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What are the symptoms of overtraining on isolation exercises?

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Hi there. I am following 5*5 barbell workout and I am thinking about incorporating some isolation exercises for abs and rear delts for aesthetics. I will do band pull apart with a resistance band and work my abs from different angles with resistance bands. But I don't know how should I incorporate these exercises into my program. Everyone has different recovery time and I want to adjust sets with symptoms of overtraining. Symptoms of overtraining from compound exercises are easy to determine but what about isolation exercises?

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As in all things, it depends on your personal physiology, and how well you're practicing your recovery strategies. Also depends on how you're toggling the intensity/frequency/volume - each of those will affect your ability to recover, regardless of which muscles you're hitting. Keep a log and figure out what works for you!

 

For what it's worth, the concept of 'overtraining' certain muscle groups is a bit...bro-sciency. I'm not sure what 'symptoms' you're referring to for compound exercises that would indicate 'overtraining' - but that terms is meant to describe something approaching a medical condition, and it definitely doesn't happen overnight, or over a couple of weeks. If you stop making progress with your lifts, feel tired all the time, feel gassed after workouts, etc - that's when you should double check your sleep quality/quantity, adjust how much you're working out (again: intensity/frequency/volume), make sure you're eating enough kcal and protein, etc. But for specific muscle groups? There aren't really any clear cut signs, apart from shitty workouts.

 

If you're asking if you can under-recover, the answer is 'of course'. If you want to know the optimal volume/frequency training choices for different muscle groups - well, so would the rest of us. ;) There is so much variation between individuals that affects ideal training strategies, there will never be one answer.

 

TL:DR - no such thing, track your workouts and figure out the sweet spot for your body

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it's usually tendons and ligaments that  get overused. They get stronger slower than muscles. If you feel sharp pain when you are working out, that is a sign to stop. If  you feel pain in your tendon , or joints, that  is a sign that you might be overtraining.  For the most part, abs  are pretty hard to overtrain. If the band pull aparts start giving you pain in the shoulder joint, than yo need to give your body a bit more rest.

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I'd say Coca cola pee; and it's highly unlikely.

 

I would go ahead and go crazy on those band pull-aparts--many of us don't do nearly enough of those, and the upper back usually responds well to high volume. And you can totally blast your abs with hollow variations and side planks. You're not really stressing a lot of joints with those. (I wouldn't do them with sit-ups though.)

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The sign of overtraining is a lack of improved performance, despite an increase in training intensity or volume. Decreased agility, strength and endurance, such as slower reaction times and reduced running speeds are all common signs of overtraining.

 

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