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Kestrel Grey

High protein foods that I can actually eat?

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I always have trouble getting enough protein, especially when I'm watching my calories.  I can easily get one or two servings a day, but I should be getting 4 or 5? Since some of the common proteins don't agree with me I'm at a loss what to eat, without eating the same thing 5 meals a day every day. Any recommendations would be appreciated. 

 

Things that are commonly recommended that I don't tolerate well:

Chicken/poultry 

Eggs

Protein powders (it's not the type or additives, but something to do with the actual powdering process... I can tolerate a little brown rice protein)

Soy based protein I avoid as well.

 

Things I do well with:

Dairy, greek yogurt, etc

Beef

Fish

Lentils, beans, grains

 

It is easy enough to get greek yogurt and some legumes into my diet, but it seems a bit much to have multiple servings of beef and fish every day. Not to mention costly.

 

Do you have any recommendations? Or should I just resign myself to eating a tub of Greek yogurt at every meal?

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1 hour ago, Kestrel Grey said:

Protein powders (it's not the type or additives, but something to do with the actual powdering process... I can tolerate a little brown rice protein)

I'm sure you've experimented quite a bit with this, but there isn't really any one method that's used across all protein powder manufacturing. Personally I didn't tolerate most powders until I found an unsweetened/unflavoured supplier. Plant proteins are processed differently from dairy, differently from egg, etc. But some folks find that the concentrated protein dose isn't easy for their system to handle, so another option might be to integrate them into your cooking/baking to see if that helps? 

 

Apart from that, it's about planning, and prioritising protein-containing options over any carb/starch-only options. Eg. I only eat meat about once a month, and while I do rely on whey/casein quite a bit to hit my numbers, I also eat a ton of legumes. Sprouting can help to make that volume more palatable, but realistically if you wanted to increase your intake you'll likely need to eat several cups each of beans & dairy (yogurt/cottage cheese) every day. Think 1-2c every meal + snack. Unfortunately, yes, this also comes with additional caloric intake - hence why if you're eating lots of beans but are watching kcal, you probably can't also have rice. If you're relying more on plant-based proteins, make sure you get a good variety; dairy has a more 'complete' EAA (essential amino acid) profile, so it's marginally less of a concern there.

 

A few other ideas for you:

-defatted peanut butter powder

-nutritional yeast

-oats/wheat/quinoa

-seitan (if you tolerate gluten well)

-mycoprotein

-hemp & chia seeds

-tempeh (fermented soy, might be easier for your system to process than tofu)

 

Ultimately,  you may find that it's easiest to rejig your budget to increase the grocery allowance and add more meat to your lower calorie meal planning. And yeah, unfortunately there may be some repetition in your meals, to hit the macro/kcal goals that you have with dietary restrictions. 

 

 

You're in AB, right? There are some awesome small beef producers that will sell a quarter or a half at a decent price, If you have a chest freezer. Have you tried Winters Turkeys? They're not soy/corn fed, so that might help your poultry tolerance, and they're cheaper around xmas season. Feel free to DM if you're in yyc and I can meet up and bring you some of the whey that I use (canadianprotein.com, grass fed) so you can give that a shot too, if you'd like. I've noticed skyr popping up in the groceries lately, which is a lower kcal yogurt option that's pretty tasty. And there's nothing wrong with buying a bunch of frozen fish and cooking it with some curry sauce. ;) 

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Thanks Defining, that is a huge help!

 

8 hours ago, Defining said:

I'm sure you've experimented quite a bit with this, but there isn't really any one method that's used across all protein powder manufacturing. Personally I didn't tolerate most powders until I found an unsweetened/unflavoured supplier. Plant proteins are processed differently from dairy, differently from egg, etc. But some folks find that the concentrated protein dose isn't easy for their system to handle, so another option might be to integrate them into your cooking/baking to see if that helps? 

Good point - it might just be the concentrated dose.  I had had some success with things like protein pancakes.

 

8 hours ago, Defining said:

Apart from that, it's about planning, and prioritising protein-containing options over any carb/starch-only options. Eg. I only eat meat about once a month, and while I do rely on whey/casein quite a bit to hit my numbers, I also eat a ton of legumes. Sprouting can help to make that volume more palatable, but realistically if you wanted to increase your intake you'll likely need to eat several cups each of beans & dairy (yogurt/cottage cheese) every day. Think 1-2c every meal + snack. Unfortunately, yes, this also comes with additional caloric intake - hence why if you're eating lots of beans but are watching kcal, you probably can't also have rice. If you're relying more on plant-based proteins, make sure you get a good variety; dairy has a more 'complete' EAA (essential amino acid) profile, so it's marginally less of a concern there.

I don't actually mind eating greek yogurt or legumes multiple times a day.  It just seemed odd/wrong somehow - but it should be fine?  Sprouting is an excellent suggestion, thanks!

 

8 hours ago, Defining said:

A few other ideas for you:

-defatted peanut butter powder

-nutritional yeast

-oats/wheat/quinoa

-seitan (if you tolerate gluten well)

-mycoprotein

-hemp & chia seeds

-tempeh (fermented soy, might be easier for your system to process than tofu)

Most of these I have not encountered; do you have a recommendation of which to try first?  I do have chia seeds and I have chia pudding for breakfast sometimes, though I have to watch the calories there.  I think I tried seitan once and didn't mind it.

 

8 hours ago, Defining said:

You're in AB, right? There are some awesome small beef producers that will sell a quarter or a half at a decent price, If you have a chest freezer. Have you tried Winters Turkeys? They're not soy/corn fed, so that might help your poultry tolerance, and they're cheaper around xmas season. Feel free to DM if you're in yyc and I can meet up and bring you some of the whey that I use (canadianprotein.com, grass fed) so you can give that a shot too, if you'd like. I've noticed skyr popping up in the groceries lately, which is a lower kcal yogurt option that's pretty tasty. And there's nothing wrong with buying a bunch of frozen fish and cooking it with some curry sauce. ;) 

I like skyr. It gets used interchangeably with greek yogurt depending on what's on sale.  My freezer isn't that big, but I can afford to buy small batches of beef.  It's more a matter of not wanting to eat beef every day.  Fish I should experiment more with.  Any fish recipe I have tastes best fresh so it isn't an option for lunches/batch cooking/leftovers, but there must be plenty of recipes out there.  I have a pretty horrific experience with fish curry however - my roommates tried making it in university, and it was so vile we had to flee the house gagging.  It took days to air out.

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Quinoa is great. It's high in protein and has carbs, so it's a good mix. Do you like canned tuna/salmon/ sardines? We get really good canned salmon here, but maybe that's because of where I live. It's not as expensive as fresh, and really high in protein. I also by frozen salmon patties at Costco that are high in protein.

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5 hours ago, Kestrel Grey said:

I have a pretty horrific experience with fish curry however - my roommates tried making it in university, and it was so vile we had to flee the house gagging.  It took days to air out.

I have so much sympathy for food trauma. Let's just say....none of my family eats lasagna. :D 

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On 11/22/2019 at 10:39 PM, Kestrel Grey said:

I always have trouble getting enough protein, especially when I'm watching my calories.  I can easily get one or two servings a day, but I should be getting 4 or 5? Since some of the common proteins don't agree with me I'm at a loss what to eat, without eating the same thing 5 meals a day every day. Any recommendations would be appreciated. 

 

Things that are commonly recommended that I don't tolerate well:

Chicken/poultry 

Eggs

Protein powders (it's not the type or additives, but something to do with the actual powdering process... I can tolerate a little brown rice protein)

Soy based protein I avoid as well.

 

Things I do well with:

Dairy, greek yogurt, etc

Beef

Fish

Lentils, beans, grains

 

It is easy enough to get greek yogurt and some legumes into my diet, but it seems a bit much to have multiple servings of beef and fish every day. Not to mention costly.

 

Do you have any recommendations? Or should I just resign myself to eating a tub of Greek yogurt at every meal?

 

I usually just double-up on beef and fish servings. Cod I hear is one of the cheaper protein sources out there. I also used to eat a lot of canned tuna, which I now replaced with canned sardines.

 

How are you with collagen protein? LonoLife has a bunch of products that add a bit of easy protein throughout the day. I like their bone broth a lot, especially during the cold months.

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2 hours ago, Machete said:

 

I usually just double-up on beef and fish servings. Cod I hear is one of the cheaper protein sources out there. I also used to eat a lot of canned tuna, which I now replaced with canned sardines.

 

How are you with collagen protein? LonoLife has a bunch of products that add a bit of easy protein throughout the day. I like their bone broth a lot, especially during the cold months.

Im surprisingly okay with collagen protein, but have read it is such an incomplete protein that it doesn't help any with muscle growth/retention? I can't remember where though. 

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Just off the top of my head:

fat-free, reduced, or normal cottage cheese

fat-free GREEK yogurt. Key word being Greek. To me, regular yogurt is like eating chips. Does nothing to fill me up. On the other hand, greek yogurt can be very high in protein.

Flavored tuna & chicken packets

Protein bars (not in the cereal aisle, more toward the medical side of a store with protein drinks)

Low fat cheese

High protein, low carb bread

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