• Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Tanktimus the Encourager

Angsty: Tanktimus Endures the Uncertainty with Angst Rock

Recommended Posts

Switching to the healthy 30 min meal plan is the best choice, in my opinion. Also, I agree with Sky, Sodium intake is something that should also be monitored.

 

 

Edited by Red1263
adding to the angst list!
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

m not fully convinced sodium is the devil it's made out to be. @Elastigirl has Views on the matter I believe. 

Yes. There are a few people who are sodium sensitive, but they are rare. Too little sodium is also a bad thing ,and can cause problems. Like most things, your body works best with a balance . To me, it sounds like your eating plan is terrific. I've tried super low sodium (down to almost no sodium) in which I still had high blood pressure, plus leg pain, and low energy. Then I went Perfect paleo, where I tried to eat only whole food, and stressed if I ate something off plan. That went about as well as you'd think😉 The things that helped me, 

finding a good balance of food, I eat protein, carbs, and veggies, but like you said I also eat play foods and eat out occasionally. I walk a lot. I read several studies that say getting movement throughout the day helps. So I may go on several short walks , or do a few sessions of short stretches. Add in some weight bearing exercise and some exercise that makes me breathe hard. I also take supplements- Cardiotone (magnesium and calcium) and L-thenine ( green tea extract) I have not checked my BP during this time though. I have been super vigilant about my supplements and walking or other movement

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, EricMN said:

And in one short phrase you have summed up most of my musical tastes, regardless of genre.

 

I have lived this. It was my weight, and my diet. Not only was my lower number about the same as yours, my resting pulse rate was too high to donate blood at least once. I waited until I was older than you are now to do something about it. I'm glad to hear you're taking it seriously (not panic-seriously, but seriously) now. Selfishly I want you to be healthier for a long, long time because I enjoy your friendship, and I plan to become very old. And while I'm an introvert, I enjoy my friendships and will need my friends to mock me about how much older than most of them I am.

Thank you grandpa. Here is your ensure. 

1 minute ago, Red1263 said:

Switching to the healthy 30 min meal plan is the best choice, in my opinion. Also, I agree with Sky, Sodium intake is something that should also be monitored.

I'm not going to bathe in salt, but I'm not going to run from it either. Cutting out processed foods should help immensely.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

Well that was fast. We looked on the service's website and they have a HEALTHY 30 minute meal plan that is quite frankly more interesting than the regular one. We selected that one. I also put in a request for an appointment on the app my Doctors' group uses. I already feel better having done those two things.

 

 

I was diagnosed with hypertension when I was a couple of years younger than you are now. Now, I'm a few years older than you are (I turned 42 right before the pandemic landed on US shores), but I remember how stressful it was to receive that diagnosis. It's very scary. But you're young, and now that you know what you're dealing with, you can deal with it. This is not the end. This is just a firm indication that something needs to change, and you are more than capable of that change. 

 

Making an appointment with your doctor is absolutely the right thing to do. When blood pressure gets to a certain point, the only way to keep it down is through medication, and you should probably expect to try a few different ones before you find the one that works best for your body. Don't let that discourage you, that is normal. Stick with it, and expect it to take a couple of months to calibrate things until you have them smoothed out. Blood pressure is a slow-working long-term condition... that means it takes a while before medication has visible effects. Be patient and keep taking the pills, they will pay off in the end.

 

If you ever want to discuss diet changes and exercise that helps, I'm happy to share what has worked for me. Just say the word, in a post or in a PM. :) 

 

Lastly, I've been listening to music tonight, and this song was playing just as I opened your thread. Obviously that means I'm supposed share it with you, so here you go:

 

Spoiler

 

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Elastigirl said:

Yes. There are a few people who are sodium sensitive, but they are rare. Too little sodium is also a bad thing ,and can cause problems. Like most things, your body works best with a balance . To me, it sounds like your eating plan is terrific. I've tried super low sodium (down to almost no sodium) in which I still had high blood pressure, plus leg pain, and low energy. Then I went Perfect paleo, where I tried to eat only whole food, and stressed if I ate something off plan. That went about as well as you'd think😉 The things that helped me, 

finding a good balance of food, I eat protein, carbs, and veggies, but like you said I also eat play foods and eat out occasionally. I walk a lot. I read several studies that say getting movement throughout the day helps. So I may go on several short walks , or do a few sessions of short stretches. Add in some weight bearing exercise and some exercise that makes me breathe hard. I also take supplements- Cardiotone (magnesium and calcium) and L-thenine ( green tea extract) I have not checked my BP during this time though. I have been super vigilant about my supplements and walking or other movement

Eat clean, lift heavy, where have I heard that before...

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Scalyfreak said:

 

 

I was diagnosed with hypertension when I was a couple of years younger than you are now. Now, I'm a few years older than you are (I turned 42 right before the pandemic landed on US shores), but I remember how stressful it was to receive that diagnosis. It's very scary. But you're young, and now that you know what you're dealing with, you can deal with it. This is not the end. This is just a firm indication that something needs to change, and you are more than capable of that change. 

 

Making an appointment with your doctor is absolutely the right thing to do. When blood pressure gets to a certain point, the only way to keep it down is through medication, and you should probably expect to try a few different ones before you find the one that works best for your body. Don't let that discourage you, that is normal. Stick with it, and expect it to take a couple of months to calibrate things until you have them smoothed out. Blood pressure is a slow-working long-term condition... that means it takes a while before medication has visible effects. Be patient and keep taking the pills, they will pay off in the end.

 

If you ever want to discuss diet changes and exercise that helps, I'm happy to share what has worked for me. Just say the word, in a post or in a PM. :) 

 

Lastly, I've been listening to music tonight, and this song was playing just as I opened your thread. Obviously that means I'm supposed share it with you, so here you go:

 

  Hide contents

 

 

Thank you for that. Please post away right here what helped for you.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

Thank you for that. Please post away right here what helped for you.

 

For one, the medication I am on. Science really does work.

 

Second, I removed as much processed foods from my diet as I possibly could. They have a lot of unnecessary sodium, and a lower amount of nutrients per serving than food that has not been fully or partially processed. I've also almost entirely stopped drinking soda/soft drinks, and I don't bother adding salt when I cook anymore. It took some adjustment, but I don't really miss salt in my cooking anymore. 

 

The thing with sodium is, the average American gets far too much of it. Yes, a sodium deficit is a bad thing. However, I challenge any adult in the US today to develop one by accident. We can't. There is too much of it, everywhere, and now that I am actively avoiding sodium when I can, I am finally not over-eating it anymore. Cooking a lot of my own food helps as well, since that gives me control over what goes into the meal. I have also reduced the amount of eggs and red meat I eat. 

 

I will be on my blood pressure medication for the rest of my life. It runs in the family, and genetic predisposition is one of the biggest factors when it comes to deciding who's blessed with high blood pressure and who is not. Weight is a distant second, but I cannot stress enough that if your doctor fixates on your weight as the sole cause of your high blood pressure, you need to fire them and find another doctor immediately. Weight is one of many factors, but even though my blood pressure went down after I lost some of my excess weight, it was the medication that finally lowered it to a manageable and safe level. 

 

When the blood pressure got to that point, my doctor told me that we can get it lower with medication, but we have to increase the dose to the point the side-effects become a genuine problem. Because of this, it's the established best practice in the medical community to use medication to get the blood pressure 80-85% of the way to the goal, and then use diet and exercise to get it the rest of the way. And that was when I joined this forum. 

 

My last two annual physical wellness checks, I have been given a 100% clean bill of health, including my blood pressure. It's a little bit above ideal, but not so bad there's a need to intervene. In fact, last time I saw him, my doctor told me to keep doing whatever I was doing, since it obviously was working out very well for me. :) 

  • Like 9
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

Well that was fast. We looked on the service's website and they have a HEALTHY 30 minute meal plan that is quite frankly more interesting than the regular one. We selected that one. I also put in a request for an appointment on the app my Doctors' group uses. I already feel better having done those two things.

Good on you and Sra. Tanque for acting fast and decisively. **HUGS** for both of you.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Sloth, things are incredibly stressful in general right now and you've been feeling the effects of this yourself. It's bound to be having an impact on your blood pressure. Of course, the changes your making are generally positive anyway but try not to worry about it too much because I bet in general, the average blood pressure reading for humans the world over has soared a little bit these past few months. 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

One quick-implementation steps that occurs to me is focusing on drinking more water. I'll have a plan for that by the end of zero week.

 

Cheering you on!

 

8 hours ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

I already feel better having done those two things.

 

They actually got a quiet audible "YES!" from me like I was reading an adventure and the hero is doing something I wanted him to do :D (Hello, I am weirdo)

 

Small steps. Sorry to hear it is needed, but rooting for you. 

 

(By the way, I just realised Sra. = an abbreviation for Señora 😅)

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Scalyfreak said:

My last two annual physical wellness checks, I have been given a 100% clean bill of health, including my blood pressure.

Congrats! I misplaced my pompoms again, but I'm snapping as hard as my hands will let me (reference to the Legally Blond snap cup tradition).

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, EricMN said:

Selfishly I want you to be healthier for a long, long time because I enjoy your friendship, and I plan to become very old. And while I'm an introvert, I enjoy my friendships and will need my friends to mock me about how much older than most of them I am.

Same!

Oh, and you need to stick around because @EricMN is one of the few rebels older than I (though only by a smidgen), and watching us heckle each other is going to be a hoot.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stress will absolutely raise your blood pressure. I was put on blood pressure meds when I worked (music) at a crazy fundamentalist church. When I stopped working there 12 years ago, I went off the meds and have been ever since. I have a digital blood pressure cuff that goes on my wrist and I check my pressure frequently. It’s not very accurate but can show trends. Exercise also helps. Some people are salt sensitive but as was stated above, it is rare, about 10% of people.

 You have been through a lot of changes lately. New job, buying a house, first baby, and the Uncertainty on top of it. Stress to the fourth power.

You might need meds for awhile.

 Get a digital bp cuff and monitor yourself. It’s too easy to “cheat” with the analog cuff.

 Try walking meditation?

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Scalyfreak said:

 

For one, the medication I am on. Science really does work.

 

Second, I removed as much processed foods from my diet as I possibly could. They have a lot of unnecessary sodium, and a lower amount of nutrients per serving than food that has not been fully or partially processed. I've also almost entirely stopped drinking soda/soft drinks, and I don't bother adding salt when I cook anymore. It took some adjustment, but I don't really miss salt in my cooking anymore. 

 

The thing with sodium is, the average American gets far too much of it. Yes, a sodium deficit is a bad thing. However, I challenge any adult in the US today to develop one by accident. We can't. There is too much of it, everywhere, and now that I am actively avoiding sodium when I can, I am finally not over-eating it anymore. Cooking a lot of my own food helps as well, since that gives me control over what goes into the meal. I have also reduced the amount of eggs and red meat I eat. 

 

I will be on my blood pressure medication for the rest of my life. It runs in the family, and genetic predisposition is one of the biggest factors when it comes to deciding who's blessed with high blood pressure and who is not. Weight is a distant second, but I cannot stress enough that if your doctor fixates on your weight as the sole cause of your high blood pressure, you need to fire them and find another doctor immediately. Weight is one of many factors, but even though my blood pressure went down after I lost some of my excess weight, it was the medication that finally lowered it to a manageable and safe level. 

 

When the blood pressure got to that point, my doctor told me that we can get it lower with medication, but we have to increase the dose to the point the side-effects become a genuine problem. Because of this, it's the established best practice in the medical community to use medication to get the blood pressure 80-85% of the way to the goal, and then use diet and exercise to get it the rest of the way. And that was when I joined this forum. 

 

My last two annual physical wellness checks, I have been given a 100% clean bill of health, including my blood pressure. It's a little bit above ideal, but not so bad there's a need to intervene. In fact, last time I saw him, my doctor told me to keep doing whatever I was doing, since it obviously was working out very well for me. :) 

Thank you for this, I think it really normalized the idea of BP medication fo rme.

8 hours ago, ElizeElvinFoxRyder said:

Good on you and Sra. Tanque for acting fast and decisively. **HUGS** for both of you.

Thank you.

8 hours ago, deftona said:

I agree with Sloth, things are incredibly stressful in general right now and you've been feeling the effects of this yourself. It's bound to be having an impact on your blood pressure. Of course, the changes your making are generally positive anyway but try not to worry about it too much because I bet in general, the average blood pressure reading for humans the world over has soared a little bit these past few months. 

Probably true.

4 hours ago, analoggirl said:

 

Cheering you on!

 

 

They actually got a quiet audible "YES!" from me like I was reading an adventure and the hero is doing something I wanted him to do :D (Hello, I am weirdo)

 

Small steps. Sorry to hear it is needed, but rooting for you. 

 

(By the way, I just realised Sra. = an abbreviation for Señora 😅)

Every line made me smile independently of the others.

2 hours ago, Heidi said:

Same!

Oh, and you need to stick around because @EricMN is one of the few rebels older than I (though only by a smidgen), and watching us heckle each other is going to be a hoot.

That will be fun. 

 

FWIW the BP is part of an upward trend. It's really only been checked at the Dentist's office this year, but From March till now it's inched up. 

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as we’re giving you our n=1 non-medical professional advice...

BP is very individual, you’re going to have to experiment on yourself, but I’d bet walking and rucking more would do you a world of good. For me, the best thing for my blood pressure is weighted cardio #shovelglovefixeseverything especially KB swings EMOM.

 

Today’s angsts offering.  Kraftwerk’s founder Florian Schneider died yesterday.   Here’s the best I could find for an angsty proto-techno song. 

 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

Thank you for this, I think it really normalized the idea of BP medication for me.

 

You're welcome. I'm glad I could help. :) 

 

One thing I want to add, because I've seen stress mentioned more than once since you shared your news. Yes, it is definitely a factor. Seeing a therapist and learning how to be more mindful and calmer about everything in my life, is absolutely helping me keep my blood pressure at a safe level. However, as with the weight, it is one of several factors, and a doctor who fixates only on your stress levels is one you should question. 

 

Mandatory disclaimer: I am not a doctor or nurse, and I only know specifics about my own case. Double-check all medical info I give out with an actual medical professional.

 

As it was explained to me, there are several factors that contribute to raising my blood pressure:

  • Genetic factors
  • Being overweight
  • High stress levels, either mental or physical
  • Tobacco use
  • Alcohol consumption
  • Diet - bad ones
  • Exercise, or rather, lack of exercise

 

And those are only the most obvious ones that we know about. There could be other factors we haven't discovered or proven yet. In fact, given how science and the human body works, that's probably a given. So looking at that list, any one of those contributing factors raises blood pressure a little bit by itself, but how influential any one of them is, that varies from person to person. To get my blood pressure up to a dangerous level required almost all of them to work together, tobacco was the only one that was not in play. Once I a started managing the variable I could manage, my blood pressure went down, but it did not go down all the way to safe levels just from my efforts. Medication was needed for that, and continues to be needed. This implies that the genetic factors are the most influential ones in my case. In yours, it might be different ones.

 

In your case, the timing of your raised blood pressure does suggest that stress is playing a big part, and it is very likely that lowering your stress levels will also lower your blood pressure. But, to paraphrase my doctor when this came up after he had confirmed the diagnosis and we were discussing treatments, telling me to be less stressed and expect that to be an effective medical treatment, is idiotic both because it doesn't work, and because blaming a patient for their medical condition instead of treating them, is bad medicine in every way. In my case, starting to exercise regularly and to shift towards a healthier diet, were a part of an overall treatment plan, but stress is stress and is what it is. If we could control the things that cause stress in our lives, we wouldn't be stressed in the first place.

 

In the end though, @Sloth the Enduring is right in that almost each blood pressure case is unique to that individual. That's why it took nearly six months for me to get to a point where the treatment was showing lasting results, and if I had not been in close communication with my doctor every step of the way, it might have taken even longer than that. My best advise is an echo of Sloth's - experiment with your own unique variables until you find what works for you. In general, cardio is considered more effective for managing high BP than resistance training is, and consuming a lot of red meat and alcohol is considered a poor choice if you have access to water and chicken or fish, but just like anything else that is health related, it's all about playing the long game and finding an approach you can sustain for the rest of your life.

 

Circling back to the idea of medication: I have come to see it as a normal part of my daily routine, but also as a pure positive. Think about it for a moment... We are live in a world where science has found a way to lower our blood pressure by giving us a small pill to take once every 24 hours. This one tiny little pill has a measurable effect on one of the most fundamental functions of the human body, to an extent that it actually changes my life expectancy and overall health levels. This is actually really cool. Medication like this is miraculous and marvelous, and we are very fortunate that we have access to it.  :) 

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

One quick-implementation steps that occurs to me is focusing on drinking more water. I'll have a plan for that by the end of zero week.

 

This one is so great and so important. Please join me in drink more water land. ☺️ For me, I've found it's extremely effective to snacking less if I drink water any time I think I'm hungry and wait a bit. So often, that "hunger" is actually thirst.

 

I know you're going to do what you need to do for yourself and your health and I'm cheering you on!!!

 

I guess I should contribute some angsty music, huh? A couple selections under the cut.

 

Spoiler

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This has been such a good read!

 

So about sodium - My aunt recently got really dehydrated, drank a lot of water (not sure how much), and passed out and hit her head due to a sodium deficiency. A sodium deficit is a thing that can exist, but you have to have let a lot of things slide to get there. I'm not sure of all your eating habits, @Tanktimus the Encourager, but I know you favor intuitive eating and that you cook. I cook as well! And I notice if something has too much sodium. Pasta sauce in a jar or the wrong frozen burrito will make my stomach very unhappy if there's to much sodium. I try to buy low sodium stocks to cook with (gone are the days when I had time to make them from scratch), but then add my own salt to taste.

 

As others have said, BP is a big parameter space. Stress surely adds to the problem, but also when you're stressed you're more likely to let good habits that mitigated the problem slide. I second everything everyone says here about walking. Walking is magic. Take your meds, for sure, they're super low risk and they work well, but also walk. Our bodies are happier in motion. We remember to drink water. Our stress levels go down. Etc. You just have to remember that, oh, say when there's a pandemic on, things might pile up against these happy little routines.

 

I hope you turn this around! One of my best friends who's an incredible athlete inherited really scary dangerous high BP. Medication works. Cheering for you!

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, DaemonCorax said:

As others have said, BP is a big parameter space. Stress surely adds to the problem, but also when you're stressed you're more likely to let good habits that mitigated the problem slide. 

 

This is an excellent point, and a good reminder that everything is connected and addressing one thing that needs to change often leads to lots of small changes in other parts in life, and  they all add up towards the result.

 

Also good points about sodium and the dangers of not having enough of it. It is a necessary nutrient and our bodies need it. They just don't need nearly as much as I was consuming before I was made aware of it. :) 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Sloth the Enduring said:

As long as we’re giving you our n=1 non-medical professional advice...

BP is very individual, you’re going to have to experiment on yourself, but I’d bet walking and rucking more would do you a world of good. For me, the best thing for my blood pressure is weighted cardio #shovelglovefixeseverything especially KB swings EMOM.

 

Today’s angsts offering.  Kraftwerk’s founder Florian Schneider died yesterday.   Here’s the best I could find for an angsty proto-techno song. 

 

 

Thanks. Yet another song from a group I didn't know. Are you sure you're not some sort of music hipster?

1 hour ago, Scalyfreak said:

 

You're welcome. I'm glad I could help. :) 

 

One thing I want to add, because I've seen stress mentioned more than once since you shared your news. Yes, it is definitely a factor. Seeing a therapist and learning how to be more mindful and calmer about everything in my life, is absolutely helping me keep my blood pressure at a safe level. However, as with the weight, it is one of several factors, and a doctor who fixates only on your stress levels is one you should question. 

 

Mandatory disclaimer: I am not a doctor or nurse, and I only know specifics about my own case. Double-check all medical info I give out with an actual medical professional.

 

As it was explained to me, there are several factors that contribute to raising my blood pressure:

  • Genetic factors
  • Being overweight
  • High stress levels, either mental or physical
  • Tobacco use
  • Alcohol consumption
  • Diet - bad ones
  • Exercise, or rather, lack of exercise

 

And those are only the most obvious ones that we know about. There could be other factors we haven't discovered or proven yet. In fact, given how science and the human body works, that's probably a given. So looking at that list, any one of those contributing factors raises blood pressure a little bit by itself, but how influential any one of them is, that varies from person to person. To get my blood pressure up to a dangerous level required almost all of them to work together, tobacco was the only one that was not in play. Once I a started managing the variable I could manage, my blood pressure went down, but it did not go down all the way to safe levels just from my efforts. Medication was needed for that, and continues to be needed. This implies that the genetic factors are the most influential ones in my case. In yours, it might be different ones.

 

In your case, the timing of your raised blood pressure does suggest that stress is playing a big part, and it is very likely that lowering your stress levels will also lower your blood pressure. But, to paraphrase my doctor when this came up after he had confirmed the diagnosis and we were discussing treatments, telling me to be less stressed and expect that to be an effective medical treatment, is idiotic both because it doesn't work, and because blaming a patient for their medical condition instead of treating them, is bad medicine in every way. In my case, starting to exercise regularly and to shift towards a healthier diet, were a part of an overall treatment plan, but stress is stress and is what it is. If we could control the things that cause stress in our lives, we wouldn't be stressed in the first place.

 

In the end though, @Sloth the Enduring is right in that almost each blood pressure case is unique to that individual. That's why it took nearly six months for me to get to a point where the treatment was showing lasting results, and if I had not been in close communication with my doctor every step of the way, it might have taken even longer than that. My best advise is an echo of Sloth's - experiment with your own unique variables until you find what works for you. In general, cardio is considered more effective for managing high BP than resistance training is, and consuming a lot of red meat and alcohol is considered a poor choice if you have access to water and chicken or fish, but just like anything else that is health related, it's all about playing the long game and finding an approach you can sustain for the rest of your life.

 

Circling back to the idea of medication: I have come to see it as a normal part of my daily routine, but also as a pure positive. Think about it for a moment... We are live in a world where science has found a way to lower our blood pressure by giving us a small pill to take once every 24 hours. This one tiny little pill has a measurable effect on one of the most fundamental functions of the human body, to an extent that it actually changes my life expectancy and overall health levels. This is actually really cool. Medication like this is miraculous and marvelous, and we are very fortunate that we have access to it.  :) 

I think the main thing I'm getting from everyone is there are a lot of reasons for BP to be high. I think I was both seeing it as a character flaw on my part and thinking it was only a symptom of weight (hence the character flaw nonsense). That makes me feel better about the need for medical attention. Everyone's talk about meds makes me feel better about taking them if needed.

1 hour ago, starsapart said:

 

This one is so great and so important. Please join me in drink more water land. ☺️ For me, I've found it's extremely effective to snacking less if I drink water any time I think I'm hungry and wait a bit. So often, that "hunger" is actually thirst.

 

I know you're going to do what you need to do for yourself and your health and I'm cheering you on!!!

 

I guess I should contribute some angsty music, huh? A couple selections under the cut.

 

  Hide contents

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for the support and the tunes. I have been drinking water from a nalgene bottle that lets me track what I drink.

15 minutes ago, DaemonCorax said:

This has been such a good read!

 

So about sodium - My aunt recently got really dehydrated, drank a lot of water (not sure how much), and passed out and hit her head due to a sodium deficiency. A sodium deficit is a thing that can exist, but you have to have let a lot of things slide to get there. I'm not sure of all your eating habits, @Tanktimus the Encourager, but I know you favor intuitive eating and that you cook. I cook as well! And I notice if something has too much sodium. Pasta sauce in a jar or the wrong frozen burrito will make my stomach very unhappy if there's to much sodium. I try to buy low sodium stocks to cook with (gone are the days when I had time to make them from scratch), but then add my own salt to taste.

 

As others have said, BP is a big parameter space. Stress surely adds to the problem, but also when you're stressed you're more likely to let good habits that mitigated the problem slide. I second everything everyone says here about walking. Walking is magic. Take your meds, for sure, they're super low risk and they work well, but also walk. Our bodies are happier in motion. We remember to drink water. Our stress levels go down. Etc. You just have to remember that, oh, say when there's a pandemic on, things might pile up against these happy little routines.

 

I hope you turn this around! One of my best friends who's an incredible athlete inherited really scary dangerous high BP. Medication works. Cheering for you!

I seriously doubt I'm in danger of sodium deficiency. I do plan to keep working out and drinking water in addition to drinking well. 

3 minutes ago, Scalyfreak said:

 

This is an excellent point, and a good reminder that everything is connected and addressing one thing that needs to change often leads to lots of small changes in other parts in life, and  they all add up towards the result.

 

Also good points about sodium and the dangers of not having enough of it. It is a necessary nutrient and our bodies need it. They just don't need nearly as much as I was consuming before I was made aware of it. :) 

I don't know what my sodium intake is, but I'm willing to bet it's high rather than low.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

I think the main thing I'm getting from everyone is there are a lot of reasons for BP to be high. I think I was both seeing it as a character flaw on my part and thinking it was only a symptom of weight (hence the character flaw nonsense). 

 

Absolutely not. And if the doctor goes in that direction with their diagnosis, dump them immediately. Not only is that highly unprofessional, fixating on one contributing factor and ignoring the others is not a good way to ether diagnose or treat a medical condition.

 

In my case, losing weight helped and it is acknowledged by the medical community as a contributing factor, but now that I lost the weight and am considerably more fit, I still need the medication to remain healthy. If I forget to take the pill before someone like my dentist or optometrist takes my blood pressure for a checkup, they can tell immediately because the lower of the two numbers goes back up to where it would be permanently lodged if not for the magical pills.

 

3 hours ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

 

I don't know what my sodium intake is, but I'm willing to bet it's high rather than low.

 

I don't know what mine is either. I pay attention to nutrition labels, and the % Daily Value number, and if it says that a specific thing has over 50% of recommended daily sodium intake, I try to avoid it. (Unless its potato chips, which is why I try not to buy them very often.) It was a bit of a shock to me just how much sodium there is in processed foods, when I started paying attention. My doctor told me that over-consuming sodium elevates blood pressure, so when I started making changes to my diet and try and eat healthier foods, that was one of the changes I made. My blood pressure is at a safer level now, and I have learned that I don't feel good when I eat lots of food with lots of sodium in it, so it's easy to avoid. And since my doctor insists on seeing me for regular check-ups which include sending blood samples to a lab to check for all the things they check for, I trust that he will tell me if I start being deficient.

 

In blood values!

 

Deficiencies in nutrition.

 

You know what I mean.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Scalyfreak said:

It was a bit of a shock to me

 

Mmm The Empire knows how much the people love sugar, salt and flowery (doughy) goodness.

 

Three hurrahs for the Rebellion!  ( :D )

  • Like 1
  • That's Metal 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

I had a dental appointment for a filling. I went to the appointment. I did not get the filling. My blood pressure was too high. The bottom number was over 100 on several reads, and they deemed it unsafe to do the filling. The dentist was really cool about it and very supportive. The fillings are minor enough the Dentist did not decide to schedule a follow up, they'll just check them out on the xrays at my next cleaning. We nerded out about the app for taking pictures of my teeth for the invisalign, and she said I picked a very good orthodontist. She did encourage me to see a doctor about the blood pressure, but didn't rush me out the door to the emergency room or anything.

 

This is a big deal. Just writing about it is making me feel a little anxious. I'm not noticing it much in how I feel emotionally, but I am getting signals from my body (a slight tight sensation in the chest, slightly lightheaded, weirdness in my arms) that tell me this is bothering me more than my conscious mind wants to admit. I'm sure this is about weight, and probably some portion is from getting older (I turn 39 this summer). I refuse to do the thing where I don't go to the doctor and not think about it, and even so setting up an appointment is going to take some willpower. Fortunately I can ask for an appointment via an app my group uses, so at least there isn't a phone call emotional barrier to scheduling an appointment. 

 

Sra. Tanque and I discussed the issue some, and will some more later tonight. One of the things we talked about was how to eat healthier and still do intuitive eating. We both agreed and liked the idea that we aren't going to restrict anything, just focus more on healthy stuff. We aren't going to get less restaurant food, we are going to cook more at home. We aren't going to eliminate processed food, we are going to add more whole/clean/real food. We also aren't going to get rid of candy or ice cream (what IE calls "Play food"). It will be there, and we can still have what we want. I know for me, that knowledge and assurance has actually helped me eat less of it. One of the strategies we talked about was switching meal plans on the service we use for getting a weekly email of menus and shopping lists with recipes. We aren't going to go with the restrictive plans (no Keto or low carb) but will look at the healthy plans. We have been using the 30 minute meal plan because it required less willpower to make those meals. The tradeoff is that calls for a lot of processed food.

 

One quick-implementation steps that occurs to me is focusing on drinking more water. I'll have a plan for that by the end of zero week.

 

Many people have already given you a lot of good thoughts and advice, but I'm glad you have already started working to help improve this and than Sra. Tanque is supportive! Also nice the healthy 30 min option is available.🤗

 

20 hours ago, Sloth the Enduring said:

I love your attitude towards your new food plan and that Sra is so supportive. I can’t help but think that the stress that we’re all under is a factor. Honestly, I’ve been afraid to check mine; I am that guy.

I can imagine this is contributing

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have nothing to contribute to the BP discussion, although I’m taking notes for the future and I’m cheering you on Tank. 
 

side note: I have never had my BP taken for any dental procedure, except maybe when they knocked me out for my wisdom teeth. Does your dentist always check you before fillings, or did something else prompt this? 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Sloth the Enduring said:

 

Today’s angsts offering.  Kraftwerk’s founder Florian Schneider died yesterday.   Here’s the best I could find for an angsty proto-techno song. 

 

 

Man this news made yesterday a little darker, NGL.

 

1 hour ago, fleaball said:

side note: I have never had my BP taken for any dental procedure, except maybe when they knocked me out for my wisdom teeth. Does your dentist always check you before fillings, or did something else prompt this? 

 

I never have either, and I'm interested to know if this is regular protocol?

 

Either way I'm glad you worked through it and made the smart decision to reach out to your doctor. ❤️ 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.