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1 hour ago, Jean said:

Thanks for these posts, it helps to let things sink in.

 

I'm glad. I think that's a difficulty everyone is having right now. It's still someone else's problem right now, not ours. That's why I wanted to talk about it.

 

2 hours ago, Jean said:

It has really dawned on me this Friday, as our government (Switzerland) took containment measures and I was still planning to meet friends, that:

  • I'm not immune to the virus (I could very well have it right now) ;
  • me having good chances not to suffer too hard from it doesn't make me immune to spreading it.

 

Yeah, spot on. I definitely felt like I was jumping the gun when I told my boss I was moving to working from home, but I don't think I was, in retrospect. It's the only tool I've got against those two things, and the earlier you deploy it, the better. I don't even have to get it to spread it; it could be on my clothes in a day when my immune system is killing all invaders, and I spread it, and don't contract it myself for another few weeks.

 

It's really hard to wrap our heads around probabilities. It's really hard to think of ourselves as a statistical danger to the wider community. You just gotta figure, every time two people meet, it's a risk roll. We're doing our part for others if we slow down gameplay.

 

Good calls on your thinking. For friends, this is the time to break out video calling and party like you're in a dystopian future. For colleagues, just get the distance you can - 1m to 2m, if possible, no handshaking, sneeze responsibly, don't share food.

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25 minutes ago, sarakingdom said:

It's really hard to wrap our heads around probabilities. It's really hard to think of ourselves as a statistical danger to the wider community. You just gotta figure, every time two people meet, it's a risk roll. We're doing our part for others if we slow down gameplay.

 

Yeah, that and it's really hard to wrap our heads around the fact that we could be carrying the virus even without having been near anybody coughing and not showing any symptom ourselves. I can be infected and I'll only know it in 14 days. Every person I meet in the mean time can be infected and not know it because I show no sign of it and neither do they. They then can meet people themselves and infect them.

 

It's hard to think: I am healthy (though am I really?), I haven't been exposed to the virus that I know of (but I really can't know) but I am an element of risk in the system. Right now, we either are part of the healthcare work force, part of the emergency services, part of a vital part of the economy (food producing and distributing and some others) or a liability.

 

I thought I was above that but I have a lot of "yeah, there's this thing running but look, I'm a good guy doing good things and there's no reason this thing should ever target me plus, look how important what I am doing is, there's no way slowing the spread of this thing could be more important than that!" in my primal thinking. This is the enemy I must fight for the good of the community. I guess I'm not the only one.

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6 hours ago, sarakingdom said:

Everything we do is risk reduction, not risk prevention. This guide to social distancing may be helpful.

 

Thank you. This is a useful way to look at it. I'll try to stop licking strangers. 

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21 minutes ago, Harriet said:

 

Thank you. This is a useful way to look at it. I'll try to stop licking strangers. 

Therapist: And what do we say when we want to lick a stranger?
 

Me: Slurp.

 

Therapist. NO!

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I like this thread. Calm and rational.

 

For people that are not in a high risk group, their job is to minimize spread by practicing common sense practices, and especially staying as healthy as possible because they have to be responsible for the well-being of those who are at a higher risk. And everyone should remember the phrase "There but for the grace of God go I". No matter your risk level, don't engage in risky activities exposing yourself any more than you have to because by some fluke you can be hit hard because of some small medical issue that you may not have considered as leaving you susceptible.

 

As for chili, after the coronavirus runs its course, I am willing to rate samples from anyone willing to make it. Beans or not. Feel free to explain why you think your recipe is correct, but as a guy that loves chili and won't turn it down regardless I'm pretty much going to just nod as I scarf it down. Oh, and if you have a meatloaf recipe you feel stongly about and would like me to sample, please let me know!

 

Stay safe, calm, and fact-focussed everyone. We're all in this together!

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On the subject of chili, does anyone have any thoughts on how many days of food to prep in case of illness? One week, two weeks?

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18 minutes ago, sarakingdom said:

On the subject of chili, does anyone have any thoughts on how many days of food to prep in case of illness? One week, two weeks?

 

I would think that would vary based on the number of people in your household? Since we're assuming that power, gas, and water will not be knocked out by the novel corona pandemic, it seems reasonable to em that in my home, where there are two of us, we don't have a lot to worry about since the risk  of both of us being fully out of commission at the same time, is very low.

 

I don't eat a lot when I'm hungry anyway... I have ice cream and ramen noodles in caes of illness. :) 

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4 hours ago, sarakingdom said:

On the subject of chili, does anyone have any thoughts on how many days of food to prep in case of illness? One week, two weeks?

 

Yes. One week. Mostly chicken soup or your preferred equivalent. See my post here.

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7 hours ago, sarakingdom said:

On the subject of chili, does anyone have any thoughts on how many days of food to prep in case of illness? One week, two weeks?


I have approximately one month’s worth of prepped food in the form of soup bases that we like, including staple favorites like chicken noodle, ham and beans, lentil, and black bean soup. Not necessarily for COVID-19 but because we were trying to prep for theatre season which is now cancelled. 
 

My wife and I have 3 kids, plus 2 dogs, 2 cats, and a bearded dragon.  We always keep a fairly substantial amount of food prepped when we might get sick or when we are both going to be busy, and when we get hit it usually staggers through the family over 3-4 weeks. 
 

Thank you for making this thread. 

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I always have some level of spare and long-term food on hand.  I have multiple food allergies and in an emergency, I would probably not be able to eat anything handed out.  I'm stocked for two weeks on normal stuff now, longer for bulk staples, and have my smallish long term stash as well.  It's mostly only intended to cover a few days for evacuation or a rough power outage at home.

 

Grocery stores are remaining open here, and many farms are offering delivery service on fresh veg and fruit, dairy, and meat.  Dry and canned staples can also be ordered from Amazon in NA at least.  Well.ca in Canada is also shipping grocery staples.  Walmart delivers grocery items in many places.  Check and see what is available locally.  There are also a lot of Facebook mutual aid groups forming and arranging deliveries for those at higher risk of complications. 

 

A number of stores are also restricting the first hour for seniors and those at higher risk so they can shop in relative safety. 

 

 

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6 hours ago, Teirin said:

If you're looking for something you can do to help, there's also the Folding@Home project:  https://foldingathome.org/2020/03/15/coronavirus-what-were-doing-and-how-you-can-help-in-simple-terms/

 

It takes processing and graphics power, and will likely hit your power bill, so please be aware of that. 

 

 

 

I'm doing this myself, as my landlord insists on a flat rate for the bill and the power's going to be paid for one way or the other. :P

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27 minutes ago, sarakingdom said:

Yep, I just read that the WHO is now recommending against ibuprofen. I'll go edit that post.

 

WHO is saying the same as that website last time I checked, but I am fully in favor of a Better Safe Than Sorry approach when it comes to this virus.

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9 minutes ago, Scalyfreak said:

WHO is saying the same as that website last time I checked, but I am fully in favor of a Better Safe Than Sorry approach when it comes to this virus.

 

Agreed. Also, I've never really noticed that painkillers do anything for me. Apart from damaging my stomach, I mean. So, no loss I guess.

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17 minutes ago, Harriet said:

 

Agreed. Also, I've never really noticed that painkillers do anything for me. Apart from damaging my stomach, I mean. So, no loss I guess.

 

In this case, that is only half the benefit. The other half is reducing fever, which does make a huge difference for fighting off a virus. Too high a fever is a bad thing.

 

That said, we're stocking up on Tylenol now. 

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I started posting these links in my own thread, then realized that they'll be seen by more people who are feeling stressed about this Novel Corona thing if I put them in this thread. Basically, the meditation/mindfulness apps Calm and Headspace have remove their paywalls for a portion of their content about how to stay calm and avoid panicking or stressing too much over things we can't control. Links work in any browser, but you should also be able to go through the apps to find this content if you prefer. (Note that I have not tried finding this in the apps myself.)

 

https://www.headspace.com/covid-19 

 

https://www.calm.com/blog/take-a-deep-breath?utm_source=lifecycle&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=difficult_times_subs_031720

 

 

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Thank you for referring me here @sarakingdom it has been an interesting read.

 

I'm guessing most of you are from the states (that is just a wild guess, deducted from your responses here). Well i'm from Europe, living in Belgium (BE) working in the Netherlands (NL) (same goes for my wife), following both insights of handling this. But also soaking up all the information i can get my hands on.

 

Belgium is pretty much lockdown, we are allowed on the streets, but only to perform one of the following:

  • Going to work (but only if you have a job where you are unable to tele-work)
  • Getting groceries
  • Emergency related stuff (very general like pharmacy, hospital, veterinarian etc)
  • Walking running and biking (with a maximum of 1 other with you and minimum distance of 1.5 meter between you and the other)

I just found out the borders are officially closed, again, only crossable with a valid reason. I live right on top of the border with NL. My wife is a nurse, and got papers to get over the border without trouble to go to work. We have to adjust as we usually get our groceries from NL. But i'm looking into delivery though that is getting higher demand as expected.

 

I have locked down my own family since friday, outside a couple of relatives, there has been no visitors, i just left this week to get to work for about 3 hours, and my wife worked her usual 3 days a week. That's it!

 

An absolute fantastic thread made here Sara! I will follow closely, and being right smack in the middle with a lot of information absorbed if any of you have questions don't hesitate to ask. I'm no expert but i have been busy absorbing all information about Corona as much as possible. Next to that my wife works as a nurse in NL part-time on an impromptu ICU-light dept. at the hospital.

 

Next to all this i want to applaud everyone that is taking countermeasures and encourage you to keep on doing that. Do not care what others think about this, this thing is coming for us, and we have to flatten the curve cause it's ruthless!

 

 

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On 3/19/2020 at 3:03 AM, Scalyfreak said:

Too high a fever is a bad thing.

 

Wait, I thought fever was a defensive reaction of the body, trying to prevent the pathogens from replicating correctly (Covid-19 seems to have more trouble spreading with higher temperatures - which is part of the reason, I guess, it goes to the throat and lungs and don't go deeper in the body, unless I'm mistaken, which I could very well be).

 

How high a fever is too high a fever?

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41 minutes ago, Jean said:

 

Wait, I thought fever was a defensive reaction of the body, trying to prevent the pathogens from replicating correctly (Covid-19 seems to have more trouble spreading with higher temperatures - which is part of the reason, I guess, it goes to the throat and lungs and don't go deeper in the body, unless I'm mistaken, which I could very well be).

 

How high a fever is too high a fever?

 

Yes, fever is a defensive reaction against pathogens, but the body will drive it higher or longer than is safe for you if it thinks it needs to. I believe, in essence, your body can give itself heatstroke, which has a lot of permanent injury and death risks.

 

Here's a good discussion of fever.

 

The general guideline is that 106F/41.5C is an incredibly dangerous line to cross under any circumstances. You can start getting seizures, along with other symptoms, and there's a high risk of organ damage, brain damage, and death.

 

103F/39.4C to 104F/40C is considered a high-grade fever. This is where the heat stroke symptoms start kicking in, and it's got the same health risks as the above, if those temperatures last a long time. (COVID-19 does.) Generally, the advice is to start bringing fever down here, so you don't spend a lot of time in this danger zone.

 

What's being reported is that the fever associated with COVID-19 is very high, in that 103-104/39.4-40 range, so you're basically playing the fever control game right away.

 

Many of the deaths associated with COVID-19 seem to me to come from just how aggressive a response it gets from the immune system - it's often your own immune system killing you, not the virus itself. The immune system can and will carry on past the point of organ damage and shutdown, and can also be tricked into mounting an overly aggressive attack on things. (Most autoimmune diseases, for instance, are minor chronic cases of the immune system inappropriately responding to things that aren't really threats and damaging itself in the process.)

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Guys, just so we're prepared, lockdown is probably coming, in the next two weeks if we're on Italy's trajectory, and the rules are different from where we are now. Deliveries probably stop, for one.

 

stayinghome_edit.png

 

https://www.vox.com/future-perfect/2020/3/19/21177527/coronavirus-guide-shelter-at-home-preparedness

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