• Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Recommended Posts

Dang, you guys have been geeking out about Enneagram AND birthing centers and I missed it?? Talk about FOMO!!  :P  

 

I'm so glad everything is progressing as expected - baby, parents and house! Your updates make me smile (on the infrequent occasions that I actually read them)!  :D 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

In the US hospitals used to be all all non-profit. Then in '73 Nixon signed the Health Management Organization act that allowed hospitals to operate as for-profit businesses. It's been all downhill ever since.

 

I think it's more than I knew you all had to pay for the births of your children but I'd never really thought about it properly. When I think about whether I am prepared for the financial costs that come along with having children I am thinking more along the lines off am I ready to take the drop in my wages for the last 6 months of my 12 months maternity leave, not can I afford to actually give birth. Is this something people have to factor in? And what happens if you sort your payments for the birth and then extra care is needed - are you charged extra?

 

Sorry if these are dumb questions :)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's so interesting how different things are around the world.. and sometimes a little sad. For profit hospitals just seems like a horribly bad idea. In the Netherlands, if you give birth in a hospital then you're good to go home after a couple hours. When you give birth at home (about 25-30% of women do) then you'll have your midwife with you and a special 'welcoming baby' service that checks your sleeping arrangement to make sure it's save for baby. And they clean up any mess. (maybe that's why we don't have birth centers)
The baby welcoming service also comes if you come from the hospital, to double check you're all alright. And then in both situations there'll be the "kraamzorg" for 8 days that comes to take care of mom+baby. (and they do your laundry and vacuum too) 

 

With my first I planned to give birth at home but after 40+ hours labor stalled (was stuck at 9,5cm dilation for a couple hours) so my midwife thought it was best to go to the hospital.. something in the car must have changed baby's position because I gave birth as soon as we arrived at the hospital xD 

But she was born at 01:00 and we were home by 05:00. 

 

What will happen for you cost-wise if you have to move from the birth center to the hospital? 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, SkyGirl said:

Dang, you guys have been geeking out about Enneagram AND birthing centers and I missed it?? Talk about FOMO!!  :P  

 

I'm so glad everything is progressing as expected - baby, parents and house! Your updates make me smile (on the infrequent occasions that I actually read them)!  :D 

I'm glad you are enjoying reading them.

4 hours ago, deftona said:

 

I think it's more than I knew you all had to pay for the births of your children but I'd never really thought about it properly. When I think about whether I am prepared for the financial costs that come along with having children I am thinking more along the lines off am I ready to take the drop in my wages for the last 6 months of my 12 months maternity leave, not can I afford to actually give birth. Is this something people have to factor in? And what happens if you sort your payments for the birth and then extra care is needed - are you charged extra?

 

Sorry if these are dumb questions :)

They are not dumb questions. Most people don't factor in the cost of giving birth. If they have insurance, they just pay co-pays and co-insurance payments as they come in. The problems with US healthcare are multifaceted, and therefore any "Solution" must be equally piecemeal. Part of what is so screwed up is the way medical billing works. Because the doctors are all inddependent contractors, they each bill at their own times, and the hospitals bill at their own times (sometimes multiple parts of the hospital submit their paperwork and different times). To further complicate things, there is the "price" the hospital charges, then the "negotiated fee" insurance companies talk them down to, then how much of that fee insurance will pay, and whether or not you have met your deductible. You can get bills for one hospital stay for months as different parts get billed. Then the insurance companies take forever to process their side of the paperwork. To make matters worse, you get paperwork from the insurance company that is NOT A BILL that shows what they think you owe, then you get a bill from the providers for what they say you owe. Sometimes you have to fight with everyone cause someone in a cube made a mistake. 

Now, hospitals are not allowed to refuse medical treatment (EMTALA laws), so they have to write off a lot of what they do as bad debt, which raises the costs for those who can actually pay or have insurance, and now you have another piece of the puzzle. Non-profit hospitals gave away "charity care" and still do, but the for-profit hospitals don't take it so well. Thus you have prices going up for the people who do pay to cover the cost of those who do not. Furthermore, as medical science has advanced, there is a lot more that can be done at hospitals than there used to be, most of which involves expensive meds and expensive equipment. We can keep people alive (or at least not dead yet) a lot longer than we used to, which also drives up costs, as family members in crisis often want "Everything done." Hospitals cannot refuse this, but often all that extra ICU care makes costs skyrocket.

Now as to your second question, if something goes wrong, we'll have to pay hospital bills. The birth center is it's own thing, and we knew going in that if we have to go to the hospital that's a seperate cost. If you have to go straight to the hospital without spending time there at all they give you some of your money back, but some of the cost goes to the pre-natal care they provide.

3 hours ago, KB Girl said:

It's so interesting how different things are around the world.. and sometimes a little sad. For profit hospitals just seems like a horribly bad idea. In the Netherlands, if you give birth in a hospital then you're good to go home after a couple hours. When you give birth at home (about 25-30% of women do) then you'll have your midwife with you and a special 'welcoming baby' service that checks your sleeping arrangement to make sure it's save for baby. And they clean up any mess. (maybe that's why we don't have birth centers)
The baby welcoming service also comes if you come from the hospital, to double check you're all alright. And then in both situations there'll be the "kraamzorg" for 8 days that comes to take care of mom+baby. (and they do your laundry and vacuum too) 

 

With my first I planned to give birth at home but after 40+ hours labor stalled (was stuck at 9,5cm dilation for a couple hours) so my midwife thought it was best to go to the hospital.. something in the car must have changed baby's position because I gave birth as soon as we arrived at the hospital xD 

But she was born at 01:00 and we were home by 05:00. 

 

What will happen for you cost-wise if you have to move from the birth center to the hospital? 

 

See my response to Deffy for the answer to your question about paying.

 

For profit hospitals are awful. I'm in a unique situation; my hospital system is half owned by the charity group that started the first hospital, and half owned by a for-profit corporation. I like to say that the charity side keeps the system human and the for-profit side keeps the doors open. It's still an uneasy tension at times. Many non-profit hospitals had to sell out to for-profit corporations because as health care costs started to rise they couldn't keep up with either the rising costs or all the charity care they were giving away, the two combined were a death-knell. 

 

Now as to why we put up with this situation, the answer is as multifaceted as the problem. One, this all developed over time, no one reason is the cause, it's the confluence of a lot of independent variables. Two, each state has its own regulations, and the insurance companies are often national. Three, for-profit insurance companies have a lot of money, and use it to pay lobbyists to convince lawmakers to keep the system as is.

 

What about fixing it? For one, if you nationalize health care, you will put lots of people out of work as the government takes over what was once the purview of private companies. For another, most of us see how poorly the government runs anything, so we are skeptical it would manage healthcare any better than anything else it does. Opponents of nationalized health care point to extended wait times and all the negatives of European or Canadian style systems without every looking at the positives. Proponents of such focus only on the positives of European or Canadian style systems without ever looking at the negatives. Government takeover of private industry also seems like communism, and the memory of the Red Scare is still very much alive in this country. Those who can't afford health care see government solutions as all benefit; I get my health care where I didn't have any before. Others see the increased tax burden required to pay for such a solution. For my part, those of us who work are paying for medical care one way or another, whether through higher costs and insurance premiums, or through taxes. Sadly, for many, they see only their own situation without considering how change, or the lack thereof, affects any but them. 

 

For myself, I see the question as which set of problems one prefers.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

For myself, I see the question as which set of problems one prefers.


Super interesting topic. I had private health insurance in Australia (when I was still under 18) and have public health insurance in Germany. I'm pretty amazed by the German system. People pay more or less for their public insurance based on how much they earn, I think. And the quality of care is good--in fact, I trust German doctors because they tend to be no-nonsense and they're not motivated to do unnecessary, expensive procedures. I don't wait any longer than I did when I saw a private doctor in Australia. I'm not sure what the downsides are, to be honest. But then, I don't see higher taxes as a problem if they're used for good stuff that benefits everyone. I'm happy to pay something back to a nation that's enabled my education, security, health, and has offered numerous other benefits, especially if it helps those who aren't able to pay due to individual circumstances or structural injustices. Enjoying the benefits without paying anything back is like picking crops then refusing to fertilise or take care of the soil. 

Anyway, I'm glad you have a birth centre and midwife. It sounds like the perfect combination of comfort and safety. 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, KB Girl said:

For profit hospitals just seems like a horribly bad idea. In the Netherlands, if you give birth in a hospital then you're good to go home after a couple hours. When you give birth at home (about 25-30% of women do) then you'll have your midwife with you and a special 'welcoming baby' service that checks your sleeping arrangement to make sure it's

American hospitals usually have you stay overnight . I like the idea of sending you home in a few hours. If there are no complications, I don't see any reason for making it an overnight visit. Also, there is a trend to make the birth centers super fancy. Which seems like a nice idea, but  someone has to pay the bill for that.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
 
8
 Advanced issues found
 
 
1
15 hours ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

 

 

9 six and 1 are all related. When sixes are healthy they take on the healthy aspects of a 9. When 9s are unhealthy they take on the unhealthy aspects of a 6. 9s can have a one wing (I do). They are not polar opposites. In fact, Sra. Tanque is a 1 with a 9 wing. 

 

 

 

 

 

Ohhhh now I remember. I did some reading up on it and can't decide if I am a 6 who has gone healthy 9 or a 9 who has gone unhealthy 6. :confused:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Elastigirl said:

American hospitals usually have you stay overnight . I like the idea of sending you home in a few hours. If there are no complications, I don't see any reason for making it an overnight visit. Also, there is a trend to make the birth centers super fancy. Which seems like a nice idea, but  someone has to pay the bill for that.

 

When I had my girls, I had some blood loss issues but was released within 24 hours of their birth. They, however, needed NICU so they were transported to another hospital. I have really good insurance, so they didn't have to fly them out, they got to stay at one of the local NICUs. After a couple of days, Hubs and I were convinced we should be going home but for whatever reason (*cough*money*cough*) the NICU refused to release them and kept saying oh this issue that issue. It wasn't until near 2 weeks later when my personal nurse through my insurance called me to check on me that my insurance was like hey wait and started harassing the hospital for the medical back up as to why they were keeping my girls there that we were released. Not even joking, my insurance called and within a day and a half, both girls were released. Amazing. 

  • Like 2
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Harriet said:


Super interesting topic. I had private health insurance in Australia (when I was still under 18) and have public health insurance in Germany. I'm pretty amazed by the German system. People pay more or less for their public insurance based on how much they earn, I think. And the quality of care is good--in fact, I trust German doctors because they tend to be no-nonsense and they're not motivated to do unnecessary, expensive procedures. I don't wait any longer than I did when I saw a private doctor in Australia. I'm not sure what the downsides are, to be honest. But then, I don't see higher taxes as a problem if they're used for good stuff that benefits everyone. I'm happy to pay something back to a nation that's enabled my education, security, health, and has offered numerous other benefits, especially if it helps those who aren't able to pay due to individual circumstances or structural injustices. Enjoying the benefits without paying anything back is like picking crops then refusing to fertilise or take care of the soil. 

Anyway, I'm glad you have a birth centre and midwife. It sounds like the perfect combination of comfort and safety. 

Thanks, we are happy with where we are at.

54 minutes ago, Elastigirl said:

American hospitals usually have you stay overnight . I like the idea of sending you home in a few hours. If there are no complications, I don't see any reason for making it an overnight visit. Also, there is a trend to make the birth centers super fancy. Which seems like a nice idea, but  someone has to pay the bill for that.

Hospitals are not above competing for that sweet, sweet baby money. One hospital in town which I consider sub-standard has as it's one shining jewel it's Mother-Baby program, complete with in bed post partum massages.

39 minutes ago, tishnicden said:

 

When I had my girls, I had some blood loss issues but was released within 24 hours of their birth. They, however, needed NICU so they were transported to another hospital. I have really good insurance, so they didn't have to fly them out, they got to stay at one of the local NICUs. After a couple of days, Hubs and I were convinced we should be going home but for whatever reason (*cough*money*cough*) the NICU refused to release them and kept saying oh this issue that issue. It wasn't until near 2 weeks later when my personal nurse through my insurance called me to check on me that my insurance was like hey wait and started harassing the hospital for the medical back up as to why they were keeping my girls there that we were released. Not even joking, my insurance called and within a day and a half, both girls were released. Amazing. 

I'm 0% surprised at that. Some hospitals are so shady no grass will grow around them.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today is a good day. Went to work, then went to a birth class. Due to scheduling, we are taking them out of order, but that's not a problem. Tonight was about what happens if a transfer to a hospital is necessary. The big piece is that if you go to a birthing center, they only transfer you to a hospital if it's actually needed. The idea is hospitals don't know what to do with normal births so they lean towards interventions more appropriate in difficult births.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for elaborating on the topic, very very interesting. I'd read that C-section rates are so much higher in the states partly because of either money or the doctors on shift simply wanting to get it over with and go home. I'd dismissed both as fear mongering- but now I'm not so sure. 

4 hours ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

The idea is hospitals don't know what to do with normal births so they lean towards interventions more appropriate in difficult births.

That probably has something to do with that higher C-section rate also then. 

 

Did they also explain when it is necessary? 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:
19 hours ago, Elastigirl said:

American hospitals usually have you stay overnight . I like the idea of sending you home in a few hours. If there are no complications, I don't see any reason for making it an overnight visit. Also, there is a trend to make the birth centers super fancy. Which seems like a nice idea, but  someone has to pay the bill for that.

Hospitals are not above competing for that sweet, sweet baby money. One hospital in town which I consider sub-standard has as it's one shining jewel it's Mother-Baby program, complete with in bed post partum massages.

 

Busting my way into the conversation. In the US, there is a huge disparity in hospital reimbursement for Commercial payers versus Medicaid. Hospitals have a financial need to encourage those with better insurance to have their babies in those hospitals. While Commercial reimbursement for deliveries is high, hospitals need to make sure it offsets Medicaid deliveries (because this can significantly impact how profitable L&D is).

 

There have been shifts in Maternal Fetal Medicine over the past number of years, including a number of different programs aimed at better maternity care and lowered rates of C-Sections. Geisinger (PA system with it's own insurance plan) had a program where reimbursement rates were incentivized if women had vaginal deliveries to term babies (both reducing the number of C-Sections and the number of early births). The company I work for also recently released a campaign to help raise the quality of MFM for our member hospitals (toot toot my own horn).

 

5 hours ago, KB Girl said:
9 hours ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

The idea is hospitals don't know what to do with normal births so they lean towards interventions more appropriate in difficult births.

That probably has something to do with that higher C-section rate also then. 

 

Did they also explain when it is necessary? 

 

There are some really interesting theories as to why the C-Section rates are higher in the US. One is technology. With the monitoring that occurs during maternity care (both in the office and in the hospital), clinicians are more in tune with changes in "normal" for mother and baby. So they are more proactive with treatment. Also, the rates of litigation in the US are higher than a lot of other countries. So C-sections are considered "defensive medicine" - i.e. there wasn't anything more that could be done. Finally, reports have shown that there is a niche of truly elective C-sections (where the women request to have one) - it's <10% of all C-sections, but that could be enough to skew rates, depending on how frequent they are. 

 

From a physician standpoint, the disparity between provider billing reimbursement for Vaginal vs. C-Section is much more negligible than the hospital billing reimbursement. So, unless physicians are employed by the hospital, there isn't as much of a financial incentive as it sometimes seems. But, I'm also very much pro-hospital and pro-physician. So you can take my statements with a grain of salt.

 

If you'd like me to discuss the state of health insurance in the US, I'd be happy to. I'm very opinionated.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sylvaa said:

If you'd like me to discuss the state of health insurance in the US, I'd be happy to. I'm very opinionated.

 

I feel like this could start a war.  Everyone has their thoughts & feelings about healthcare, and it’s issues/shortcomings.

 

 

I recently learned to stay away from stand alone Emergency Rooms.   They coded my son at the highest level, a 5, which is what they code heart attacks and other life threatening events.  He needed an inhaler.  Had to fight to get it reduced.  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, KB Girl said:

Thanks for elaborating on the topic, very very interesting. I'd read that C-section rates are so much higher in the states partly because of either money or the doctors on shift simply wanting to get it over with and go home. I'd dismissed both as fear mongering- but now I'm not so sure. 

That probably has something to do with that higher C-section rate also then. 

 

Did they also explain when it is necessary? 

The Birth center did, yes. It's hard to generalize across all providers. Different ones have different motivations. One lady in our class said her Dr. told her if she didn't deliver by her due date she was going to be either induced or have a c-section. 

1 hour ago, Sylvaa said:

 

Busting my way into the conversation. In the US, there is a huge disparity in hospital reimbursement for Commercial payers versus Medicaid. Hospitals have a financial need to encourage those with better insurance to have their babies in those hospitals. While Commercial reimbursement for deliveries is high, hospitals need to make sure it offsets Medicaid deliveries (because this can significantly impact how profitable L&D is).

 

There have been shifts in Maternal Fetal Medicine over the past number of years, including a number of different programs aimed at better maternity care and lowered rates of C-Sections. Geisinger (PA system with it's own insurance plan) had a program where reimbursement rates were incentivized if women had vaginal deliveries to term babies (both reducing the number of C-Sections and the number of early births). The company I work for also recently released a campaign to help raise the quality of MFM for our member hospitals (toot toot my own horn).

 

 

There are some really interesting theories as to why the C-Section rates are higher in the US. One is technology. With the monitoring that occurs during maternity care (both in the office and in the hospital), clinicians are more in tune with changes in "normal" for mother and baby. So they are more proactive with treatment. Also, the rates of litigation in the US are higher than a lot of other countries. So C-sections are considered "defensive medicine" - i.e. there wasn't anything more that could be done. Finally, reports have shown that there is a niche of truly elective C-sections (where the women request to have one) - it's <10% of all C-sections, but that could be enough to skew rates, depending on how frequent they are. 

 

From a physician standpoint, the disparity between provider billing reimbursement for Vaginal vs. C-Section is much more negligible than the hospital billing reimbursement. So, unless physicians are employed by the hospital, there isn't as much of a financial incentive as it sometimes seems. But, I'm also very much pro-hospital and pro-physician. So you can take my statements with a grain of salt.

 

If you'd like me to discuss the state of health insurance in the US, I'd be happy to. I'm very opinionated.

I should also point out that the system the government has set up is designed to screw hospitals. All hospitals have to contract with Press-Gainey to have patient satisfaction surveys sent out. The rate of patient satisfaction determines the rate of medicare and medicaid (the government run insurance: medicare for old people and medicaid for people under 65 that qualify) reimbursements. Unfortunately, often only people with an ax to grind fill out the surveys, skewing the numbers down. Also, being grumpy about the food can lead people to give low scores. Hospitals are actually going to a room service model of food and nutrition for patients to combat this. I'm not kidding. Furthermore, the expectations are skewed so that anything less than perfect disproportionately pulls down the ratings. My cynicism says there are two reasons for this system. The first is that the survey company makes a hell of a lot of money, and they lobbied hard to make the surveys part of the system. The second is that the system makes it so hard for hospitals to get a good score so that funding can be cut and thus have a sneaky way to cut medicaid and medicare costs. 

 

Remember when I said the problems of US health care are so multi-faceted there is no one solution?

 

Sylvaa is right about the on-demand C-sections. Some mothers opt to have them so they can have the birthday they want for the child. I'm not kidding. Other times, the doctors will influence the mothers to schedule a c-section to make the OBGYN's schedule more predictable. I only hear about this anecdotally, so I have no idea how wide-spread the problem is. Sylvaa is also right about defensive medicine. We are a litigious society, and doctors have to take out huge malpractice insurance premiums. That's part of what drives up the cost of health care. Sometimes doctors will simply move forward with a c-section to shut a mother up. Again, this is rare, but it happens.

3 minutes ago, Rinna said:

 

I feel like this could start a war.  Everyone has their thoughts & feelings about healthcare, and it’s issues/shortcomings.

 

 

I recently learned to stay away from stand alone Emergency Rooms.   They coded my son at the highest level, a 5, which is what they code heart attacks and other life threatening events.  He needed an inhaler.  Had to fight to get it reduced.  

As long as we stick to defining the problem we can all be united in our complaining. The wars only happen when people start proposing solutions ;) You are very correct about standalone ERs. They are a predatory cancer.

 

Here's another problem that drives up the cost of healthcare. Americans tend to ignore preventative medicine (regular checkups, annual physicals, etc) for a variety of reasons. For some it's cost. Doctors make you pay up front at the office, hospitals don't bill you until later, and for people whose credit is shot or non-existant, ignoring one more bill is not that big of a deal. Even some people who can afford preventative care ignore it because lazy. When I worked in a hospital that had both an adult and children's ER, we had some parents who treated the ER as their Primary care doctor. I've heard stories from nurses of some mothers who try to name an ER (Emergency room, A&E for our British Friends) doc as their PCP (Primary care physician). Others will find a favorite doctor, learn their schedule, and only come to the ER when they think that doctor is working. This is a two-fold problem. One, ER visits are astronomically more expensive, and people don't often pay their bills. This drives the cost up for everyone else. Two, people let problems get worse instead of treating them early, requiring more expensive interventions to fix a problem that could have been dealt with far earlier and for less money.

 

A multi-faceted problem indeed. Take into account as well, my views, observations and anecdotes are just that: guesses and theories of one who observes. Imagine what systematic study of the problem by people with no ax to grind would reveal.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very interesting.. I had no idea it was that multifaceted. 

It would seem hard to always trust that people have your best interest at heart, which is perhaps what sucks the most about the whole thing. And sheds some light on the vaccination issue. (ohh) 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, KB Girl said:

It would seem hard to always trust that people have your best interest at heart,

 

Sadly, I don’t think any of them have my best interests at heart.  I’ve gotten to where I trust no one.  We had a dentist in the past who insisted that my hubby had a cavity that needed filling.  He cancelled the appt due to schedule conflict and “forgot” to reschedule.  The next time he was in, there was no mention of the cavity, and he got a favorable report (all good, no issues).  Hello?  What about that cavity that was such a big deal?  Which makes me think that the cavity my daughter had filled was non existent.  My theory?  We take decent care of our teeth and never need any “work”. Therefore he was making no money off us since insurance always covered the cleanings.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, KB Girl said:

Very interesting.. I had no idea it was that multifaceted. 

It would seem hard to always trust that people have your best interest at heart, which is perhaps what sucks the most about the whole thing. And sheds some light on the vaccination issue. (ohh) 

People are people, no matter what country they are from, the systems are different, and may expose different parts of human nature, but people are people the world over.

1 hour ago, Rinna said:

 

Sadly, I don’t think any of them have my best interests at heart.  I’ve gotten to where I trust no one.  We had a dentist in the past who insisted that my hubby had a cavity that needed filling.  He cancelled the appt due to schedule conflict and “forgot” to reschedule.  The next time he was in, there was no mention of the cavity, and he got a favorable report (all good, no issues).  Hello?  What about that cavity that was such a big deal?  Which makes me think that the cavity my daughter had filled was non existent.  My theory?  We take decent care of our teeth and never need any “work”. Therefore he was making no money off us since insurance always covered the cleanings.  

I fired a dentist for finding too many excuses to drill.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today is a good day.

 

We worked on the house some more, got pretty much everything hung up downstairs. I made lunch, we had a salad kit on the side. The main course was some orzo I cooked, with some chopped chicken thighs cooked in Greek Seasoning, salt, white wine vinegar, and avocado oil. I should mention here our stove (electric, but flat top rather than the exposed coils) works better with my cast iron skillet than any stove I've used since getting it. After the chicken was done I set it aside and sauteed some onion and garlic, then mixed that in with unsweetened Greek Yogurt (full fat). I put the chicken back in the cast iron with the orzo and warmed it all back up. The yogurt got served over the chicken and orzo.

jIwvBU4.jpg?1

 

After lunch we went to Ikea and got a chair and ottoman for holding the baby while we feed her, as well as a coat stand and a shoe rack for the living room. We are going to get a wall mounted hat rack as well, but it was out of stock. We'll get it when it comes in.

oiS13yz.jpg

zxvIq4G.jpg

fhzvz3D.jpg

@Starpuck there are some teaser pics of the house.

 

After that was pizza at  place around the corner, it was really good. The crust was crispy on the outside and soft on the inside, the sauce was just right, the cheese was creamy and the toppings were good. I also had an excellent local lager from the tap. After that we came home and met another neighbor (good people), and I organized the garage.

  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yummo food pics.  Oh I have so missed those!

 

Glad to hear things are going well.   Hah, that picture is so fun.  Sleepy Tank is sleepy.        Thanks for the teasers... moar please!

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow this whole healthcare conversation is fascinating. I know dribs and drabs from just living in the US and going to doctor's all my life and a small amount of ER visits/billing errors but I'm amazed at this conversation tbh.

 

I LOVE that coat rack!!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/23/2019 at 12:05 AM, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

that allowed hospitals to operate as for-profit businesses.

Here with us, those private hospitals are the only ones that actually still operate and where you get better. State hospitals, or non-profits are not a place you want to go if you're sick.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Starpuck said:

Yummo food pics.  Oh I have so missed those!

 

Glad to hear things are going well.   Hah, that picture is so fun.  Sleepy Tank is sleepy.        Thanks for the teasers... moar please!

 

You'll get moar pics..eventually.

1 hour ago, Raxie said:

Wow this whole healthcare conversation is fascinating. I know dribs and drabs from just living in the US and going to doctor's all my life and a small amount of ER visits/billing errors but I'm amazed at this conversation tbh.

 

I LOVE that coat rack!!

It is a nice coat rack!

7 minutes ago, ElizeElvinFoxRyder said:

Here with us, those private hospitals are the only ones that actually still operate and where you get better. State hospitals, or non-profits are not a place you want to go if you're sick.

Yeah, I can imagine the situation over there would be different.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

fhzvz3D.jpg

That chair looks perfect for napping with a baby lying on your chest... I miss those days. Enjoy!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, GoodDoug said:

That chair looks perfect for napping with a baby lying on your chest... I miss those days. Enjoy!

That was a big consideration.

 

Today is a good day, got a great haircut,

hjUuMYQ.jpg

and came home and had lunch. Our crib and bedding for the crib came in today as well. We met our doula and really liked her when she came for a home visit, we are going to stick with her. We then went grocery shopping, then came home and I put the crib together.

4xRZwdy.jpg?1

We went to our small group and on the way saw TONS of deer. Sorry, we didn't think to take any pics. We are having unseasonable cool weather right now, so we drove home with the windows down and the sun roof open. Right now I'm batch cooking lunches.

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/24/2019 at 9:15 AM, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

Sylvaa is right about the on-demand C-sections. Some mothers opt to have them so they can have the birthday they want for the child. I'm not kidding. Other times, the doctors will influence the mothers to schedule a c-section to make the OBGYN's schedule more predictable. I only hear about this anecdotally, so I have no idea how wide-spread the problem is. Sylvaa is also right about defensive medicine. We are a litigious society, and doctors have to take out huge malpractice insurance premiums. That's part of what drives up the cost of health care. Sometimes doctors will simply move forward with a c-section to shut a mother up. Again, this is rare, but it happens.

 

Yeah...this is a thing for sure. I've known women to schedule their c-section after finding out they were pregnant. I HUGE part of me wants to talk them out of it but know that's not really my place. I mean...it's freakin major surgery, yo! Now, I'm not a women, and I know certain cases call for a c-section, (like when Heather had to have one with Trixie and Racer), but I just don't understand the desire to be cut open when God designed a woman's body to give birth. Once again, I am not a women, so I don't or won't ever understand the pain or things involved with giving birth. I'm just going off and living vicariously through my wife who's had both: 2 natural births and 2 c-sections. 

 

Anyways, I feel like this is a messy topic of discussion and just wanted to input my own personal journey with c-sections. /rant over

 

10 hours ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

We are having unseasonable cool weather right now

 

Riiiiiight?! I'm loving it! 

 

Wolf

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now