Jump to content

Harriet's Written Year, Chapter Three


Recommended Posts

12 minutes ago, Harriet said:

I think if even a minority of women regularly go without, young women will feel more able to make that decision, too. Whoever breaks the standards first opens up space for those who follow (thank our foremothers for wearing trousers despite ridicule!) But yeah, I think it will happen easier in Berlin than Brisbane, and I believe the modestly built women will be more likely to give up bras than the amply curved.

Indeed, and I also suspect there will be an upswing in bralettes or other soft bras as a compromise. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
33 minutes ago, Mad Hatter said:

Also I've been super curious about how the whole bra thing will pan out. What will the split be between women who've discovered the joys of going braless and say "fuck it I'm not going back", and who will feel the pressure to go back to the boob prison because of societal pressure. And whether it will depend on the local culture. 

 

13 minutes ago, Harriet said:

 

I hope so. I just need to act like it and rinse out the reI think if even a minority of women regularly go without, young women will feel more able to make that decision, too. Whoever breaks the standards first opens up space for those who follow (thank our foremothers for wearing trousers despite ridicule!) But yeah, I think it will happen easier in Berlin than Brisbane, and I believe the modestly built women will be more likely to give up bras than the amply curved.

 

Amply curved women are underrepresented in bra burning conversations. To go entirely without some form of support can be extremely uncomfortable, and skin irritation with accompanying rash is not a rare outcome. While I am more than happy to burn an uncomfortable torture device that masquerades as a bra, I will never stop using the good ones.

  • Like 4

The Great Reading Thread of 2023

“I've always believed that failure is non-existent. What is failure? You go to the end of the season, then you lose the Super Bowl. Is that failing? To most people, maybe. But when you're picking apart why you failed, and now you're learning from that, then is that really failing? I don't think so." - Kobe Bryant, 1978-2020. Rest in peace, great warrior.

Personal Challenges, a.k.a.The Saga of Scalyfreak: Tutorial; Ch 1; Ch 2; Ch 3; Ch 4; Ch 5; Ch 6; Intermission; Intermission II; Ch 7; Ch 8; Ch 9; Ch 10; Ch 11; Ch 12 ; Ch 13; Ch 14Ch 15; Ch 16; Ch 17; Intermission IIICh 18; Ch 19; Ch 20; Ch 21; Ch 22; Ch 23; Ch 24; Ch 25; Intermission IV; Ch 26; Ch 27; Ch 28; Ch 29; Ch 30; Ch 31; Ch 32; Ch 33; Ch 34; Ch 35; Ch 36; Ch 37; Ch 38; Ch 39; Ch 40; Intermission V; Ch 41

Link to comment
1 minute ago, Scaly Freak said:

Amply curved women are underrepresented in bra burning conversations. To go entirely without some form of support can be extremely uncomfortable, and skin irritation with accompanying rash is not a rare outcome. While I am more than happy to burn an uncomfortable torture device that masquerades as a bra, I will never stop using the good ones.

I believe you, and would never want to take away your bras! They can also be oh so pretty. Not pretty enough for me to wear them, but definitely to look at. I do find it very interesting though that there are now countless of women rethinking their choices, or rather questioning who made the choice for them, and that's pretty cool whatever happens.

  • Like 4
  • That's Metal 1
Link to comment
1 hour ago, Mad Hatter said:

Also I've been super curious about how the whole bra thing will pan out. What will the split be between women who've discovered the joys of going braless and say "fuck it I'm not going back", and who will feel the pressure to go back to the boob prison because of societal pressure. And whether it will depend on the local culture. 

 

1 hour ago, Mad Hatter said:

Indeed, and I also suspect there will be an upswing in bralettes or other soft bras as a compromise. 

I'm fully on team bralette these days -- especially thin, padless ones. They do not prevent "nipping out" but they're soooo comfy and soft and I love them. I do not intend to go back to anything wired. 

  • Like 1

Raptron, alot assassin

67666564636261605958 575655545352515049484746454443424140393837363534333231302928272625242322212019181716151413121110987 | 6 | 5 | 4 | 3 | 2 | 1

Link to comment
2 hours ago, Mad Hatter said:

Not a fair comparison, the Japanese garden has a cat and automatically wins.

 

Perhaps the genius of the gardener was in creating an empty space for the cat to be. In the other garden, there could be a dozen moggies hunting mice in the hedges or soaking up sun in the tulips, and we wouldn't know.

 

1 hour ago, Harriet said:

It is for making profits. It promotes the person as object, and it creates the illusion that personal identity and merit are achievable through purchases. It promotes suffering and the mass hemorrhaging of people's time, money, and energy into impossible endeavours.

 

I'm willing to go so far as an "it's complicated". There are times and places the power of that mass message has tried to empower, and there are certainly people, men and women, who have learned to exploit the impact of the default male gaze. But it's hard to deny that it's often objectifying and makes the value of personhood a little too cozy with modern capitalism.

 

I think it's also worth considering that we, as white women, are not the most excluded from this sort of being valued. We can picture ourselves there. If we give up the time, money, and energy, we could theoretically achieve that approval. But look for a second at the beauty standard and how it treats dark-skinned people of color, or people of color with non-European features. Beauty is mainly for the light-skinned, the biracial, the Hispanic whose parents immigrated from Europe rather than the one whose ancestors were all native. And this beauty standard that can't be met has tangible costs. Often corporate and school dress codes mandate black women and girls have hairstyles that emulate white hair,  defining that as professional, and will discipline people for hairstyles designed for the texture  of black hair, defining that as messy or unprofessional. Emulating white hair is expensive, time consuming, and often chemically harsh on the skin and hair. Someone made a documentary a while back called "Good Hair", where he described black women's hair as the invisible Porsche in the garage. That's the financial penalty they take for it. Black girls nearly all have stories about frequent lye burns on their scalp when they were very young. We all pay a tax to this beauty standard, but it's disproportionately borne. So challenging the standards of mass media beauty in favor of something more inclusive of natural faces and bodies, while it's useful to us, also asks us about our unwitting participation in more invisible forms of discrimination.

 

1 hour ago, Harriet said:

I love the Japanese rock garden 😊 It actually has a great deal of detail, but the colours cohere and there are large spaces of simplicity where the eye can rest.

 

There's certainly a reason for a variety of aesthetic goals, but I think it'd be no bad thing in day to day life for me to be perceived that way.

 

There's also something there about finding beauty in the honesty of materials. Look at candid photos of women absorbed in doing things, not dressed up or wearing makeup, not young, not paying attention to the camera. And then look at how many emotions and character traits are forbidden to women when they're trying to be conventionally beautiful, and how compelling the integrity of those emotions and strong characters can be. Even celebrities who partly but don't fully reject the standards they need to maintain. Tilda Swinton. Jamie Lee Curtis. They may rake the sand, but they let the rocks and blue wildflowers stay wild, and the thing we appreciate is the honesty of the rocks and blue wildflowers.

  • Like 4

I felt like I could run forever, like I could smell the wind and feel the grass under my feet, and just run forever.

Current Challenge: #24 - Mrs. Cosmopolite Challenge

Past: #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6,  #7#8, #9#10, #11a & #11b, #12, #13, #14, #15, #16, #17, #18, #19, #20, #21, #22, #23

Link to comment
1 hour ago, Mad Hatter said:

there are now countless of women rethinking their choices, or rather questioning who made the choice for them, and that's pretty cool whatever happens.

 

This is one of the things that needs to happen a lot more. 

 

Also, everything @sarakingdom said about colorism and whiteness being the standard. All of it.

 

The makeup nerd in me is very excited about the current industry push for more inclusive makeup, with pigmentation levels and textures that actually work on dark skin tones. There's a similar movement going on with hair products for hair and scalps that is not north-European in origin. Although the beauty industry is a huge part part of the evil society sub-set that brainwashes us into thinking we are unworthy, I am happy about this shift towards more inclusiveness, and I hope it lasts.

  • Like 2

The Great Reading Thread of 2023

“I've always believed that failure is non-existent. What is failure? You go to the end of the season, then you lose the Super Bowl. Is that failing? To most people, maybe. But when you're picking apart why you failed, and now you're learning from that, then is that really failing? I don't think so." - Kobe Bryant, 1978-2020. Rest in peace, great warrior.

Personal Challenges, a.k.a.The Saga of Scalyfreak: Tutorial; Ch 1; Ch 2; Ch 3; Ch 4; Ch 5; Ch 6; Intermission; Intermission II; Ch 7; Ch 8; Ch 9; Ch 10; Ch 11; Ch 12 ; Ch 13; Ch 14Ch 15; Ch 16; Ch 17; Intermission IIICh 18; Ch 19; Ch 20; Ch 21; Ch 22; Ch 23; Ch 24; Ch 25; Intermission IV; Ch 26; Ch 27; Ch 28; Ch 29; Ch 30; Ch 31; Ch 32; Ch 33; Ch 34; Ch 35; Ch 36; Ch 37; Ch 38; Ch 39; Ch 40; Intermission V; Ch 41

Link to comment

That purple eye makeup....! Wow.

The Great Reading Thread of 2023

“I've always believed that failure is non-existent. What is failure? You go to the end of the season, then you lose the Super Bowl. Is that failing? To most people, maybe. But when you're picking apart why you failed, and now you're learning from that, then is that really failing? I don't think so." - Kobe Bryant, 1978-2020. Rest in peace, great warrior.

Personal Challenges, a.k.a.The Saga of Scalyfreak: Tutorial; Ch 1; Ch 2; Ch 3; Ch 4; Ch 5; Ch 6; Intermission; Intermission II; Ch 7; Ch 8; Ch 9; Ch 10; Ch 11; Ch 12 ; Ch 13; Ch 14Ch 15; Ch 16; Ch 17; Intermission IIICh 18; Ch 19; Ch 20; Ch 21; Ch 22; Ch 23; Ch 24; Ch 25; Intermission IV; Ch 26; Ch 27; Ch 28; Ch 29; Ch 30; Ch 31; Ch 32; Ch 33; Ch 34; Ch 35; Ch 36; Ch 37; Ch 38; Ch 39; Ch 40; Intermission V; Ch 41

Link to comment
54 minutes ago, raptron said:

 

I'm fully on team bralette these days -- especially thin, padless ones. They do not prevent "nipping out" but they're soooo comfy and soft and I love them. I do not intend to go back to anything wired. 

 

Me neither. Wireless or nothing

 

28 minutes ago, sarakingdom said:

We all pay a tax to this beauty standard, but it's disproportionately borne.

 

I agree.

 

28 minutes ago, sarakingdom said:

So challenging the standards of mass media beauty in favor of something more inclusive of natural faces and bodies, while it's useful to us, also asks us about our unwitting participation in more invisible forms of discrimination.

 

I'm not asking for my natural, un-made-up self to be included in media standards of beauty. I'm giving myself permission to show up, beautiful or not, and also to appreciate the beauty of myself as an animal made by nature, in the same way I appreciate other things made by nature, like rocks and sparrows. I don't need anyone to change their standards for this to happen (though I understand it's easier for me to do this due to not being made to feel ugly specifically for my skin colour and other racial features, which means I start with massively less psychic damage than some other women). I'm not challenging mass media beauty standards or beauty companies, exactly, I'm withdrawing my cooperation and cash in part because of how I want to live, and in part because I reject the capitalist and misogynistic values I associate with them. I don't think that my participating or refusing to participate will make much difference for non white women, because participating helps enforce the existing white standards, yet refusing opens up the space of acceptable existence more effectively for people who look more like me... In any case I daresay my choices are fairly irrelevant to the grand scheme. They make a difference to me, though.

 

28 minutes ago, sarakingdom said:

There's also something there about finding beauty in the honesty of materials. Look at candid photos of women absorbed in doing things, not dressed up or wearing makeup, not young, not paying attention to the camera. And then look at how many emotions and character traits are forbidden to women when they're trying to be conventionally beautiful, and how compelling the integrity of those emotions and strong characters can be. Even celebrities who partly but don't fully reject the standards they need to maintain. Tilda Swinton. Jamie Lee Curtis. They may rake the sand, but they let the rocks and blue wildflowers stay wild, and the thing we appreciate is the honesty of the rocks and blue wildflowers.

 

A beautiful perspective. And that's a beautiful video.

 

 

Let cheese and oxen and mead crowd out our secret desires for power and domination - Harriet the Viking

Just be bold, fluid and unapologetic, not small, hairy and indecisive - Harriet the Artist

You can absorb me! - Harriet the Contextless Guru

Link to comment
3 minutes ago, Harriet said:

I'm not asking for my natural, un-made-up self to be included in media standards of beauty. I'm giving myself permission to show up, beautiful or not, and also to appreciate the beauty of myself as an animal made by nature, in the same way I appreciate other things made by nature, like rocks and sparrows.

 

I don't entirely differentiate these two things. When I say challenge the standards, I'm not quite saying "represent more people in them" (though that's a start), but challenge the validity of their existence. Certainly we'll never find everyone equally attractive to us personally, but what use are we if we can't appreciate the dignity of other people being very much who they are? Beauty standards as they exist now, in all the ways I can imagine them existing, don't appreciate that dignity.

 

And that, IMO, is where challenging the standards helps those who are less valued by society. 70 year old women are granted no dignity by society. Very few beauty standards will ever include them. And yet, a great many are stunningly attractive, or badass, or utterly amazing, if you view them with the inherent human dignity they should be viewed with. We do it by default for men. Men in their 70s and older can be commonly respected for being strong, attractive, aging well, still hot, and so on, when in fact they're not aging any differently from women on the whole. Those men may take themselves down a peg or two by joking about their enlarged prostates and reading glasses, and people will say their humble sense of humor just proves how great they are, but it's very, very rarely done without their consent, and tends to horrify us when it is. Because we're trained to always view (primarily white) men with dignity in society. We don't extend that courtesy to other groups by default.

 

Well, the rocks have rocky dignity, and the sparrows have chirpy dignity. There's a palatial dignity to one of those gardens, and an understated naturalistic, meditative dignity to the other. But if we don't challenge beauty standards as our main way of granting women and minorities dignity, it'll always be conditional and revocable.

  • Like 5

I felt like I could run forever, like I could smell the wind and feel the grass under my feet, and just run forever.

Current Challenge: #24 - Mrs. Cosmopolite Challenge

Past: #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6,  #7#8, #9#10, #11a & #11b, #12, #13, #14, #15, #16, #17, #18, #19, #20, #21, #22, #23

Link to comment
6 hours ago, sarakingdom said:

When I say challenge the standards, I'm not quite saying "represent more people in them" (though that's a start), but challenge the validity of their existence. Certainly we'll never find everyone equally attractive to us personally, but what use are we if we can't appreciate the dignity of other people being very much who they are? Beauty standards as they exist now, in all the ways I can imagine them existing, don't appreciate that dignity.

 

I see what you mean. Then I suppose I am doing what you say by granting myself beauty-as-dignity. I like to think I have already granted it to others more generously than to myself.

 

6 hours ago, sarakingdom said:

Well, the rocks have rocky dignity, and the sparrows have chirpy dignity. There's a palatial dignity to one of those gardens, and an understated naturalistic, meditative dignity to the other. But if we don't challenge beauty standards as our main way of granting women and minorities dignity, it'll always be conditional and revocable.

 

Yes indeed. Achieving media mandated beauty-as-f***ability may be nice but is a very insecure basis for self esteem and respect, given that we age out of the standard.

  • Like 3

Let cheese and oxen and mead crowd out our secret desires for power and domination - Harriet the Viking

Just be bold, fluid and unapologetic, not small, hairy and indecisive - Harriet the Artist

You can absorb me! - Harriet the Contextless Guru

Link to comment
18 hours ago, Harriet said:

I see what you mean. Then I suppose I am doing what you say by granting myself beauty-as-dignity. I like to think I have already granted it to others more generously than to myself.

 

Very likely. We're always hardest on ourselves. But it is true; the value of our presence in the world, whichever bit of it we happen to be standing on, is not premised on our looks or the way we're perceived.

 

In the interests of Pratchetting up this discussion, which is always a good option, I want to talk about Sybil Ramkin. What an amazing character. She's introduced as a walking caricature of precisely the sort of woman that society doesn't view with dignity. Even Vimes doesn't, when he first meets her. But Pratchett does. And Sybil continues being so very Sybil through the books, and you realize she's quietly amazing. Not because she becomes what society values, but because she always was and most people look through her. Because Pratchett, and Vimes, keep seeing her with dignity.

 

There's a really interesting running theme in Pratchett's books about the subtle failure of gender equality that happens when we value women for doing what men can do and acting more like men, without actually changing prejudices about things that are feminine, and Sybil is its biggest representative, in a way. And whenever you see someone dismiss Sybil, they're wrong. She does amazing, heroic things, not by becoming more like what we perceive as a hero, but simply by continuing to be ordinary, undervalued Sybil.

 

Seeing people with dignity is actually a really nice thing in Pratchett's books. Vimes learns to see trolls with dignity, and dwarfs with dignity, and Nobby Nobbs with dignity. And Angua learns to see Vimes with dignity. Heck, I guess Vimes learns to see himself with dignity in his first two books. And, oddly, the one person who sees the value in nearly everyone is Vetinari. It might be because he's considering selling them, but...

  • Like 2

I felt like I could run forever, like I could smell the wind and feel the grass under my feet, and just run forever.

Current Challenge: #24 - Mrs. Cosmopolite Challenge

Past: #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6,  #7#8, #9#10, #11a & #11b, #12, #13, #14, #15, #16, #17, #18, #19, #20, #21, #22, #23

Link to comment
5 hours ago, sarakingdom said:

 

Very likely. We're always hardest on ourselves. But it is true; the value of our presence in the world, whichever bit of it we happen to be standing on, is not premised on our looks or the way we're perceived.

 

In the interests of Pratchetting up this discussion, which is always a good option, I want to talk about Sybil Ramkin. What an amazing character. She's introduced as a walking caricature of precisely the sort of woman that society doesn't view with dignity. Even Vimes doesn't, when he first meets her. But Pratchett does. And Sybil continues being so very Sybil through the books, and you realize she's quietly amazing. Not because she becomes what society values, but because she always was and most people look through her. Because Pratchett, and Vimes, keep seeing her with dignity.

 

There's a really interesting running theme in Pratchett's books about the subtle failure of gender equality that happens when we value women for doing what men can do and acting more like men, without actually changing prejudices about things that are feminine, and Sybil is its biggest representative, in a way. And whenever you see someone dismiss Sybil, they're wrong. She does amazing, heroic things, not by becoming more like what we perceive as a hero, but simply by continuing to be ordinary, undervalued Sybil.

 

Seeing people with dignity is actually a really nice thing in Pratchett's books. Vimes learns to see trolls with dignity, and dwarfs with dignity, and Nobby Nobbs with dignity. And Angua learns to see Vimes with dignity. Heck, I guess Vimes learns to see himself with dignity in his first two books. And, oddly, the one person who sees the value in nearly everyone is Vetinari. It might be because he's considering selling them, but...

 

Ha. Yes, Practchettisation is never wrong. He does bring dignity to a wide range of imperfect characters by granting them the lovingly detailed attention of an author and artist. He also has a great deal of love and sympathy for ordinary people who go about their ordinary lives without flashy heroics.

 

9 hours ago, fearless 2.0 said:

hope you ar doing well today! :) 

 

Thanks for checking. Yesterday was a bit of a loss but today is a new attempt.

Let cheese and oxen and mead crowd out our secret desires for power and domination - Harriet the Viking

Just be bold, fluid and unapologetic, not small, hairy and indecisive - Harriet the Artist

You can absorb me! - Harriet the Contextless Guru

Link to comment

Friday

invocate: no

meditate: no
write: no
lift/yoga: integral strength
walk: no
track food: yes

paint: no

 

So yesterday I had real trouble getting started, as you see. I opened the document for my writing project but didn't do anything with it. I didn't get enough sleep the night before and I was ambushed by the imp of inertia. I spent the day trying to find out what yarns I can get from Germany, and choosing a colour, and counting the hours until I could go back to sleep. It was cold and grey and I couldn't get warm all day, even with clothes and heating and baths, so I hardly wanted to go walking.

 

I did workout in the morning, though. The first two of my chin up negatives were a little slower, instead of only the first one.

 

It has been quite effortless eating at or above maintenance for the last couple of days. I hope it won't be too hard to go back.

  • Like 2

Let cheese and oxen and mead crowd out our secret desires for power and domination - Harriet the Viking

Just be bold, fluid and unapologetic, not small, hairy and indecisive - Harriet the Artist

You can absorb me! - Harriet the Contextless Guru

Link to comment

Friday

invocate: yes-proper ritual

meditate: yes
write: yes, started outlining my greer review
lift/yoga: yoga
walk: yes
track food: yes

paint: no


I bought yellow flowers, spent some time outside and held a very pleasant and healing ritual for beltaine. There were invocations to the elements, based on the season itself, then to a relevant goddess. I took inspiration from several places and lit two fires to pass through, leaving certain symbolic things on the outside (you shall not pass!) including body hatred, false beauty idols, and fear of sharing my mind/my work. I wore green and did something for every sense (except taste, but I shall drink some delicious wine (in a health promotingly modest amount) presently).

 

I am still tired from yesterday and haven't painted, but that's okay. While waiting for new yarn to arrive I have decided to make mitts out of leftover yarn. They shall be of simple moss stitch, like Bofur's mitts in the hobbit. But less chunky. I haven't made anything in the round for ages because I absolutely hate the magic circle technique with circular needles. But I dug out some double pointed needles and they are working very well. I think there will be many mitts in my future. Ori and Gandalf also have mitts that should be easy to recreate!

  • Like 4
  • That's Metal 1

Let cheese and oxen and mead crowd out our secret desires for power and domination - Harriet the Viking

Just be bold, fluid and unapologetic, not small, hairy and indecisive - Harriet the Artist

You can absorb me! - Harriet the Contextless Guru

Link to comment
3 hours ago, Harriet said:

Friday

invocate: yes-proper ritual

meditate: yes
write: yes, started outlining my greer review
lift/yoga: yoga
walk: yes
track food: yes

paint: no


I bought yellow flowers, spent some time outside and held a very pleasant and healing ritual for beltaine. There were invocations to the elements, based on the season itself, then to a relevant goddess. I took inspiration from several places and lit two fires to pass through, leaving certain symbolic things on the outside (you shall not pass!) including body hatred, false beauty idols, and fear of sharing my mind/my work. I wore green and did something for every sense (except taste, but I shall drink some delicious wine (in a health promotingly modest amount) presently).

 

I am still tired from yesterday and haven't painted, but that's okay. While waiting for new yarn to arrive I have decided to make mitts out of leftover yarn. They shall be of simple moss stitch, like Bofur's mitts in the hobbit. But less chunky. I haven't made anything in the round for ages because I absolutely hate the magic circle technique with circular needles. But I dug out some double pointed needles and they are working very well. I think there will be many mitts in my future. Ori and Gandalf also have mitts that should be easy to recreate!

I like the ritual stuff you did. Heard today of a lilac plant the farmers used to make crowns for their cows so "the witches" couldnt make them "dry" ( not give milk anymore). wishing you a great start into real springtime. Hope you paint a lot and write a lot and feel well most of the time. Will take a break for one challenge. Thank you so much for your daily support! It helped a lot and I really appreciate doing this with you! ❤️

See ya soon... I wont be able to resist this page for long! :) 

  • Thanks 1

be fearlessly yourself! :onthego:

Link to comment
8 hours ago, fearless 2.0 said:

I like the ritual stuff you did. Heard today of a lilac plant the farmers used to make crowns for their cows so "the witches" couldnt make them "dry" ( not give milk anymore). wishing you a great start into real springtime. Hope you paint a lot and write a lot and feel well most of the time. Will take a break for one challenge. Thank you so much for your daily support! It helped a lot and I really appreciate doing this with you! ❤️

See ya soon... I wont be able to resist this page for long! :) 

 

 

Ha, they should have worked on making the witches happy instead.

Ohhhh, I'll miss you ❤️ But I hope you have a lovely restorative break. I'll be here when you come back or visit.

Let cheese and oxen and mead crowd out our secret desires for power and domination - Harriet the Viking

Just be bold, fluid and unapologetic, not small, hairy and indecisive - Harriet the Artist

You can absorb me! - Harriet the Contextless Guru

Link to comment

Challenge Summary

 

My goal was to build habits slowly so as to not trigger resistance or a slug phase. During the challenge we also realised I need to slow down my workouts to match my recovery capacities, and to work on some weaknesses, as frustrating as I find that. I discovered integral strength which seems to be a good fit. I kept things slow but consistent. I think my shoulders are feeling stronger and more responsive already. I did at least token amounts of each habit almost every day. I lost 4.3 pounds despite my recent few days of eating more generously. I published my Millet review, finished reading and making notes on Greer, and started painting again. 

  • Like 4

Let cheese and oxen and mead crowd out our secret desires for power and domination - Harriet the Viking

Just be bold, fluid and unapologetic, not small, hairy and indecisive - Harriet the Artist

You can absorb me! - Harriet the Contextless Guru

Link to comment

Great challenge, your consistency has been awesome! 

 

1 hour ago, Harriet said:

During the challenge we also realised I need to slow down my workouts to match my recovery capacities, and to work on some weaknesses, as frustrating as I find that.

You might as well accept it because this will always be the case. :) Everyone's starting limits might be wildly different, but they still need to be respected. And however much you work on them, there will always be pesky weaknesses.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
5 hours ago, Mad Hatter said:

Great challenge, your consistency has been awesome! 

 

I really believe it was possible because I slowed down a bit.

 

5 hours ago, Mad Hatter said:

You might as well accept it because this will always be the case. :) Everyone's starting limits might be wildly different, but they still need to be respected. And however much you work on them, there will always be pesky weaknesses.

 

It certainly seems that way. It would be better if I had magnificent eight legged horses with endless endurance. But given that I have tiny sleepy ponies, my choices are running them to exhaustion and setting them up to need significant time off, or not running them to exhaustion and taking less time off. Running them like racing horses is the first choice, but with delusion.

  • Like 2

Let cheese and oxen and mead crowd out our secret desires for power and domination - Harriet the Viking

Just be bold, fluid and unapologetic, not small, hairy and indecisive - Harriet the Artist

You can absorb me! - Harriet the Contextless Guru

Link to comment
1 minute ago, Harriet said:

It certainly seems that way. It would be better if I had magnificent eight legged horses with endless endurance. But given that I have tiny sleepy ponies, my choices are running them to exhaustion and setting them up to need significant time off, or not running them to exhaustion and taking less time off. Running them like racing horses is the first choice, but with delusion.

My point is that even the magnificent race horses don't have endless endurance. In fact they'll run until they literally collapse and die, which nobody wants. Also, your ponies might be a little slower, but they're no less magnificent.

  • Like 1
  • That's Metal 1
Link to comment
3 minutes ago, Mad Hatter said:

My point is that even the magnificent race horses don't have endless endurance. In fact they'll run until they literally collapse and die, which nobody wants.

 

Indeed. You must run each beast according to its capacity.

 

3 minutes ago, Mad Hatter said:

Also, your ponies might be a little slower, but they're no less magnificent.

why, thank you ❤️

horse GIF

Let cheese and oxen and mead crowd out our secret desires for power and domination - Harriet the Viking

Just be bold, fluid and unapologetic, not small, hairy and indecisive - Harriet the Artist

You can absorb me! - Harriet the Contextless Guru

Link to comment
3 hours ago, Harriet said:

Indeed. You must run each beast according to its capacity.

 

And often we need to force our beasts to slow down and rest, because they are not always smart enough to make that decision on their own.

 

And technically a need to rest is not a weakness. It's something that we very easily can turn into a weakness though, by not resting. The whole point of doing a recovery day after a lifting day is because the lifting is not when our muscles grow bigger and stringer, that happens during the recovery phase. 

  • Like 2

The Great Reading Thread of 2023

“I've always believed that failure is non-existent. What is failure? You go to the end of the season, then you lose the Super Bowl. Is that failing? To most people, maybe. But when you're picking apart why you failed, and now you're learning from that, then is that really failing? I don't think so." - Kobe Bryant, 1978-2020. Rest in peace, great warrior.

Personal Challenges, a.k.a.The Saga of Scalyfreak: Tutorial; Ch 1; Ch 2; Ch 3; Ch 4; Ch 5; Ch 6; Intermission; Intermission II; Ch 7; Ch 8; Ch 9; Ch 10; Ch 11; Ch 12 ; Ch 13; Ch 14Ch 15; Ch 16; Ch 17; Intermission IIICh 18; Ch 19; Ch 20; Ch 21; Ch 22; Ch 23; Ch 24; Ch 25; Intermission IV; Ch 26; Ch 27; Ch 28; Ch 29; Ch 30; Ch 31; Ch 32; Ch 33; Ch 34; Ch 35; Ch 36; Ch 37; Ch 38; Ch 39; Ch 40; Intermission V; Ch 41

Link to comment
15 hours ago, Harriet said:

Challenge Summary

 

My goal was to build habits slowly so as to not trigger resistance or a slug phase. During the challenge we also realised I need to slow down my workouts to match my recovery capacities, and to work on some weaknesses, as frustrating as I find that. I discovered integral strength which seems to be a good fit. I kept things slow but consistent. I think my shoulders are feeling stronger and more responsive already. I did at least token amounts of each habit almost every day. I lost 4.3 pounds despite my recent few days of eating more generously. I published my Millet review, finished reading and making notes on Greer, and started painting again. 

 

Great job this challenge! You accomplished a lot on many fronts while also listening to your body. 

 

tumblr_mj5rapeH9c1s5pidpo1_500.gif

  • Thanks 1

-:- THE LIONESS -:-

Challenge 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 2.8, 2.9, 2.10 

 

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

New here? Please check out our Privacy Policy and Community Guidelines