

Laws in the Netherlands are quite complex, but it's easy to legally homeschool as long as your child has never been enrolled in a school. And then there are no checkups or requirements, just complete freedom.

 

You're the second person to say this and really it has been the best advice- very calming. See how it goes. 

 

Brilliant :) Emma is still young, but I'm sure I'll be asking you questions next year. Reading novels at 4? that's... amazing! How did he learn to read? 

I will be happy to answer questions.

Reading, well honestly he taught himself. But here's the story:

When he was 4 he kept saying he wanted to learn to read. But, I resisted because I didn't want to be a pushy mom. My friend, who is a teacher, said he was already doing beginning reading. He could "read" books that he memorized and he recognized roadway restaurant signs (like McDonalds) So I decided to teach him. Bought a book called "Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Lessons'  Which is phonics based. Bought some beginning phonic books. We did that for a little bit, a couple of weeks. He read the phonics book out loud, so I knew he could read them. He read other books to himself too, but I assumed he was just sort of looking at the pictures. One day, I had a friend over. . At nighttime we had been reading The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe.(chapter book) While my friend was visiting , my son asked me to read to him, and I told him he would have to wait until my friend left. He said he would just read it himself. I nodded, thinking, yeah right. Then I noticed that he was  very quietly reading the book aloud to himself. I listened, and sure enough he was reading it. We did a few more of the lessons, and then he declared picture books were for babies, and would only read chapter books

 

One of the things I  threw away was a giant bookworm . Someone told me early readers don't really understand the books they read, and I was worried about it. So, I had him give me a short oral book report on each book he read. Then I wrote the book on a bit of construction paper circle, and made a bookworm, that I put on our kitchen wall. 

 

Kids really do learn to read at their own speed though. Some kids wait until later to read, but  then they are still good readers. I think for my son, it was a pattern to figure out. To him, reading was a mystery to solve. He is a computer programmer now. I think that's the same part of the brain. He loves to figure out the coding, and see where something works, or where the pattern breaks down

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Thank you so much for the story! that's very encouraging :)

Reading really is a pattern.. I wonder if the focus on learning individual letters (or numbers) is really the wrong idea, because then they're not part of a pattern to recognise. 

You'd recommend the book? I'll make a note of it. 

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2 hours ago, KB Girl said:

Thank you so much for the story! that's very encouraging :)

Reading really is a pattern.. I wonder if the focus on learning individual letters (or numbers) is really the wrong idea, because then they're not part of a pattern to recognise. 

You'd recommend the book? I'll make a note of it. 

It was a good book. Not sure if they still sell it:smile-new: It was set p to sit and go over the lesson with your child daily, it took about 15 minutes, very laid back, easy approach

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Weekend happenings;

I want to boast about something  you don't usually here people boasting about: the only veggie  I had with my Saturday dinner was 1 piece of lettuce and a slice of onion. Let me explain. I  have a really good habit of eating veggies with most meals. Which is great. But then the problem of perfectionism sneaks in, and I tell myself I'm failing when I don't live up to that standard. So Saturday we were busy all day (more on that later) and then had my son over for an impromptu dinner, before we went and saw a movie. I hadn't planned anything, and my first thought was how I needed to make a salad, and blah and blah, a list of things I needed to do. But I was tired. I didn't want to go out to eat, but thought maybe I should since I couldn't make all the requirements for a meal. Then I thought about it,  and realized we had some frozen sweet potato fries that I could cook. Had hubby go to the store and buy the hamburger that is already made into patties, and some buns. And we had hamburger and fries. A nice, easy meal. Filling, and we all enjoyed it. I remember  @annyshay once saying how she had made the mistake of thinking if it wasn't hard to make, then it must not be a good food choice (or something like that:friendly_wink:) Anyway, when she said that, it hit me how often I do that to myself. So,  I have at times purposely taken the pressure off myself and realized not every meal has to be 100% healthy.

 

Saturday was fun. We hosted game day for our church. We played my favorite cooperative game, Hogwarts, with a couple of teens who are super sweet. Sadly, we lost. And then they taught us how to play Istanbul. And my son taught a little boy (7 yrs old) how to play Dominion, and he let the little boy win, and the boy was so excited! Fun to see my adult son interacting so sweetly with this little boy. We had bought potato chips, but I stayed away from them. We bought one kind that had cheese (so I can't eat them) and another kind that I am meh about. We stopped by the market before and bought some really good roasted chicken and salad, so I still felt like I had  fun special food. Then we went home, I went for a short walk, then had dinner. Then we went and saw Tolkien. I really liked the movie. It hasn't gotten good reviews, but I thought  it was good. Not great, but solid. And I liked seeing it with my son, who is a big Tolkien nerd

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On 5/17/2019 at 7:48 PM, TGP said:

keep in mind Pennsylvania allows "cyberschool" education.

They have one of the best online educational programmes, set up by a previous home school mom, called Easy Peasy, or All in one homeschool, officially.

 

15 hours ago, Elastigirl said:

It was a good book. Not sure if they still sell it:smile-new: It was set p to sit and go over the lesson with your child daily, it took about 15 minutes, very laid back, easy approach

It is still sold here and there, I think I saw it on Amazon last year, and definitely available 2nd hand.

 

18 hours ago, KB Girl said:

Reading really is a pattern.. I wonder if the focus on learning individual letters (or numbers) is really the wrong idea, because then they're not part of a pattern to recognise.

It really depends on the child's way of learning. My oldest for instance couldn't make head or tails of individual letters, with or without pictures. But when I started him on words, and broke it down from there to letters, he got it immediately. After I was sure that he had learned the alphabet through various words, we went through phonics and the individual letters again and it was much easier. Have a look at Easy Peasy (link above), at the Learn to Read section.

Both my boys are late readers though. Oldest only started reading around 10yrs (he is now 12 and reading almost fluently in both Afrikaans and English), and my youngest is 10 and also only getting along more fluently now.

 

Why I love HS also is what @Elastigirl mentioned w.r.t. her son: you can help them along at their individual pace. We started for other reasons, but ended up loving it, and can't imagine our lives any other way.

12 hours ago, Elastigirl said:

the only veggie  I had with my Saturday dinner was 1 piece of lettuce and a slice of onion.

:D Good for you!

 

Glad you had a good time at the movies with your son.

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11 hours ago, elizevdmerwe said:

It really depends on the child's way of learning. My oldest for instance couldn't make head or tails of individual letters, with or without pictures. But when I started him on words, and broke it down from there to letters, he got it immediately. After I was sure that he had learned the alphabet through various words, we went through phonics and the individual letters again and it was much easier. Have a look at Easy Peasy (link above), at the Learn to Read section.

Both my boys are late readers though. Oldest only started reading around 10yrs (he is now 12 and reading almost fluently in both Afrikaans and English), and my youngest is 10 and also only getting along more fluently now.

 

I think you are right on. I have friends who had kids who were later readers, and once they started reading, they caught up almost immediately.

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Challenge wrap up

 

so my goals were

 

1) Track how slow I was eating- time myself 3 times a week- well if the goal had been 3 times in the challenge, I would have conquered it. But , it wasn't . This one flopped. And I decided I didn't care. I did however, continue to  get into the habit of eating slow and thoughtfully.

 

2) Eat snacks with no distractions- about 50% - 

 

3) Eat lunch with no screen 4 x a week _Yay! This one I managed all 4 weeks. Honestly, I didn't really tell a difference in my satiety, so I don't know if I will keep it up.

 

I also did a good job of tracking with MFP.

Overall: I did lose 3 pounds , and about an inch an my belly, so that was a win! My theme was joy. I wanted to lose weight, but not make myself miserable in the process. I think I found a good balance, so another win !

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