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Flytch

Can you work out every day?

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Hey

I've taken to doing my workout every other day, so monday, wednesday, friday etc. It is a pretty all encompassing consisting of goblet squats, mountain climbs, single arm dumbell swings, pushups, bicycle crunches, dumbell rows, planks, incline dumbell flies, burpees, weighted squats and shadow boxing.

I recall reading that a rest day is required for actual fat to be burned and muscle gained, is this true? And if so, can anyone suggest workouts that could be done on sequential days with a focus on weight loss with only my floor and dumbells?

Flytch

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In an ideal situation, there's no such thing as overtraining, just undereating and undersleeping.

The reality is, though, you aren't a professional/olympic-class athlete that dedicates 95% of your time to training, and your body (and just as importantly, your MIND) needs time to recover.

The classic method is to alternate muscle groups if you want to workout 5-7 times a week. Do upper body MWF, lower body TuTHSa for example.

With compound exercises, you're working large groups, so there's bound to be overlap in the workouts so watch for fatigue reducing your effectiveness.

Ultimately, it really depends on how hard you want to push yourself. If you want to squat 7 days a week, go for it. You can still get big and strong as long as you do it properly.

Read Chaos and Pain for examples of people who hit it, and hit it hard.

Here's an example:

http://chaosandpain.blogspot.com/2010/1 ... -your.html

"To men who had the will and applied it, Saxon and Aston, both managed to put overhead upwards of 300 lbs with one hand- there’s not a single person on the planet who could even begin to approach that feat, much less duplicate it. Hermann Goerner, at a bodyweight of between 240 and 275, deadlifted 727 with one hand and 793.66 with two, both raw and natural, and with a double overhand hook grip. (Willoughby, 94) According to powerliftingwatch.com, there's only one person in the current rankings at 242 who could match Goerner's deadlift, and only 3 at 275- and none of those guys are in tested federations. Charles Rigoulot, at a bodyweight of 200 lbs, clean and jerked 402 in 1924 (Willoughby, 98), a feat untouched until the steroid era by a guy of a similar weight, and the guy who beat him never punched a Nazi officer in the fucking face- Rigoulot did, even though he was a Frenchman.

So how, then, could this have been possible? These guys trained constantly, competed far more frequently than modern lifters, and were capable of lifting tremendous poundages in an astonishing array of lifts, refusing to merely consign themselves to excellence in one or two lifts. They should not, by the standards of the modern nay-sayers, have been able to lift a paperweight, given their random, brutal, and consistent training regimens, without the aid of supplemental GH, steroids, and of course, the ubiquitous black magic utilized by anyone who does something the plebes cannot. If you’re finding yourself offended or disgusted by any part of this series, or if you're busy making excuses for why you can't handle more than four training sessions a week, you’re probably a generally weak person, tell people that you “test badly†to excuse your insanely low grades and standardized testing scores, and a bad lay."

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sure you can.

i do.

im a big believer in the 'overtraining is mental' thing.

just do it right and learn to listen to your body.

i workout when i want to. if my body says take a day off, i take a day off.

for focus on weight loss i'd suggest circuits. lots of compound movements, keep your heart rate up. no rest in between exercises.

oh, and lots of jumping jacks/jump rope.

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I did high volume bodyweight exercise every day for about two months straight. I didn't get overuse injuries. I didn't get sick. All that happened was I got really thick shoulders and real strength.

The human body is made to move a lot.

Keep your workouts short, intense, varied and fun, eat protein and sleep 8 hours. You'll get big and strong while all the other guys in the gym will be waiting a week for their arms to "recover."

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What Spezzy said.

Overtraining injuries often occur when someone ignores and injury and keeps working it until KAPOW! disaster strikes. I've also observed that the "overtraining" results when someone works with sloppy form or works well past the point where they are able to maintain proper form while exercising (due to inability, unfamiliarity with the movement, soreness from other workouts, etc). Basically, pay attention to what your body is telling you. If it feels fine or is just a little sore, you are probably fine to work out. If you have serious deep tissue pain, excessively sore or stiff joints, or have muscular soreness to a degree that normal movement is difficult - like I had after that first kickboxing session! - then you should take a rest day or work a different part of your body. If you can't perform the movement with correct form, modify it until you can or try something else. I find that I do best with one 'rest' day a week, wherein I don't to a purposeful workout but will likely still engage in other normal activities, usually something like walking or cleaning, or whatever. Others find that they need a couple of days off, still others won't take any time off at all and are just dandy.

Every now and then, I need to back off from a specific activity I'm training on for a longer period of time in order for things to sink into my brain. This was especially noticeable when I was struggling with new techniques or concepts in dance and would typically happen towards the end of a term or during periods in which I was somewhat burnt out for other reasons. A week or two of not engaging in that specific training activity/dance/choreography would result in a sudden spike in comprehension and ability when I did return. This seems to happen a couple of times a year, so I just go with it.

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When you strength train, you destroy muscle fibers. These need, I think, about 2 days to rebuild. That rebuilding process is what is crucial, because that's when your muscles grow and become stronger. So you should always wait 2-3 days before hitting the same muscle group again.

You should do what some of the other people said and alternate muscle groups day to day, so you can still work out every day. Don't forget the importance of resting too.

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Of course you can.

However, if you work out like an idiot then you won't be able to.

Add volume slowly.

Don't go from a 3x week program to a 7x week program instantly

Spread it out. And increase your training slowly.

So yea.

Do it, do it slowly, and do it properly.

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I would also add my voice to those saying that you can but perhaps doing other things then your core workout day after day. I wouldn't want to do bench presses every single day but having yoga/pilates or a sport to do is beneficial as you are building an integrated body without massive destruction due to lack of rebuild time.

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When you strength train, you destroy muscle fibers. These need, I think, about 2 days to rebuild. That rebuilding process is what is crucial, because that's when your muscles grow and become stronger. So you should always wait 2-3 days before hitting the same muscle group again.

Yeah, but the thing is that everyone is different, and more importantly, so are their goals. For everyone who says you cannot work out the same muscle every day and see any sort of improvement, there are people like Steve over at Let No One Say You Can't who goes through periods where he squats every single day for weeks on end.

"For the past few weeks, I've been squatting every single day, sometimes twice a day, with heavy singles and doubles exclusively. I haven't done any higher rep sets for quite some time. Interesting that my old rep PR with 365 was 3 (he did 7 after this period of what many would call "overtraining").

I decided to see what a max chart would calculate as my estimated 1RM. I know these aren't very accurate, but it's sometimes a nice mental boost, which it was in this case, showing a 1RM of 438 as my estimated max. If I actually got that in a meet, that would beat the state raw record in both the 148 and 165 lb. divisions, as they currently stand. Sweet. That's all the confirmation I need to continue training squat daily and heavy. "

http://sreishus.blogspot.com/2010/09/squat-rep-pr.html

As far as a set recovery time for optimum performance, it really comes down to getting enough to eat and enough to sleep. Studies have shown it can take as little as 6 hours to recover from levels of lactic acid, cortisol build up, and so on - each person will be different, and multiple variables can affect it each time. The biggest hurdle to training every day is the mental aspect. See my above post (#2 in this thread) for a link to Chaos and Pain - you will find a lot of articles showing that people can and do train every day. As Dantes said, if you do it, do it properly.

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My question is whether training 7 days a week is really necessary unless you are looking to compete in a major powerlifting/bodybuilding competition?

Most of what I've read on building healthy definition and hypertrophy says that you don't need to spend much more than 3-4 days a week in the gym

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What do you mean necessary and need? What're your goals here? If you want to lose fat, you have to burn calories. Best way is to get out and move more, every day or nearly every day. If you don't want to aimlessly wander about in circles about your neighborhood (which is one of MY favorite activities), you might as well develop a skill or gain strength or endurance or agility while you move.

If you want to gain strength, then if you work on it every day you'll get stronger faster than if you work on it a few times a week.

Of course you can exercise every day. Anyone who's ever worked an intensely physical job for 8 hours a day will agree with that.

Personally, I don't go to exhaustion, but I do a fairly thorough workout for 20 minutes or so every day. Various activities on top of that. When I get muscle fatigue, it's due to bad diet and bad sleep, not overtraining.

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My question is whether training 7 days a week is really necessary unless you are looking to compete in a major powerlifting/bodybuilding competition?

Most of what I've read on building healthy definition and hypertrophy says that you don't need to spend much more than 3-4 days a week in the gym

I'm with Alethea, what do you consider 'necessary' and 'need'?

I'm not training for any sort of competition.

I want to move and jump and run and lift every day. Because I like it. So I do.

I want to get stronger and better and faster. So I train hard to get there. A lot.

There is no 'necessity' or 'need'.

If I wanted to do the bare minimum, I would.

But I most certainly wouldn't see the results I've seen.

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"Necessary" for large strength and body composition changes - I've gained 5 lbs and gotten a fair bit bigger (Tried to get my cat out from under the bed and suddenly I don't fit anymore) this month only going to the gym 3 times a week - Admittedly I 10-pin bowl and play Ultimate once a week each so I guess I could technically say I workout 5 days a week - My question was whether hitting the gym with specific muscle training 7 days a week is an effective use of your time if your goal isn't competition - Significant body composition and strength increases can easily be achieved with only 3 gym days a week, and I would argue that going 7 times a week makes burning out far more likely.

It just seems to me that there are diminishing returns on your time spent at the gym past a certain point - I guess the engineer in my finds the efficiency loss ineffective if a competition where marginal gains can reap significant benefits isn't your goal.

I do however agree that remaining active on days that you aren't at the gym is of net benefit - I just don't consider that a workout.

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i think we're looking at this completely differently, honestly.

you say "i can get to point x only doing this 3x a week".

sure you can.

but i WANT to go every day. I don't want to take a day off.

and i see amazing results training this way.

i think the question was do you HAVE to take a day off.

and the answer is no, if you're doing everything smart, you don't have to.

part of that 'smart' is making sure you don't burn out.

and yes, at a certain point, you will see diminishing returns if you're not doing it right. example: i only do heavy deadlifts once a week, because i know that if i do these more than once a week, i will actually be able to lift less. but on other days i do movements that assist the deadlift - like light deads, rack pulls, kettlebell swings, etc...

i get amazing results doing it this way. much better than when i was training three times a week. that's me personally, though.

if i don't want to go to the gym, i don't go. because if i'm not enjoying it, what's the point? but most days, that time in the gym is the best part of my day.

so its not "necessity" or "need"

it's "want"

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I decided not to read every reply on here and just post my opinion.

I believe you can workout every muscle group every day. It is called circuit training. There are downsides to this, of course. You have to make sure you are replacing what is being lost (plenty of proteins and carbs and good fats primarily). Also you wouldn't physically be able to keep this up for longer than a month. So you could do a month of circuit training, then a month of simply cardio or something else.

A word of warning though: If you do workout the same muscle groups two days in a row or more...you need to stop if you feel uncomfortable (in a way not associated with simply lifting). You should not lift to failure (as in doing reps until you cannot do any more). And after a week of doing this constantly...you will need to rest a day or two just to make sure you aren't causing any damage.

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Also you wouldn't physically be able to keep this up for longer than a month.

DarkKent, check out Spezzy's Challenge logs. She's been keeping this up, near as I can recall, since October. I think she MAY have taken as much as a 3 days off when she had pneumonia.

Marc, same thing. Look at Spezzys PRs from October to now. I DARE you to try to replicate that doing 3 days a week. Spezzy isn't looking to compete. She's looking to excel. And she does that, in the fastest amount of time possible, by doing it every day.

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Just want to suggest that people also consider adding some periodization into your workout routines. For example, every 12 weeks, take a week off, even if you don't feel like you need it. Your body will recover better over the long-term (years). Also, another classic periodization piece is to do a 1/2 volume set every 3rd/4th time you hit the same workout. From people I've trained with, this has helped them to keep making gains over the long term, and avoid adrenal fatigue.

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@Alethea: I was saying you cannot Circuit train every day for a month. I know spezzy works out most days...but she doesn't circuit train every day. Which is still awesome.

If you do certain exercises on certain days and rest those muscles next time you work out...you can workout every day for forever and be okay. (kind of)

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Kind of late to the party considering it was originally posted in December, but you can workout the same muscle groups every day, for a week or however long straight. I feel like a broken record sometimes, but... Grease The Groove! I plan on Deadlifting almost everyday next Challenge now that I've got a set-up planned and ready to be built.

http://talkback.stomp.com.sg/forums/showthread.php?t=10779

"Four times powerlifting world record holder Dr. Judd Biasiotto set up a bench in his kitchen, got in the habit of hitting it every time he was in the area and put up a 319BP @ 132!"

"According to former world weight lifting champion Prof. Arkady Vorobyev, one to six reps are optimal for training of high caliber weightlifters and increasing this number hinders strength development. Or, as Luke Iams put it, "Anything over six reps is bodybuilding."

Do more reps, and your body will think that you are practicing a totally different lift. Dr. Biasiotto who once squatted an unreal 605 @ 130 has switched to bodybuilding and knocks off 325x25 these days. His legs are no longer 'a pair of pliers in shorts' as they used to be in his days of heavy triples and world records, but he would be the first one to tell you that there is no way he could put up a massive single training this way.

Of course, for bodyweight pull-ups, push-ups, and other commando feats of staying power you will need to bump up the reps to satisfy the law of specificity. Roger Antonson worked up to training sets of nine by the time he set a personal record of twenty chin-ups."

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@ArmyMBM 605 pounds squat whilst weighing 130??????????????????????? WTF!!!!!!!! i love that dude how tall was he? to be that light but that strong is insane

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sure you can.

i do.

im a big believer in the 'overtraining is mental' thing.

just do it right and learn to listen to your body.

i workout when i want to. if my body says take a day off, i take a day off.

for focus on weight loss i'd suggest circuits. lots of compound movements, keep your heart rate up. no rest in between exercises.

oh, and lots of jumping jacks/jump rope.

Yup, this! I alternate hard and soft workouts, but if i feel too tired/sore i'll take a break day. I'm too hyper to only exercise 3 times a week!

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