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Valette

Form Check Thread

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From an uneducated observers' perspective, it looks like there's some inconsistent knee tracking, as well as a bit of butt wink at the end of the movement. Bear in mind that I'm totally not an expert, so wait until someone more experienced chimes in, but it seems to me that @Br0din's previous suggestions for banded squats and goblet squats would be good options to focus on to address those areas?

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I'm by no means an expert either, but I think you're onto something with the banded squats/goblet squats previously mentioned.  I've been doing bulgarian split squats, single leg deadlifts, and banded lateral walks. So, I'll do some rearranging.  

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I think our similar backgrounds make us squat the same way; I just use a narrower version. Flexibility is usually a good thing, but it's actually harder to teach someone with too much flexibility how to keep the tension for maximal force production.

 

 

Biggest thing that fixed a lot of my issues was the bracing right before descent. It would set my shoulders and hips in the correct position , then I'd concentrate on maintaining the tight brace as I moved through the range of motion. (You will notice this on the second video on the thread. There was this lifter I followed on IG, but I can't find the name, who had an exaggerated inhale and brace who would have been a good visual.)

 

 

 

For pressing I like the feet hip-width, and with the same bracing technique as the squat.

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After reviewing my own videos, I felt like my OHP foot positioning felt too wide, so I brought it in to hip-width.  I wonder if there's a dynamic posture or perhaps learning push presses would be suitable now.  I feel like I've hit a limit with the Military Press style.

Aye, I was a bit surprised that it seemed to someone maybe a mobility thing when perhaps it's a stability thing.  I'm leaning toward stability.  I tried the banded squats* and can specifically say I instantly felt my quadratus femoris cramp (it was such a specific straight line of limiting, pain that ran from my ischial tuberosity to my hip joint; absolutely paused me for a few minutes).  I think we're definitely in the position where we very likely can and often do use our flexibility in our chosen sports, so I wouldn't be shocked if I never really learned how to stabilize within my full ROM. I know, in the past, I had to go to PT for habitually pained obturator internus in the left hip.

*I'm actually doing a variation where I step through the band after anchoring it to the squat rack so I specifically have to concentrate on externally rotating my hip joints to stabilize down the chain. It feels like hip joint massage for me. haha

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On 9/23/2019 at 6:29 AM, Machete said:

Flexibility is usually a good thing, but it's actually harder to teach someone with too much flexibility how to keep the tension for maximal force production.

 

16 hours ago, Valette said:

Aye, I was a bit surprised that it seemed to someone maybe a mobility thing when perhaps it's a stability thing.

 

Too much flexibility can be just as much of a problem as not enough. ;) 

 

I've had some luck improving my lateral hip stability with these:

https://www.outsideonline.com/2394437/hip-strengthening-exercises

https://uhs.princeton.edu/sites/uhs/files/documents/Pelvic-Stabilization-Hip-Strengthening.pdf

 

And, not gonna lie, I'm a BIG fan of goblet squats in general, so will give those one more plug. :P  This is an interesting commentary on mobility vs stability: https://tonygentilcore.com/2013/10/squat-assessment-mobility-stability-issue/

 

16 hours ago, Valette said:

It was such a specific straight line of limiting, pain that ran from my ischial tuberosity to my hip joint; absolutely paused me for a few minutes

Pain isn't awesome - if you still have access to the physio you were working with, might be worth touching base!

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31 minutes ago, Defining said:

 

 

Too much flexibility can be just as much of a problem as not enough. ;) 

 

You lost me lost here.  I'm just not quite seeing how it’s the issue.  :(

 

32 minutes ago, Defining said:

 

 

Too much flexibility can be just as much of a problem as not enough. ;) 

 

I've had some luck improving my lateral hip stability with these:

https://www.outsideonline.com/2394437/hip-strengthening-exercises

https://uhs.princeton.edu/sites/uhs/files/documents/Pelvic-Stabilization-Hip-Strengthening.pdf

 

And, not gonna lie, I'm a BIG fan of goblet squats in general, so will give those one more plug. :P  This is an interesting commentary on mobility vs stability: https://tonygentilcore.com/2013/10/squat-assessment-mobility-stability-issue/

 

Pain isn't awesome - if you still have access to the physio you were working with, might be worth touching base! I'll take a look at the PDF.  I just don't have a 


Yay, more exercises!  I'm an occupational therapy student so can totally confirm, yes, big difference between mobility and stability.  Lol. It definitely seems like I'm struggling to activate certain muscles if they cramp when they are exerted.  So, I'll give some more thought into stabilization.

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Yeah, Pressing seems to have a low ceiling for improvement, so what I've seen and heard works is volume and variety. Push Presses with a controlled negative can definitely break you through some overhead strength plateaus.

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On 9/25/2019 at 1:51 PM, Valette said:

You lost me lost here.  I'm just not quite seeing how it’s the issue.  :(

I'm not sure of the root cause for your own technique, you'd need to ask someone more knowledgeable than myself. I was thinking just in more general terms. For example, if someone naturally hyperextends their knees, they have to put effort into just holding the joint in a neutral position; arguably more difficult than, say, someone who needs to improve their hamstring mobility and push their legs straight without worrying about overextending.

 

Luckily, as far as I understand, the supplementary strength movements for hips and posterior chain can often solve stability AND imbalance issues in squats, so it's a bit of a moot point probably.

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