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KB Girl

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No reason to let a little PPD keep me from chopping away at my goals, right? I'm going to try to appreciate every little chop. 

 

Goal 1: rebuild the engine

Heavy lifting and rehab work has my priority, but I want to slowly build up my tolerance for cardio. 

Row an average of 500 meters a day, 5x7x500= 17500 total, plus zero week.. I'll round that up to 20.000! 

I will also count longer (6:00+) snatch sets, where every kg moved is a meter. 

 

Goal 2: write words

Anything goes.... I just really need to practice both taking the time for it and stomping up and down on perfectionist thoughts. 

Hmmm... an average of 100 words a day? Sounds extremely doable right? 5x7x100= 3500 words. 

 

Goal 3: go outside

Trees are good for my mental health.. and I think with kids every minute spend outside is good for them..

I'm not going to keep track of this in minutes or anything like that, but I'll report on it here. 

 

2052569436_WhatsAppImage2020-09-09at00_10_37.thumb.jpeg.6598affc79dbd1c1cc528261db1d965f.jpeg\

Ofcourse I made a fancy tracker in my bujo. It has waaaay to many squares, but I can just continue on after this challenge. I could have picked something with the appropriate amount of pixels.... but then I saw these Zelda pieces and how could I resist? 

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Main Quest: becoming a decent kettlebell lifter and a great coach

Current challenge: KB Girl prepares for the new year

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Might as well report straight away. Going to go with the list of positive things + maybe a bit of journaling here and there. 

 

Tuesday

  • made pulled pork for dinner
  • went on a long walk in the woods with Jaap and the kids
  • finally weighed in under 83kg
  • had a pretty productive work day 
  • morning training;
    - bunch of single leg rehabbity things
    - deadlifts 3x55kg, 3x60kg, 3x65kg, 3x3x70kg -> finally let myself up the weight a bit, still wasn't really heavy and no pelvic floor issues
    - ass. ring pullups 4x3 
  • evening training; 
    - 10:00 snatch with 8kg 
    - 650 meter row

A pretty energetic day despite not sleeping great- checked and according to my calendar I'm right around my ovulation, so that fits. 

Since we're on the topic, anyone here got any experience with or thoughts on copper IUD? 

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  • That's Metal 1

Main Quest: becoming a decent kettlebell lifter and a great coach

Current challenge: KB Girl prepares for the new year

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Following along. Believe it or not, I have no firsthand experience of IUDs.

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Current Challenge Original 1,2,3, R 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40,41,42,43,44,45,46,47,48,49,50,51

"By the Most-Righteous-and-Blessed Beard of Sir Tanktimus the Encourager!" - Jarl Rurik Harrgath

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18 minutes ago, KB Girl said:

Since we're on the topic, anyone here got any experience with or thoughts on copper IUD? 

 

Yes, and yes. What do you want to know?

 

I've had copper IUDs for a couple of decades, and refuse to ever use another form of birth control.  I am happy to answer questions to the best of my ability, and to share my (biased!) thoughts. PMs or public, I do not care either way. :) 

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“I've always believed that failure is non-existent. What is failure? You go to the end of the season, then you lose the Super Bowl. Is that failing? To most people, maybe. But when you're picking apart why you failed, and now you're learning from that, then is that really failing? I don't think so." - Kobe Bryant, 1978-2020. Rest in peace, great warrior.

Personal Challenges, a.k.a.The Saga of Scaly Freak: Tutorial; Ch 1; Ch 2; Ch 3; Ch 4; Ch 5; Ch 6; Intermission; Intermission II; Ch 7; Ch 8; Ch 9; Ch 10; Ch 11; Ch 12 ; Ch 13; Ch 14Ch 15; Ch 16; Ch 17; Intermission IIICh 18; Ch 19; Ch 20; Ch 21; Ch 22; Ch 23; Ch 24; Ch 25; Intermission IV; Ch 26

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2 minutes ago, Scaly Freak said:

 

Yes, and yes. What do you want to know?

 

I've had copper IUDs for a couple of decades, and refuse to ever use another form of birth control.  I am happy to answer questions to the best of my ability, and to share my (biased!) thoughts. PMs or public, I do not care either way. :) 

Oh excellent! ehm ehm. 

I'm almost convinced to get one.. but I'm a little worried / anxious* about copper building up in there... I'm not worried so much about my own health but what if we ever do decide we would like to try for a third child? unlikely, but I'd like to keep the option open. Not a concern of yours I think, but maybe you have thoughts anyway? 

And if I do go for it, would there be an ideal time in your cycle to place it? How long have yours lasted? Did your period pain get worse for a bit? How is that over the long term? 

*I'm thinking this is unrealistic/unfounded, but there is this voice in my head that keeps nagging at me about how under researched a lot of women's health issues are. 

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Main Quest: becoming a decent kettlebell lifter and a great coach

Current challenge: KB Girl prepares for the new year

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I meant to reply tonight, but so much of our kitchen things were stored in the garage and needed cleaning, and then there was the playoff game, and there was a need for showering, and then there was my stupid early meeting tomorrow morning and... 

 

I promise to reply and answer each question honestly, but if I do it tonight, it will be half-assed, and honest IUD questions deserve better than half-assed. I will give honest non-half-assed answers tomorrow. Warrior's honor.

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“I've always believed that failure is non-existent. What is failure? You go to the end of the season, then you lose the Super Bowl. Is that failing? To most people, maybe. But when you're picking apart why you failed, and now you're learning from that, then is that really failing? I don't think so." - Kobe Bryant, 1978-2020. Rest in peace, great warrior.

Personal Challenges, a.k.a.The Saga of Scaly Freak: Tutorial; Ch 1; Ch 2; Ch 3; Ch 4; Ch 5; Ch 6; Intermission; Intermission II; Ch 7; Ch 8; Ch 9; Ch 10; Ch 11; Ch 12 ; Ch 13; Ch 14Ch 15; Ch 16; Ch 17; Intermission IIICh 18; Ch 19; Ch 20; Ch 21; Ch 22; Ch 23; Ch 24; Ch 25; Intermission IV; Ch 26

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10 hours ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

Following along. Believe it or not, I have no firsthand experience of IUDs.

Wouldn’t your wife’s experiences still be firsthand? Or is that second hand already? 
 

5 hours ago, Scaly Freak said:

I meant to reply tonight, but so much of our kitchen things were stored in the garage and needed cleaning, and then there was the playoff game, and there was a need for showering, and then there was my stupid early meeting tomorrow morning and... 

 

I promise to reply and answer each question honestly, but if I do it tonight, it will be half-assed, and honest IUD questions deserve better than half-assed. I will give honest non-half-assed answers tomorrow. Warrior's honor.

no worries! The questions will keep :) 

 

4 hours ago, Harriet said:

Yes! Lifting and journaling and nature! You will do well, I can feel it in my left ventromedial lobe. 

Lovely :D 

Main Quest: becoming a decent kettlebell lifter and a great coach

Current challenge: KB Girl prepares for the new year

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4 hours ago, KB Girl said:

Wouldn’t your wife’s experiences still be firsthand? Or is that second hand already? 
 

If I tell you about her experiences it would be secondhand. If I told you about her experiences and you in turn told someone else it would be thirdhand information, though thirdhand is seldom used in conversation.  Also, she's never had an IUD, so I don't even have second hand info.

Current Challenge Original 1,2,3, R 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40,41,42,43,44,45,46,47,48,49,50,51

"By the Most-Righteous-and-Blessed Beard of Sir Tanktimus the Encourager!" - Jarl Rurik Harrgath

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17 minutes ago, Tanktimus the Encourager said:

If I tell you about her experiences it would be secondhand. If I told you about her experiences and you in turn told someone else it would be thirdhand information, though thirdhand is seldom used in conversation.  Also, she's never had an IUD, so I don't even have second hand info.

Ah but if you told me about your experiences with her birth control (or lack thereof) wouldn’t that be first hand? I think Jaap would have his own pov on my birth control 😅

Main Quest: becoming a decent kettlebell lifter and a great coach

Current challenge: KB Girl prepares for the new year

my instagram - my gym's instagram

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I love your tracker :). You're really one of those super-moms again who not only care for their children and have a respectable house, but also works, looks out for your health and do other "good for you"-things :D.

 

On the IUD-part, I only have experience with the Mirena, no copper since my "natural" period is very heavy already. 

 

Good luck with the challenge!

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1 hour ago, KB Girl said:

Ah but if you told me about your experiences with her birth control (or lack thereof) wouldn’t that be first hand? I think Jaap would have his own pov on my birth control 😅

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I have many friends with IUDs, with extremely varying experiences. I wound up going with the arm implant instead for a lot of reasons, mostly because I had some friends with very bad IUD experiences and I was hopeful the implant would stop my period -- which it did for the first 5 years, but it unfortunately has come back. 🙄However, I have friends who have ALSO had very different experiences with THIS method (arm implant) of birth control. The way different people's bodies react differently to these options is nothing short of astonishing sometimes. 

Raptron, alot assassin

6564636261605958 575655545352515049484746454443424140393837363534333231302928272625242322212019181716151413121110987 | 6 | 5 | 4 | 3 | 2 | 1

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5 hours ago, Waanie said:

I love your tracker :). You're really one of those super-moms again who not only care for their children and have a respectable house, but also works, looks out for your health and do other "good for you"-things :D.

 

On the IUD-part, I only have experience with the Mirena, no copper since my "natural" period is very heavy already. 

 

Good luck with the challenge!

Respectable house? Hehehehe. Hehe. But I’ll take some praising for the other bits, even if I fail there often enough, thank you :) 

 

I had the mirena before babies, but I just don’t do well with hormones (my own or artificial ones, hehe).

 

3 hours ago, raptron said:

I have many friends with IUDs, with extremely varying experiences. I wound up going with the arm implant instead for a lot of reasons, mostly because I had some friends with very bad IUD experiences and I was hopeful the implant would stop my period -- which it did for the first 5 years, but it unfortunately has come back. 🙄However, I have friends who have ALSO had very different experiences with THIS method (arm implant) of birth control. The way different people's bodies react differently to these options is nothing short of astonishing sometimes. 

it really is!

did your period come back because the implant is older? Or just because your body got used to it or something? 
 

2 hours ago, Mad Hatter said:

Cute tracker!

 

Truth. The only way to know is really to try it out and hope for the best. 😕 

Thanks! 
That face says it all really. I do not like the hoping for the best part.

Main Quest: becoming a decent kettlebell lifter and a great coach

Current challenge: KB Girl prepares for the new year

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Wednesday

 

A big bummer, woke up sneezing and ended up with a headache and feverish feeling by the end of the day. Not an easy day to get through, but;

- put away a load of laundry

- vacuumed

- enjoyed yesterday’s pulled pork

- ehhh... sort of managing my negative hopeless thoughts? 
 

I really like Wednesday evenings at the gym, so I was sad I couldn’t go.. but one of our members opened up and ran things for a while so Jaap could help me get the kids in bed. Two kids at bed time is hard enough when you’re not sick. I’m grateful for all the good people around us. 

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Main Quest: becoming a decent kettlebell lifter and a great coach

Current challenge: KB Girl prepares for the new year

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On 9/8/2020 at 4:57 PM, KB Girl said:

Oh excellent! ehm ehm. 

 

 

Okay, let's start with the mandatory disclaimer that I am  not a medical professional, so nothing I say should be taken as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, and so on. 

 

Second, I put your questions and my answers in a spoiler, because it's a big wall of text.

 

 

Spoiler

 

I'm almost convinced to get one.. but I'm a little worried / anxious* about copper building up in there... 

 

This is the part where I admit that I initially ended up with a copper IUD almost by default. I had a very specific idea of what I was looking for in my birth control, and the copper IUD met my criteria.

 

There is a plethora of cardio vascular diseases, rampant high blood pressure, and small number of strokes in my family's medical history, so I was looking for a way to avoid worsening my already poor health odds by using a non-hormonal form of birth control. I also knew that I wanted something that was low maintenance and that was super-effective at preventing pregnancy.

 

When I looked that my criteria, all of which were deal breakers in my mind, the copper IUD met all three of them:

 

No hormones? Absolutely, because copper is obviously not a hormone.

Low maintenance? Well, it takes one OBGYN visit to set me up for a decade, so that's also a yes.

Effective against pregnancy? Yes, by 99.9%.

 

All that aside, there have been studies on the effects of putting a copper object into a uterus for a decade, but none of them show hat this leads to toxic effects to the body the uterus belongs to, unless there is another significant factor in play. An allergy to copper would obviously make a copper IUD a bad choice, for example. From the research I did back then, and spent some time rechecking this afternoon, the copper IUD is like other forms of birth control, or really, any medical treatment: There will always be horror stories about them out there, but those stories don't change the fact that they are completely safe for the majority of users, and the number of success stories you never hear about is exponentially higher.


I'm not worried so much about my own health but what if we ever do decide we would like to try for a third child? unlikely, but I'd like to keep the option open. Not a concern of yours I think, but maybe you have thoughts anyway? 

 

It was actually a concern for me when I got my first copper IUD, at a time in my life when my position on having children was "I might want them later", so I wanted something that would keep all my options open. The copper IUD is instant reversal when it's removed, so if you decide you want another child, there's no waiting period to plan around, like you would need to do with hormonal birth control, and no lingering long-term effects from anti-pregnancy hormones to worry about if you become pregnant very soon after removing it.


And if I do go for it, would there be an ideal time in your cycle to place it?

 

My suggestion is to try to get it done right after your period, so you have as many days as possible for it to get settled, before your cervix opens again. The IUD is a small but solid object that is inserted into the uterus, and once it's in there, it takes a while before the IUD, gravity, and the way you move as you go about your life, learn to work together to figure out exactly where the IUD is going to sit for the next few years. Give it time to fully settle before the cervix opens to release your next period, and you'll be more comfortable and have a lot more peace of mind about the IUD staying put.

 

(Yes, they sometimes move, and one of the things your OBGYN will go over with you when they insert your first IUD is how and how often you should check where the long copper strings are and use them to verify the IUD is where it's supposed to be. This is one of those basic maintenance things that actually gives more peace of mind, because doing these regular checks will allow you to notice if something is wrong long before it becomes an actual problem, just like those monthly breast exams we're supposed to do.)

 

How long have yours lasted?

My first copper IUD was guaranteed for a decade. The one I have right now is guaranteed for 12 years.

 

Did your period pain get worse for a bit? How is that over the long term? 

 

I'm not the best person to ask about this, because for as long as I can remember, my period pain has been overwhelming to the point I eat pain killers like candy for at least two or three days per cycle.

 

That said, while I have not tracked it, it does not seem to me that my period pains have become worse through the years. I know that the most common side-effects of a copper IUD are heavier and more painful periods, but since I already had those, I didn't really worry too much about that before getting my first one. In fact, I remember being mildly surprised and telling a friend, "I thought this was supposed to get worse?"

 

That said, the insertion process itself is not pleasant. Obviously nothing close to the pain of giving birth, but the cervix does not like to be opened, whether that is done by inside forces or outside ones. Mine expressed its fury at the indignities my OBGYN put it through by hurting for the next 4-5 days. I also had some minor bleeding right after, which is normal, and not a concern unless it gets worse or does not stop within a week When it was time to remove my first IUD and replace it, I took an ibuprofen an hour before the appointment and that definitely helped.

 

Most importantly when it comes the insertion process though: No, it's not pleasant, but it is not supposed to be outright painful or frightening. I was unlucky in that it took me five attempts before I found an OBGYN with gentle hands and patience, but now that I know what was missing from the first four, they can go down in battery acid for all I care. 

 

You should probably also expect your first period after insertion to be a bit heavier than normal, but should settle back down shortly after that as the uterus gets used to having the IUD in there.

 

I hardly ever think about mine, which is how I like it. :) 

 

 

We (=everyone!)  don't talk enough birth control methods. How they work, how they feel, how they impact our lives, and how we live with them, and everything else. They are high up on the list of a lot of things that I wish it was considered more normal to talk openly about. :) 

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“I've always believed that failure is non-existent. What is failure? You go to the end of the season, then you lose the Super Bowl. Is that failing? To most people, maybe. But when you're picking apart why you failed, and now you're learning from that, then is that really failing? I don't think so." - Kobe Bryant, 1978-2020. Rest in peace, great warrior.

Personal Challenges, a.k.a.The Saga of Scaly Freak: Tutorial; Ch 1; Ch 2; Ch 3; Ch 4; Ch 5; Ch 6; Intermission; Intermission II; Ch 7; Ch 8; Ch 9; Ch 10; Ch 11; Ch 12 ; Ch 13; Ch 14Ch 15; Ch 16; Ch 17; Intermission IIICh 18; Ch 19; Ch 20; Ch 21; Ch 22; Ch 23; Ch 24; Ch 25; Intermission IV; Ch 26

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16 hours ago, Scaly Freak said:

We (=everyone!)  don't talk enough birth control methods. How they work, how they feel, how they impact our lives, and how we live with them, and everything else. They are high up on the list of a lot of things that I wish it was considered more normal to talk openly about. :) 

Agreed! Although I think it's quite common for my generation to talk about it with other women. Even at work it's not taboo anymore apparently ;). Anyway, thanks for the information :). I'm not switching to copper because a heavy flow was the reason why I started BC anyway, but I understand why you would choose it:).

 

Just a quick note: it's very likely that your GP (huisarts) would place the IUD. You can also discuss your options with them, since they probably know more about BC than random people on the internet. They can also tell you when you have to take the STD test and what time in your cycle you should get it put in.

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On 9/9/2020 at 11:33 PM, Elastigirl said:

Yay for getting stuff done. Hope the illness is short lived.

Thanks! It seems to be improving already :) 

 

On 9/10/2020 at 2:51 AM, Scaly Freak said:

 

Okay, let's start with the mandatory disclaimer that I am  not a medical professional, so nothing I say should be taken as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, and so on. Second, I put your questions and my answers in a spoiler, because it's a big wall of text.

  Reveal hidden contents

 

I'm almost convinced to get one.. but I'm a little worried / anxious* about copper building up in there... 

 

This is the part where I admit that I initially ended up with a copper IUD almost by default. I had a very specific idea of what I was looking for in my birth control, and the copper IUD met my criteria.

 

There is a plethora of cardio vascular diseases, rampant high blood pressure, and small number of strokes in my family's medical history, so I was looking for a way to avoid worsening my already poor health odds by using a non-hormonal form of birth control. I also knew that I wanted something that was low maintenance and that was super-effective at preventing pregnancy.

 

When I looked that my criteria, all of which were deal breakers in my mind, the copper IUD met all three of them:

 

No hormones? Absolutely, because copper is obviously not a hormone.

Low maintenance? Well, it takes one OBGYN visit to set me up for a decade, so that's also a yes.

Effective against pregnancy? Yes, by 99.9%.

 

All that aside, there have been studies on the effects of putting a copper object into a uterus for a decade, but none of them show hat this leads to toxic effects to the body the uterus belongs to, unless there is another significant factor in play. An allergy to copper would obviously make a copper IUD a bad choice, for example. From the research I did back then, and spent some time rechecking this afternoon, the copper IUD is like other forms of birth control, or really, any medical treatment: There will always be horror stories about them out there, but those stories don't change the fact that they are completely safe for the majority of users, and the number of success stories you never hear about is exponentially higher.


I'm not worried so much about my own health but what if we ever do decide we would like to try for a third child? unlikely, but I'd like to keep the option open. Not a concern of yours I think, but maybe you have thoughts anyway? 

 

It was actually a concern for me when I got my first copper IUD, at a time in my life when my position on having children was "I might want them later", so I wanted something that would keep all my options open. The copper IUD is instant reversal when it's removed, so if you decide you want another child, there's no waiting period to plan around, like you would need to do with hormonal birth control, and no lingering long-term effects from anti-pregnancy hormones to worry about if you become pregnant very soon after removing it.


And if I do go for it, would there be an ideal time in your cycle to place it?

 

My suggestion is to try to get it done right after your period, so you have as many days as possible for it to get settled, before your cervix opens again. The IUD is a small but solid object that is inserted into the uterus, and once it's in there, it takes a while before the IUD, gravity, and the way you move as you go about your life, learn to work together to figure out exactly where the IUD is going to sit for the next few years. Give it time to fully settle before the cervix opens to release your next period, and you'll be more comfortable and have a lot more peace of mind about the IUD staying put.

 

(Yes, they sometimes move, and one of the things your OBGYN will go over with you when they insert your first IUD is how and how often you should check where the long copper strings are and use them to verify the IUD is where it's supposed to be. This is one of those basic maintenance things that actually gives more peace of mind, because doing these regular checks will allow you to notice if something is wrong long before it becomes an actual problem, just like those monthly breast exams we're supposed to do.)

 

How long have yours lasted?

My first copper IUD was guaranteed for a decade. The one I have right now is guaranteed for 12 years.

 

Did your period pain get worse for a bit? How is that over the long term? 

 

I'm not the best person to ask about this, because for as long as I can remember, my period pain has been overwhelming to the point I eat pain killers like candy for at least two or three days per cycle.

 

That said, while I have not tracked it, it does not seem to me that my period pains have become worse through the years. I know that the most common side-effects of a copper IUD are heavier and more painful periods, but since I already had those, I didn't really worry too much about that before getting my first one. In fact, I remember being mildly surprised and telling a friend, "I thought this was supposed to get worse?"

 

That said, the insertion process itself is not pleasant. Obviously nothing close to the pain of giving birth, but the cervix does not like to be opened, whether that is done by inside forces or outside ones. Mine expressed its fury at the indignities my OBGYN put it through by hurting for the next 4-5 days. I also had some minor bleeding right after, which is normal, and not a concern unless it gets worse or does not stop within a week When it was time to remove my first IUD and replace it, I took an ibuprofen an hour before the appointment and that definitely helped.

 

Most importantly when it comes the insertion process though: No, it's not pleasant, but it is not supposed to be outright painful or frightening. I was unlucky in that it took me five attempts before I found an OBGYN with gentle hands and patience, but now that I know what was missing from the first four, they can go down in battery acid for all I care. 

 

You should probably also expect your first period after insertion to be a bit heavier than normal, but should settle back down shortly after that as the uterus gets used to having the IUD in there.

 

I hardly ever think about mine, which is how I like it. :) 

 

 

We (=everyone!)  don't talk enough birth control methods. How they work, how they feel, how they impact our lives, and how we live with them, and everything else. They are high up on the list of a lot of things that I wish it was considered more normal to talk openly about. :) 

And so on :D

Thanks a lot! I really appreciate you taking the time! And I agree, it'd be easier if it was a more often talked about subject, that's also why I chose not to DM, maybe it'll be useful for someone else too. I've been reading up of course, but it's just.... comforting/reassuring to hear from someone who has one. I think that's the last thing I needed, I think I'm pretty much ready to make an appointment. 

 

14 hours ago, Waanie said:

Agreed! Although I think it's quite common for my generation to talk about it with other women. Even at work it's not taboo anymore apparently ;). Anyway, thanks for the information :). I'm not switching to copper because a heavy flow was the reason why I started BC anyway, but I understand why you would choose it:).

 

Just a quick note: it's very likely that your GP (huisarts) would place the IUD. You can also discuss your options with them, since they probably know more about BC than random people on the internet. They can also tell you when you have to take the STD test and what time in your cycle you should get it put in.

I think the Netherlands might be a bit different when it comes to taboos? 

My GP did place my mirena when I had that, but discussing worries you know are probably a bit silly with your GP? No thanks. I think I really just needed to hear from someone who actually has one (I don't know anyone IRL) and Scary isn't really a random person, I know her at least well enough to appreciate her intelligence and way of thinking about things :)

This time I'd get it placed by my midwife btw, I'd much prefer having her between my legs than my GP :D

 

Thursday

Not much to say here, spend pretty much the entire day either napping or caring for children x) 
I made a shepherds pie with the last pulled pork, it was really good. 

Emma learned how to ride a bike :)

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Main Quest: becoming a decent kettlebell lifter and a great coach

Current challenge: KB Girl prepares for the new year

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2 hours ago, Mad Hatter said:

What I wish even more than people talking about birth control is that more research would be made. You'd kinda think that in the 60 years pills have been around choosing birth control would involve less trial and error. Fingers crossed it will work well for you.

 

Congrats to Emma. :) 

Well yes! That’s exactly what makes me worry and doubtful. Try telling that to your GP though. What sort of comforts me is that copper is a lot more straightforward than hormones are. Also makes it easier to research. But also, how do you even tell it works well? Especially with the hormonal stuff. 

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Main Quest: becoming a decent kettlebell lifter and a great coach

Current challenge: KB Girl prepares for the new year

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2 hours ago, KB Girl said:

But also, how do you even tell it works well? Especially with the hormonal stuff. 

This is something that has been bothering me too lately. Spoilering to not hijack the thread.

 

Spoiler

I'm coming to the end of my second Mirena, but what does it even mean? They guarantee it for five years, but what happens after that? What's the hormonal drop off rate? I'm somewhat considering getting off of birth control for a while as an experiment, since 1) I don't have a steady partner and 2) it's been bothering me a lot that it completely masks what's going on in my body. I haven't had a real period in an a decade and I LOVE that, which is really the main reason for me to keep it. But what if it does affect me negatively and I'm not aware of it? It's been a long time to mess with hormones. And now that I'm really getting old maybe it's better to keep closer track as hormones will naturally change? I don't know. To bring it back to the original point, it bugs me that I don't know how it works towards its supposed end date (which seems to be bogus anyway and it actually lasts for a lot longer than 5 years) and if I were to remove wouldn't it'd be better to have it in for longer to make the process more gradual?

 

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9 hours ago, KB Girl said:

I think the Netherlands might be a bit different when it comes to taboos? 

My GP did place my mirena when I had that, but discussing worries you know are probably a bit silly with your GP? No thanks. I think I really just needed to hear from someone who actually has one (I don't know anyone IRL) and Scary isn't really a random person, I know her at least well enough to appreciate her intelligence and way of thinking about things :)

 

Thank you, I'm taking that as a big compliment. :) (And I'm refraining from correcting the misspelling of my name, because that's a compliment too. ;) )

 

And I'm currently in a conservative part of the USA (one of the "red states"), so anything related to reproductive health in women is "icky" and no one wants to acknowledge it, let alone educate girls on it. People in general seem to be a lot more comfortable discussing cancer with someone who has it, than talking about birth control, or educating teens or adults about it.

 

Also, the process for getting an IUD inserted can be ridiculously complicated, since it's not a given that a GP or nurse practitioner can insert it for you. On that note, I highly recommend having it done by someone who does the process a lot, since they will have more practice in making it as comfortable for you as possible without dragging it out longer than necessary. This goes triple more for removing one, since the uterus works like the rest of the human body and begins surrounding the foreign object with a part of the uterus lining, to keep it from moving around and chafing. Pulling it lose can be painful, but doesn't cause intense pain or damage if done correctly.

 

3 hours ago, Mad Hatter said:

This is something that has been bothering me too lately. Spoilering to not hijack the thread.

 

  Reveal hidden contents

I'm coming to the end of my second Mirena, but what does it even mean? They guarantee it for five years, but what happens after that? What's the hormonal drop off rate? I'm somewhat considering getting off of birth control for a while as an experiment, since 1) I don't have a steady partner and 2) it's been bothering me a lot that it completely masks what's going on in my body. I haven't had a real period in an a decade and I LOVE that, which is really the main reason for me to keep it. But what if it does affect me negatively and I'm not aware of it? It's been a long time to mess with hormones. And now that I'm really getting old maybe it's better to keep closer track as hormones will naturally change? I don't know. To bring it back to the original point, it bugs me that I don't know how it works towards its supposed end date (which seems to be bogus anyway and it actually lasts for a lot longer than 5 years) and if I were to remove wouldn't it'd be better to have it in for longer to make the process more gradual?

 

 

That right there is also a strong reason for why I wanted to avoid hormonal birth control.

  • Like 2

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4 hours ago, Mad Hatter said:

This is something that has been bothering me too lately. Spoilering to not hijack the thread.

 

  Reveal hidden contents

I'm coming to the end of my second Mirena, but what does it even mean? They guarantee it for five years, but what happens after that? What's the hormonal drop off rate? I'm somewhat considering getting off of birth control for a while as an experiment, since 1) I don't have a steady partner and 2) it's been bothering me a lot that it completely masks what's going on in my body. I haven't had a real period in an a decade and I LOVE that, which is really the main reason for me to keep it. But what if it does affect me negatively and I'm not aware of it? It's been a long time to mess with hormones. And now that I'm really getting old maybe it's better to keep closer track as hormones will naturally change? I don't know. To bring it back to the original point, it bugs me that I don't know how it works towards its supposed end date (which seems to be bogus anyway and it actually lasts for a lot longer than 5 years) and if I were to remove wouldn't it'd be better to have it in for longer to make the process more gradual?

 

Oh hijack away, but I'll join with the spoilering to make it easier to scroll past for the uninterested. 



That's actually why I switched to a mirena, I wanted to see if I felt any 'better' on less hormones. Ofcourse that turned out pretty impossible to judge and I was hearing too many stories of people who felt 'better' after ditching hormonal birth control completely. Even knowing that could be a placebo effect and how the hell did they judge it anyway? but it was compelling enough for me to decide to take out the mirena after 2 years. (who knows what I would've done if it had also made me stop menstruating, but it didn't) 

I don't really know if it did make me feel better... I did stabilise my moods somewhat.. but I also grew older, gained experience navigating difficult things, found more stability in life in general.. picked up exercise somewhere in that period..

I'd say the hassle of menstruating is well worth finding out what it'll do for you. But if you're considering waiting a bit longer to take it out anyway, then maybe try to gather some data? I really don't know, since you have the same fluctuating moods anyway. if you have a good period after taking it out, who is to say what's to 'blame'?

Sorry i'm only adding to the ugh of being female and making these decisions x) 

In the end I guess I went with the same philosophy I use with food.. 'nature probably knows best'. Though there is SO much wrong with that statement also. Food processing is awesome. And hormonal birth control is a great thing for some people who weren't blessed by nature. 

Summary; I don't know jack shit. 

 

1 hour ago, Scaly Freak said:

Thank you, I'm taking that as a big compliment. :) (And I'm refraining from correcting the misspelling of my name, because that's a compliment too. ;) )

Good! and yea.. auto correct x) 

 

1 hour ago, Scaly Freak said:

And I'm currently in a conservative part of the USA (one of the "red states"), so anything related to reproductive health in women is "icky" and no one wants to acknowledge it, let alone educate girls on it. People in general seem to be a lot more comfortable discussing cancer with someone who has it, than talking about birth control, or educating teens or adults about it.

Stop stop, I can't deal with more things to dislike about the USA, I like too many of the people living there and it's making my head hurt 😘

 

1 hour ago, Scaly Freak said:

Also, the process for getting an IUD inserted can be ridiculously complicated, since it's not a given that a GP or nurse practitioner can insert it for you. On that note, I highly recommend having it done by someone who does the process a lot, since they will have more practice in making it as comfortable for you as possible without dragging it out longer than necessary. This goes triple more for removing one, since the uterus works like the rest of the human body and begins surrounding the foreign object with a part of the uterus lining, to keep it from moving around and chafing. Pulling it lose can be painful, but doesn't cause intense pain or damage if done correctly.

The setting and taking out of my mirena was not such a big deal for me, but who knows what it'll be like after child birth. 

I like that they moved birth control consults and care to midwives in NL, it's a pretty logical thing to discuss at your post partum checkups.. and I imagine they get a lot more practice than a GP making people feel comfortable in this area and working around the cervix. A gynaecologist would make sense also, but believe it or not, I've never seen one in my life so I'd rather go to someone I know. 

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