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Harriet

Harriet’s Year of Transformation ACT X

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If you had asthma ten years ago, chances are good that you still have it, and that's why cardio exhausts you more than other forms of exercise that don't require deep and fast breathing to keep the muscles in enough oxygen.

 

Asthma is a medical condition that affects the lungs and all the little airways in and around them. And as much as we wish for it to be otherwise, the vast majority of medical conditions cannot be cured by switching over to a healthier lifestyle. They can be alleviated or managed by making lifestyle changes, but beyond that, medical treatments tend to be needed.

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35 minutes ago, scalyfreak said:

If you had asthma ten years ago, chances are good that you still have it, and that's why cardio exhausts you more than other forms of exercise that don't require deep and fast breathing to keep the muscles in enough oxygen.


I'm not certain I had it. I'm kinda sceptical, because the doc said that I had it when I mentioned a couple of things (chest tightness when drinking cold smoothies and getting out of breath walking up stairs), there was no test and I thought it could just be unfitness. Why jump to a diagnosis when a simpler explanation is at hand? But then I did apparently have a ventilator when I was a small child. Ehhhhhh I hate seeing doctors but it's probably worth finding out one way or another.

But then the other question is, why do I get super tired jogging and walking up gentle hills when I can manage sprinting and kicking pretty well (kicking is a bit like sprinting: intense, but with short breaks)? 

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18 minutes ago, Harriet said:


I'm not certain I had it. I'm kinda sceptical, because the doc said that I had it when I mentioned a couple of things (chest tightness when drinking cold smoothies and getting out of breath walking up stairs), there was no test and I thought it could just be unfitness. Why jump to a diagnosis when a simpler explanation is at hand? But then I did apparently have a ventilator when I was a small child. Ehhhhhh I hate seeing doctors but it's probably worth finding out one way or another.

 

It is definitely worth it. Diagnosed medical conditions can be treated, after all. 

 

When it comes to asthma, it's actually an inflammatory disease, and an inflammation that is left untreated for too long can cause lasting damage. At least, that's what my doctor said when he diagnosed my asthma and prescribed inhalers for me. :) 

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15 minutes ago, scalyfreak said:

 

It is definitely worth it. Diagnosed medical conditions can be treated, after all. 

 

When it comes to asthma, it's actually an inflammatory disease, and an inflammation that is left untreated for too long can cause lasting damage. At least, that's what my doctor said when he diagnosed my asthma and prescribed inhalers for me. :) 


I guess that means not seeing a doctor would be stupid and irresponsible and there's really no way I can justifiably listen to the fool part of me that's like "nah, she'll be right".

Your writing these sensible things is very helpful in shoring up the small non-idiot fraction. Thank you. 

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6 hours ago, Harriet said:

But then the other question is, why do I get super tired jogging and walking up gentle hills when I can manage sprinting and kicking pretty well (kicking is a bit like sprinting: intense, but with short breaks)? 

 

Running uphill is a pretty different thing than running on a flat trail: I can mainly rest by running not too quickly on the flat, not so much with even a small incline. Beating gravity seems like a harder deal than just facing air resistance and a few frictional forces.

 

Also, running and lifting seem to be using different muscles. I'm at a really low level but I've run a tiny bit and when I've decided that squats were finally a thing I could try, my first few squats left me legs soaked for a few days.

 

Breathing is a pretty big deal too so I'd say there are enough differences that jumping back into running feels hard. I'd not worry too much on it and just have some running as part of my training regimen if you want to practice it again. Alterning lifting and running days could be an option.

 

Have fun reaching that well rounded able-to-perform-any-kind-of-physical-action shape! :)

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8 hours ago, Jean said:

Breathing is a pretty big deal too so I'd say there are enough differences that jumping back into running feels hard. I'd not worry too much on it and just have some running as part of my training regimen if you want to practice it again. Alterning lifting and running days could be an option.


I don't, I really don't. I despise running, and I have shin splints. It's just that the taekwondo instructors ask us to run as part of our warmups. I'm going to have to practice using my facial muscles to form sounds such as "no, thanks," when pressed by the more excitable instructors. 

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2 hours ago, Harriet said:

I'm going to have to practice using my facial muscles to form sounds such as "no, thanks,"

 

Pretty hard practice, that! Kuddos if you manage to both put this plan into motion and have them give up on trying with time. ^^

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Challenge summary:

 

Well, I did stop buying chocolate as an everyday grocery, so that's a tiny win.

 

I did not succeed in colonising the groggy hours of the afternoon.  Same story as usual. I make a plan to be more industrious, follow it for a bit, then relapse. I did download a computer programme that can block the internet and specific other programmes for certain time periods, and I actually scheduled an internet block from 7am to 10am every day for the last week. I'm wondering if I might be able to use this to beat back the indolence and procrastination a little in the coming challenges. But honestly, sometimes when there's no internet I just sit and drink tea and stare at nothing for an hour. 


I started the challenge with some nagging aches during my lifts, and actually saw a couple of lifts regress. I took two weeks off for travel and recovery, and did some programme rethinking. Hypertrophy hubris is currently more hubris than hypertrophy, but we shall see what comes with time.

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