• Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Siferiax

Eating in the US?

Recommended Posts

Hi,

 

My BF and I have been successfully eating low-carb for 3 months now and we're feeling great!

(We don't identify as keto)

 

However living in The Netherlands, choosing low-carb food is relatively easy. Good cheese and good meat are easy to come by.

 

However next year we'll be visiting the US for a vacation and we're a little worried about our food options/choices there.

 

We're wondering about any tips or tricks you can provide, such as where to shop and how to read US labels. Our labels are super easy as they have per 100gr of food stuff. And I understand US labels are not that straight forward. We aim to eat foods that have no more than 5gr of carbs per 100gr of food stuff.

 

Also we'll be going to Orlando FL. Meaning we'll be visiting all of the theme parks. So anyone who has tips for those, we would much appreciate it.

 

Thanks for any help ^^

Sif

 

PS. We'll be staying at a house, so home cooking is an option we'll likely use a lot too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Low carb at restaurants is extremely difficult. However, if you are cooking, it's not that hard. The same foods that are low carb over there are low carb over there. Your biggest adjustment is probably going to be non-metric measurements on nutrition labels. Micro and Macro nutrients are usually metric, but serving sizes usually aren't. Use a unit converter on your phone.

 

Here's an info graphic. Ignore the sugar-industry propaganda about fat being bad.

8ND-17MI4kHG6PAdov-PRPr1e0sLaRDKgS4P4KhC

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Restaurants; If you order a meal that has meat, veggies and a starch (potatoes or rice) ask to swap out the starch for a second serving of veggies. If you are at a burger place , dump the bun

 

Grocery stores; usually have roasted chicken (if you are looking for pre cooked food) and a lot of them either have packaged salads or  a salad bar. The packaged salads may contain things that up your carb (craisins, sugared nuts) but they are usually in individual packets that you can dump

 

theme parks; nicer restaurants; the same as above. Grocery  stores also sell hardboiled eggs. I'm visiting DW next month, and I'm hoping that  I can grab some of these to stick in our fridge for breakfast. Also deli meat-, it may have some sugar added, but it is better. If you get a sandwich or hamburger, just dump the bread.  They usually offer  apples as a side, which dies have carbs, but it is a better choice then fries. You can get salads, but most are pre made, so any extra goodies are going to be on there (hopefully dressing is on the side) I've tried being super low carb while at Disneyland, and it was doable , but pretty hard( I was hungry). What worked better for me, was just to make the best choices I could (for example the apples slices) and not overly worry about it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah Nice, that's good to know ^^ thanks so much both of you!

Any grocery stores to specifically look for or avoid?

I do know there are differences, but I'm not sure what all the places are called :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Grocery stores are so regional it's hard to know what to tell you without knowing your itinerary, and then local people would need to give you tips.  When I see ask reddit threads about people visiting the U.S., people always mention a lot of European visitors are unprepared for how large the landmass of the Continental U.S. is. Our states are like European countries. Florida alone is four times the size of the Netherlands by surface area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm from the Orlando area so I feel pretty qualified to answer this question. I also almost never visit the theme parks so maybe not lol.

 

The main non member grocery chains here are Publix, Wal-Mart, Target, Winn-Dixie and to a lesser extent Aldi. Publix is usually the most expensive but I hate Wal-Mart and Target is too far away from my house and I always forget about Winn-Dixie so Publix (and BJs which is membership only) it is.

 

If you're buying a rotisserie chicken or any premade food, make sure to read the ingredients list (usually located under the nutrient label but not always). While we generally don't put outright poison in our food anymore (depending on how you define poison), the United States is still much less restrictive than Europe about what kinds of fillers we can put in our food, so we do. I once met someone visiting from Sweden who had a corn allergy and he couldn't eat much of anything here because they put corn in nigh everything here. In addition to corn we also put sugar, soy, sodium, food coloring, etc in everything to stretch the more expensive ingredients or make it more addictive (people generally like sugary and salty things) or extend the shelf life. Even certain produce has it - non organic apples often have a wax coating and that wax coating is often made from corn and they are not obligated to list it. (Some stores do it out of courtesy.) It is edible (food grade) so if it doesn't bother you then great. Refined seed oils are also in everything.

 

A few things to remember if you're trying to eat organic or nonGMO:

Even if Roundup isn't used as a pesticide in most of the plant's growing life, most farmers including non GMO farmers will spray their crops with Roundup just a few days before harvesting to dry out the produce a bit and make it easier to harvest on harvest day. I believe organic produce isn't allowed to do this.

 

It's pretty hard to find non vegetarian-only-fed eggs here (in my experience). Even organic free range chickens are usually vegetarian fed, which means corn, although in this case it has to be organic corn. Also eggs here are washed before they go to the grocery store so they must be stored in the fridge. No getting around that.

 

Raw dairy is hard to find in some places due to legal restrictions. General governmental consensus is that it is Really Ducking Bad For Humans but some states say it's okay to give to your pets. I think Florida is one of those states. You can find it in some pet stores maybe or in certain independent health food stores (Seeds, the one that used to be in this area, had it on a pre-order basis). Don't try to cross state lines or go through customs with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure what the weather is like in the Netherlands but Florida is hot and humid for most of the year so bring water and sunscreen. Also bring sweaters because our air conditioning is lit. Humidity drops in winter but still hangs around 50% so still kind of sticky depending on what you're used to. This is why (home grown) Floridians wear parkas in winter in 55 F weather. Those memes about Floridians wearing denim in winter are actually talking about displaced northerners lol. My denim jacket never did jack to keep me warm for anything lol.

 

Theme parks... Good luck lolol. DisneyWorld is definitely NOT the happiest place on earth. The commercials are LIES. Queues (we call them lines here) can be ridiculously long especially for new attractions. Best day of the week to go anywhere seems to be Tuesday. Traffic in the parking areas is pretty well streamlined in the parks (nowhere else lol). That's pretty much all I can tell you. People who live here are pretty much either annual passholders to everywhere or really jaded about the parks. You can probably guess which one I am lol.

 

I-4 is not under construction around Disney but if you go north (eastbound) of Universal (exit 74-75) then it most definitely is under construction and you should definitely try to avoid it when you can because not even the natives know where we're going at this point. I swear it changes daily. Even the toll roads have been obnoxiously crowded with people avoiding the construction (although they're usually still loads better). Toll stickers are absolutely worth it so make sure your rental car has one. Tolls are cheaper with the sticker too.

 

It is very rare for something to actually cost what the listed price is. Sales tax is different in each state and county and sometimes even city/town so instead of printing 501859572 different price labels for each store according to local sales tax they print the price before sales tax and that's added at the register when you go to pay.

 

Tipping is practically mandatory in most (not all!) places where a tip line is printed on the receipt. 18% of the bill (including any charges that might have been dropped - say a meal was compensated because it came out wrong - please tip as if this was still on the bill) is a pretty good rule of thumb. Places that cater to a lot of international folks tend to pre calculate tips at 15, 18, and 20% and list it on the receipt along with a reminder to please tip, especially since tipped positions minimum wage is less than regular minimum wage. (A lot of serving staff are okay with this because they earn more in tips than they would on a higher wage.)

 

Tap water is generally safe although it sometimes tastes like chlorine. We're away from the coast so there's not really any sulfur smell. Most places will give you a cup of tap water for free if you ask. Drinks are otherwise massively overpriced.

 

Please don't be dicks to the guest services staff. :D My best friend works in guest services at Universal and she has Stories.

FB_IMG_1520265435547.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now