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theflyingaccountant

Respawned: Building the Habit

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3 hours ago, analoggirl said:

Good going!

 

& You already said so before. I will paraphrase probably. You cannot work on something you have not defined. And to define something, you usually need data. And so you write down your thoughts. And maybe see a pattern.

 

A dude a long time ago said something I found incredibly annoying in high school:

 

"The purpose of life is to live life with a purpose."

 

It sounded like he was trying to be deep and failing. But it kind of makes sense to me now. So if you like the thought, maybe in the future as well, here you go.

 

I do like the thought. Think I'll borrow that one. Thanks!

 

Speaking of which, I think I realized today that it's time to start pointing these habits at some more tangible goals. I think part of why I'm feeling this way is that these habits just feel like something I'm doing just to be able to do it. I'm traveling again next week, but while I'm on the road, maybe I can put some thought toward some potential milestones for some of these habits. That way it doesn't just feel like stuff that I'm doing to keep myself busy.

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So much of what you said in your post hits home with me, there's got to be more to it than this linear progression through Study, Work, Retire, Die model we all seem to have been programmed to aspire to.

 

I think it's got to be about enjoying the journey.  Do things which make you happy, scared, grow everyday and hopefully you will stumble across the connections and opportunities that will allow meaning to find you.

 

Or some such pop psycholgical mumbo jumbo!

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On 10/4/2019 at 12:16 PM, theflyingaccountant said:

 

I am definitely stealing that idea. Originally, once I got deep into it, my plan was to start watching Italian kids' shows on YouTube, but come to think of it, that approach may work better. Thanks!

 

The kids' YouTube videos are also a great idea. Watching them with the Italian subtitles on would help your brain to associate what it's hearing with the actual words.

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Day 9 Progress Report:

 

Travelin' this week.

 

The War:

Get a private pilot's license and have enough money to be able to enjoy it.

 

The Financial Campaign:

1. Build up a minimum non-retirement savings of $20,000.

 

The Physical Campaign:

2. Keep my body healthy so that I can enjoy flying as I get older.

 

Main Effort: Meditate daily.

Level 1: Meditate for a minimum of 3 minutes each morning before work.

Meditation time: 3+ minutes.

 

Supporting Effort 1. Control my cravings.

Level 1: Limit myself to a maximum of 2 drinks per day.

Drinks consumed: 0

 

Supporting Effort 2. Do things with my body every day.

Level 1a: Do one barbell squat with empty barbell after I get home from work.

Level 1b: Do one pushup after I get home from work.

Squats done: 1+

Pushups done: 0

 

Supporting Effort 3. Establish a daily study habit.

Level 1: Study for the CISA exam for at least 5 minutes each morning after I meditate.

Study time: 5+ minutes

 

Bonus Habit 1.

Level 1: Update the budget spreadsheet for basic daily purchases every evening before bed.

Budget updated: No.
  

Bonus Habit 2.

Level 1: Play piano for 5 minutes after doing my barbell squat.

Playing time: 5+ minutes.

 

Bonus Habit 3.

Level 1: Study one Duolingo Italian lesson

Lessons studied: 1

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23 hours ago, theflyingaccountant said:

 

You work work work work work then have fun for a little bit and then your body falls apart and that's it?

 

It sounds so utterly bleak. Like I'm scaling this huge mountain only to celebrate my triumph once I reach the summit, and then take a flying leap off into oblivion.

 

There has to be much more to life than a tiny flash of joy embedded in a huge pile of struggle.

 


If work is punishment and retirement/fun stuff is the reward, then yeah, that sounds bleak. I would look at it in a different way. You have to find valuable things throughout your life. By valuable, I don't mean fun, joy or happiness. Those are important ingredients, but they're not enough. And aiming directly at happiness tends to fail. You also need: meaning; connections with other people; connection with nature; tasks that challenge you and allow you to enter a flow state; the opportunity to contribute to something bigger than yourself; the cultivation of moral character virtues; and the cultivation of greater skills and knowledge. Well, those are on my list, anyway. You can't wait until your job/career is finished to find these things. They need to be woven into your whole life as much as possible. I realise that can be super friggin hard if your job takes up most of your time and mental energy, especially if your job doesn't feel challenging, meaningful, and like it's contributing to something good and bigger. But yeah. It might be worth shifting the focus slightly to meaning rather than enjoyment. Enjoyment is easy. Enjoyment is cupcakes. Mmm. 

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Day 10 Progress Report:


Mobile version doesn’t give me the option to change text colors. So, for this week, the red/green stuff will be somewhat misleading. Sorry bout that. 
 

The War:

Get a private pilot's license and have enough money to be able to enjoy it.

 

The Financial Campaign:

1. Build up a minimum non-retirement savings of $20,000.

 

The Physical Campaign:

2. Keep my body healthy so that I can enjoy flying as I get older.

 

Main Effort: Meditate daily.

Level 1: Meditate for a minimum of 3 minutes each morning before work.

Meditation time: 3+ minutes.

 

Supporting Effort 1. Control my cravings.

Level 1: Limit myself to a maximum of 2 drinks per day.

Drinks consumed: 0

 

Supporting Effort 2. Do things with my body every day.

Level 1a: Do one barbell squat with empty barbell after I get home from work.

Level 1b: Do one pushup after I get home from work.

Squats done: 0

Pushups done: 1+

 

Supporting Effort 3. Establish a daily study habit.

Level 1: Study for the CISA exam for at least 5 minutes each morning after I meditate.

Study time: 5+ minutes

 

Bonus Habit 1.

Level 1: Update the budget spreadsheet for basic daily purchases every evening before bed.

Budget updated: Yes. 
  

Bonus Habit 2.

Level 1: Play piano for 5 minutes after doing my barbell squat.

Playing time: 5+ minutes.

-No piano to be had. Will study from my Mark Levine Jazz book instead. 

 

Bonus Habit 3.

Level 1: Study one Duolingo Italian lesson

Lessons studied: 1+

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On 10/7/2019 at 1:44 PM, Harriet said:


If work is punishment and retirement/fun stuff is the reward, then yeah, that sounds bleak. I would look at it in a different way. You have to find valuable things throughout your life. By valuable, I don't mean fun, joy or happiness. Those are important ingredients, but they're not enough. And aiming directly at happiness tends to fail. You also need: meaning; connections with other people; connection with nature; tasks that challenge you and allow you to enter a flow state; the opportunity to contribute to something bigger than yourself; the cultivation of moral character virtues; and the cultivation of greater skills and knowledge. Well, those are on my list, anyway. You can't wait until your job/career is finished to find these things. They need to be woven into your whole life as much as possible. I realise that can be super friggin hard if your job takes up most of your time and mental energy, especially if your job doesn't feel challenging, meaningful, and like it's contributing to something good and bigger. But yeah. It might be worth shifting the focus slightly to meaning rather than enjoyment. Enjoyment is easy. Enjoyment is cupcakes. Mmm. 


Yeah, that’s one of those “my superego believes it but my id doesn’t” sort of areas. Totally agree with you on all points. At least, my mind right now does. Once I get into one of those bad spots, well, that other guy, he may not. 
 

The hard part for me is figuring out what that guy really needs. I can’t just ignore him, you know? It just makes him holler louder. I’ve got to let him in and make him comfortable, but remind him that while he gets a voice, he doesn’t get to drive the ship. Know what I mean? 

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Day 11 Progress

 

Woke up at 4:15 today. Worked 11 hours. It sucked. The end. 

 

The War:

Get a private pilot's license and have enough money to be able to enjoy it.

 

The Financial Campaign:

1. Build up a minimum non-retirement savings of $20,000.

 

The Physical Campaign:

2. Keep my body healthy so that I can enjoy flying as I get older.

 

Main Effort: Meditate daily.

Level 1: Meditate for a minimum of 3 minutes each morning before work.

Meditation time: 3+ minutes.

 

Supporting Effort 1. Control my cravings.

Level 1: Limit myself to a maximum of 2 drinks per day.

Drinks consumed: 3

 

Supporting Effort 2. Do things with my body every day.

Level 1a: Do one barbell squat with empty barbell after I get home from work.

Level 1b: Do one pushup after I get home from work.

Squats done: 0

Pushups done: 1+

 

Supporting Effort 3. Establish a daily study habit.

Level 1: Study for the CISA exam for at least 5 minutes each morning after I meditate.

Study time: 5+ minutes

 

Bonus Habit 1.

Level 1: Update the budget spreadsheet for basic daily purchases every evening before bed.

Budget updated: Yes
  

Bonus Habit 2.

Level 1: Play piano for 5 minutes after doing my barbell squat.

Playing time: 0 minutes.

Book study ain’t working out. Just gonna wait till I get home for this one. 

 

Bonus Habit 3.

Level 1: Study one Duolingo Italian lesson

Lessons studied: 1+

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On 10/8/2019 at 3:44 PM, theflyingaccountant said:


Yeah, that’s one of those “my superego believes it but my id doesn’t” sort of areas. Totally agree with you on all points. At least, my mind right now does. Once I get into one of those bad spots, well, that other guy, he may not. 
 

The hard part for me is figuring out what that guy really needs. I can’t just ignore him, you know? It just makes him holler louder. I’ve got to let him in and make him comfortable, but remind him that while he gets a voice, he doesn’t get to drive the ship. Know what I mean? 


You mean what the negative-voice guy needs? It depends. In my experience, reasoning with (irrational) negative thoughts makes them more persistent. What quiets them (for me) is getting enough rest, exercise, meditation, journaling about what's worrying me, a normal, non-binge amount of cupcakes and video games... you know, normal self-care stuff. But that's only for unreasonable negative thoughts. If I have really negative thoughts about where my life is going that are totally justified, the only thing that quiets that is making some actual changes and progress.

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56 minutes ago, Harriet said:


You mean what the negative-voice guy needs? It depends. In my experience, reasoning with (irrational) negative thoughts makes them more persistent. What quiets them (for me) is getting enough rest, exercise, meditation, journaling about what's worrying me, a normal, non-binge amount of cupcakes and video games... you know, normal self-care stuff. But that's only for unreasonable negative thoughts. If I have really negative thoughts about where my life is going that are totally justified, the only thing that quiets that is making some actual changes and progress.

 

I definitely agree with you there. 
 

I’mma take it up a notch you’ll allow me. There’s reasoning with and there’s accepting and allowing to exist. Maybe it’s like a toddler. I don’t believe one should be reasoning with a toddler who is throwing a raucous temper tantrum (though, to be honest, I’ve never had kids so what do I know?). Neither does that mean you kick the kid out on to the street or beat the kid senseless for just behaving like a toddler. 

 

But like you said: If a toddler isn’t getting enough rest or exercise or has been getting too much cupcakes and video games, well...bring on the tantrums. 
 

(again-not a parent, so not an authority on this subject by any means.)

 

I used to hate myself for feeling what I felt. Not only would I do the thing that would make me feel ashamed about what I did, but I would then feel ashamed that I felt ashamed. Or feel paralyzed with guilt because “I failed yet again.” And what I should be doing is just re-evaluating. Have I been taking care of myself? Getting enough sleep? Exercise? Meditation? The right foods? And if all of those are yes, the question then becomes “Am I on a path to being the person I want to be or something else entirely?”

 

(and, more often than not, y’all end up being my audience to my journaling. Long as y’all are okay with it, at least.)

 

Edit: Thought I’d toss out that I try not to look at it as “negative” and “positive” though that’s usually how it shakes out. More like primal and civilized or superego and id. My primal side (id) is there for a reason. He tries to keep me safe from harm, and I believe he wants what’s best for me. But he’s not driven by rational thought. He’s driven by emotion (usually fear, anger, and desire). He’s the same thing that drives me to love music and art and delicious food and sex and all that stuff. So I don’t see him as negative. Just not logic and fact-based. 

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I'll add my stance to the mix.

 

The toddler is the one bugging you about not getting enough care and not having enough fun.

 

The negative self-limiting belief is quantifying what you WANT to (playing the piano) as useless or serving no purpose.

 

You get to shape your reality! And some things are just meant to be done. Like learning how to play the piano. 

 

I cannot help you with the workthendie paradigm though. We just have to find a way to be the change we want to see. Dunno how yet.

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3 hours ago, theflyingaccountant said:

Thought I’d toss out that I try not to look at it as “negative” and “positive” though that’s usually how it shakes out. More like primal and civilized or superego and id. My primal side (id) is there for a reason. 

 

Interesting take. I come at it from a different perspective because I have had depression, where intrusive, irrationally negative thoughts are really common and almost never helpful (they get worse when self care slips). I guess I have a primal voice, too, but mostly it wants me to skip all adult obligations, drink wine and eat cupcakes, so not the worst enemy, just an occasional hindrance. 

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17 hours ago, Harriet said:

I guess I have a primal voice, too, but mostly it wants me to ...drink wine...

I had an insightful encounter with that voice one night that taught me a lot about how my own primal voice work. I had a silly argument at a restaurant with my wife, and since we rode separately, I had time to think. That voice kept saying “I need a beer, I need a beer” over and over. Practically screaming it. And I just invited it in and investigated why it was making so much racket. 
 

 “Why do you need a beer?” “Because I’m angry.” “How will a beer help your anger?” “It will soothe me.” “So what you really want is soothing, isn’t it?” “Yes.” “How about some hot tea instead?” “Okay. That’ll work.”

 

It was a rare flash of insight and probably one of the first times I was able to pull it off (also showed me the power of a regular meditation practice), but it taught me a lot about what listening to my own mind can do for me.

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On 10/10/2019 at 12:48 AM, analoggirl said:

I cannot help you with the workthendie paradigm though. We just have to find a way to be the change we want to see. Dunno how yet.

Maybe that's the attitude to have, though. It's just a paradigm, right? If it doesn't work, I can take it off and put a new one on.

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Day 12 Progress

 

Home again. Finally got around to putting this one back up. Also fixed the color and formatting on my previous two posts.

 

The War:

Get a private pilot's license and have enough money to be able to enjoy it.

 

The Financial Campaign:

1. Build up a minimum non-retirement savings of $20,000.

 

The Physical Campaign:

2. Keep my body healthy so that I can enjoy flying as I get older.

 

Main Effort: Meditate daily.

Level 1: Meditate for a minimum of 3 minutes each morning before work.

Meditation time: 5+ minutes.

 

Supporting Effort 1. Control my cravings.

Level 1: Limit myself to a maximum of 2 drinks per day.

Drinks consumed: 3

 

Supporting Effort 2. Do things with my body every day.

Level 1a: Do one barbell squat with empty barbell after I get home from work.

Level 1b: Do one pushup after I get home from work.

Squats done: 1+

Pushups done: 0

 

Supporting Effort 3. Establish a daily study habit.

Level 1: Study for the CISA exam for at least 5 minutes each morning after I meditate.

Study time: 0 minutes

 

Bonus Habit 1.

Level 1: Update the budget spreadsheet for basic daily purchases every evening before bed.

Budget updated: No
  

Bonus Habit 2.

Level 1: Play piano for 5 minutes after doing my barbell squat.

Playing time: 5+ minutes.

 

Bonus Habit 3.

Level 1: Study one Duolingo Italian lesson

Lessons studied: A whole bunch.

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Day 13 Progress

 

Camping trip today. I'm on the challenge formally until I leave for camping at which point, I will suspend it for the rest of today and all of tomorrow.

 

The War:

Get a private pilot's license and have enough money to be able to enjoy it.

 

The Financial Campaign:

1. Build up a minimum non-retirement savings of $20,000.

 

The Physical Campaign:

2. Keep my body healthy so that I can enjoy flying as I get older.

 

Main Effort: Meditate daily.

Level 1: Meditate for a minimum of 3 minutes each morning before work.

Meditation time: 0 minutes.

 

Supporting Effort 1. Control my cravings.

Level 1: Limit myself to a maximum of 2 drinks per day.

Drinks consumed: 0

 

Supporting Effort 2. Do things with my body every day.

Level 1a: Do one barbell squat with empty barbell after I get home from work.

Level 1b: Do one pushup after I get home from work.

Squats done: 0

Pushups done: 1+

 

Supporting Effort 3. Establish a daily study habit.

Level 1: Study for the CISA exam for at least 5 minutes each morning after I meditate.

Study time: 5+ minutes

 

Bonus Habit 1.

Level 1: Update the budget spreadsheet for basic daily purchases every evening before bed.

Budget updated: Yes
  

Bonus Habit 2.

Level 1: Play piano for 5 minutes after doing my barbell squat.

Playing time: 5+ minutes.

 

Bonus Habit 3.

Level 1: Study one Duolingo Italian lesson

Lessons studied: 1

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On 10/10/2019 at 1:04 PM, theflyingaccountant said:

I had an insightful encounter with that voice one night that taught me a lot about how my own primal voice work. I had a silly argument at a restaurant with my wife, and since we rode separately, I had time to think. That voice kept saying “I need a beer, I need a beer” over and over. Practically screaming it. And I just invited it in and investigated why it was making so much racket. 
 

 “Why do you need a beer?” “Because I’m angry.” “How will a beer help your anger?” “It will soothe me.” “So what you really want is soothing, isn’t it?” “Yes.” “How about some hot tea instead?” “Okay. That’ll work.”

 

It was a rare flash of insight and probably one of the first times I was able to pull it off (also showed me the power of a regular meditation practice), but it taught me a lot about what listening to my own mind can do for me.


Excellent work there. It's really hard to notice and step away from an intense feeling in the moment. I did it too, recently. So my flight to Oslo was delayed, and I therefore missed the connection to Hamburg. It only comes once a day, so I had to stay in Oslo for 22 hours. I was tired after a long, sleepless flight, organisational stuff like this stresses me out, and it was a bit of extra effort checking out the bags, then walking around the airport asking different people about the hotel. I found the right person eventually and they told me to go outside and get a bus. So I went to the stop they told me, and got on a bus. I showed the driver the bit of paper that had the name of the hotel and he waved me onto the bus. He obviously didn't read the paper though, because I found out later he didn't stop at MY hotel. As we were driving back to the airport I felt so frustrated and was thinking about ways to let him feel my displeasure. But then I thought "It's objectively not so bad. The bus itself is not uncomfortable, and it has added on 25 minutes to my total time." The quote from Hamlet popped into my head "Nothing is either good or bad but thinking makes it so" and decided to let it go. After making the decision, my mood improved considerably. 

Now if there's some way to get better at this in-the-moment mood checking... probably meditation and practice, I guess. 

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On 10/11/2019 at 10:11 AM, Harriet said:


Excellent work there. It's really hard to notice and step away from an intense feeling in the moment. I did it too, recently. So my flight to Oslo was delayed, and I therefore missed the connection to Hamburg. It only comes once a day, so I had to stay in Oslo for 22 hours. I was tired after a long, sleepless flight, organisational stuff like this stresses me out, and it was a bit of extra effort checking out the bags, then walking around the airport asking different people about the hotel. I found the right person eventually and they told me to go outside and get a bus. So I went to the stop they told me, and got on a bus. I showed the driver the bit of paper that had the name of the hotel and he waved me onto the bus. He obviously didn't read the paper though, because I found out later he didn't stop at MY hotel. As we were driving back to the airport I felt so frustrated and was thinking about ways to let him feel my displeasure. But then I thought "It's objectively not so bad. The bus itself is not uncomfortable, and it has added on 25 minutes to my total time." The quote from Hamlet popped into my head "Nothing is either good or bad but thinking makes it so" and decided to let it go. After making the decision, my mood improved considerably.

 

Oh man, that would have utterly stressed me out. Even more so since I don't even speak the language. Not to mention being trapped in ye olde giant-metal-tube-with-wings. You definitely handled the situation much better than I did for sure.

 

The last time I *almost* missed a connection flight, I did not at all handle it the way you did. I basically panicked, texting my wife over and over about how I'm going to get stuck in this airport, they're gonna charge me for another flight, etc. Turns out, I was freaking out over nothing, but yeah. Totally lost my cool.

 

As far as I can tell, it was meditation that taught me the trick to begin with, and I've heard that doing a little bit every day makes you better at that sort of thing. That's why I made it part of my challenge, at least.

 

Much respect for the Hamlet quote, btw.

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Day 15.

 

The War:

Get a private pilot's license and have enough money to be able to enjoy it.

 

The Financial Campaign:

1. Build up a minimum non-retirement savings of $20,000.

 

The Physical Campaign:

2. Keep my body healthy so that I can enjoy flying as I get older.

 

Main Effort: Meditate daily.

Level 1: Meditate for a minimum of 3 minutes each morning before work.

Meditation time: 5+ minutes.

 

Supporting Effort 1. Control my cravings.

Level 1: Limit myself to a maximum of 2 drinks per day.

Drinks consumed: 0

 

Supporting Effort 2. Do things with my body every day.

Level 1a: Do one barbell squat with empty barbell after I get home from work.

Level 1b: Do one pushup after I get home from work.

Squats done: 1+

Pushups done: 0

 

Supporting Effort 3. Establish a daily study habit.

Level 1: Study for the CISA exam for at least 5 minutes each morning after I meditate.

Study time: 0 minutes

 

Bonus Habit 1.

Level 1: Update the budget spreadsheet for basic daily purchases every evening before bed.

Budget updated: Yes
  

Bonus Habit 2.

Level 1: Play piano for 5 minutes after doing my barbell squat.

Playing time: 5+ minutes.

 

Bonus Habit 3.

Level 1: Study one Duolingo Italian lesson

Lessons studied: 1+

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Due to several long drives over the week, I've had a lot of time to do some reflecting on how I've been handling this challenge and what my goals are for future challenges.

 

One of the biggest faults that I've found with my current challenge, in fact, are that these habits, while they're useful, don't really take me anywhere. They're just things that I'm doing over and over, day in and day out, but without any sort of end game in mind.

 

The other problem that I'm seeing deals with goal-setting more broadly. Sure, I can gain a given amount of muscle or play scales at a certain speed on the piano, and that's great and all, but again, to what end? Even if I get the coveted pilot's license and a fat chunk of cash sitting in the bank, so what?

 

And yeah, that's definitely a familiar refrain of mine.

 

I think a lot of that's because my focus is wrong. Instead of focusing on snagging big win after big win, I think it's time that I looked toward what it is that I'm becoming.

 

I'm not just a body moving through space. I'm also a body moving through time. And that means that I'm becoming something. I'm always becoming something, even if it's just a little bit older. I can become more bitter and resentful over time. I may become sicker. I will definitely, at some point, become much weaker.

 

I can also become wiser, and I can become stronger, and I can become healthier and wealthier and more loving and more generous and kinder and more compassionate.

 

The point is that fixating on an end point will make me a better person, but it's only part of the story. What matters most for me right now is my trajectory. And the way I see it, if I can focus on my trajectory, then my goals become mere points on a line.

 

What do I want to be then? I want to be strong and wise and compassionate and wealthy and generous and brave.

 

There's roughly one week left in the challenge, so it doesn't make much sense to revise my challenge now, but I'm already looking ahead to setting up the new challenge (that I'll be posting in the Druids forum). Yes, I'm probably being a little premature with this, but, hey, think of it like this. By getting this down now, I can use my official retrospective to finalize my plans, right?

 

Anyway, here's the first draft:

 

1. Strength training-Goal will be to hit 100 lbs on Squats, Deadlift, Bench Press, and Overhead Press. I will definitely hit this goal with the squats and deadlifts, so when that happens, I'll bump those up to 150 lbs. But I know that getting the micro-wins will be what encourages me to keep going, so I'm fine with this setting. I'll also be doing an "exercise day-rest day" cadence which will allow me to actually focus on doing some quality strength work.

2. Meditation-Every day. Minimum 5 minutes. Where possible, using the 10% Happier app, but what matters is that I get one in daily.

3. Reducing alcohol consumption-To start out with, I'm shooting for an average of 14 drinks per week (2 per day) with the challenge. I did not meet my goal of consistently limiting my drinking to 2 per day, so I'm starting there, but eventually, I'd like to get down to an average of 6 drinks per week, and from there, eventually going an entire challenge without drinking at all.

4. CISA Study-The course I'm taking measures my "Readiness" in terms of my scores on questions asked. So I'm shooting for an 80% readiness score in all 5 domains.

5. Piano-120 bpm hands together for 6 major scales.

6. Italian-All Duolingo lessons down to Checkpoint 2 turned red.

7. Budget-Update daily.

8. Wake up-6 am daily.

9. Home maintenance-Clean / maintain one thing every day.

10. Food-One home-cooked meal per week.

11. No video games for the duration of the challenge.

 

Yes, there's lots of challenges here. It's my writing style to add more stuff than I need, so I'll probably cull these a little bit. I also want to tie them in to that whole "what do I want to become" approach, so there's some work to be done there as well. But it's a start.

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10 hours ago, theflyingaccountant said:

Due to several long drives over the week, I've had a lot of time to do some reflecting on how I've been handling this challenge and what my goals are for future challenges.

 

Excellent thinking work. Being strong is totally worth it; I think it can make the difference between an old age of fragility and dependence and one of mobility and independence. I'm not sure the 100lb for all four lifts is particularly balanced, though :). It would be more usual for your overhead press to be somewhere between 30-50% of your deadlift, depending on your size, sex, and degree of proficiency.

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11 hours ago, theflyingaccountant said:

I think a lot of that's because my focus is wrong. Instead of focusing on snagging big win after big win, I think it's time that I looked toward what it is that I'm becoming.

 

It sounds to me as if this epiphany could be one valuable thing to take from this challenge.

 

Have you heard of the "Last Lecture", by Randy Pausch? A great lecturer from CMU, dying from cancer, gave a talk on what should be important in life and achieving childhood dreams. It changes me every time I watch it. It's over an hour long but that's time well spent IMO --- https://youtu.be/ji5_MqicxSo. He did a follow-up lecture on time management which is also worth watching.

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Day 16.

 

The War:

Get a private pilot's license and have enough money to be able to enjoy it.

 

The Financial Campaign:

1. Build up a minimum non-retirement savings of $20,000.

 

The Physical Campaign:

2. Keep my body healthy so that I can enjoy flying as I get older.

 

Main Effort: Meditate daily.

Level 1: Meditate for a minimum of 3 minutes each morning before work.

Meditation time: 5+ minutes.

 

Supporting Effort 1. Control my cravings.

Level 1: Limit myself to a maximum of 2 drinks per day.

Drinks consumed: 2

 

Supporting Effort 2. Do things with my body every day.

Level 1a: Do one barbell squat with empty barbell after I get home from work.

Level 1b: Do one pushup after I get home from work.

Squats done: 0

Pushups done: 1+

 

Supporting Effort 3. Establish a daily study habit.

Level 1: Study for the CISA exam for at least 5 minutes each morning after I meditate.

Study time: 0 minutes

 

Bonus Habit 1.

Level 1: Update the budget spreadsheet for basic daily purchases every evening before bed.

Budget updated: Yes
  

Bonus Habit 2.

Level 1: Play piano for 5 minutes after doing my barbell squat.

Playing time: 5+ minutes.

 

Bonus Habit 3.

Level 1: Study one Duolingo Italian lesson

Lessons studied: 1+

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2 hours ago, The Hero of Time said:

 

It sounds to me as if this epiphany could be one valuable thing to take from this challenge.

 

Have you heard of the "Last Lecture", by Randy Pausch? A great lecturer from CMU, dying from cancer, gave a talk on what should be important in life and achieving childhood dreams. It changes me every time I watch it. It's over an hour long but that's time well spent IMO --- https://youtu.be/ji5_MqicxSo. He did a follow-up lecture on time management which is also worth watching.

 

"My dad always taught me that when there's an elephant in the room, introduce them."

 

Legit.

 

I don't have the time to watch it right now, but I've already got it pulled up on one of my tabs for when I get home.

 

This challenge had all sorts of epiphanies sprinkled throughout. That one was a big one though.

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