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Just finished Orson Scott Card's The Lost Gate. It's a slow-burn (read as: pacing problems), though I expect the sequels might be better since all of the set-up work is done.

 

Kylie Chan's Dark Serpent has the same issues, but possibly because I picked up Book 6 in the series instead of starting at the beginning. I picked up the book expecting epic kung-fu battles and there's way more "inner life of the protagonists" than I was expecting.

"If you would improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid." - Epictetus

"You just gotta listen to your body, unless it's saying anything about stopping, pain, your joints, or needing water."

Level 20 Pilgrim (Adventurer 7, Assassin 3, Druid 2, Monk 10, Ranger 5, Rebel 9, Scout 10, Warrior 4)

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The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.

 

Today I am starting the Dark Tower series by Stephen King. I haven't read it before, but it has been repeatedly recommended to me. It is a series of significance for my partner, so I am going to read it. I am nervous about it for some reason, there is a heaviness to it in my mind that I can't quite figure out. We will see how it goes.

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 halfling rogue ⋆ level 4

my challenges: 1 2 3 4 5 6  my character  my quest

when it rains, look for rainbows; when it is dark, look for stars

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I ended up dropping Dark Serpent, which is a shame since I really wanted to like that book. I may have to find something earlier in the series and start from there.

Currently reading A Tale of Two Subs, which is about a submarine disaster during WWII. The author does a great job of conveying the psychological terror the sailors must have been going through, so I have to read it in small doses.

"If you would improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid." - Epictetus

"You just gotta listen to your body, unless it's saying anything about stopping, pain, your joints, or needing water."

Level 20 Pilgrim (Adventurer 7, Assassin 3, Druid 2, Monk 10, Ranger 5, Rebel 9, Scout 10, Warrior 4)

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I just finished "The Monster Baru Cormorant", which was very interesting. Stylewise it felt similar to the first book (The Traitor Baru Cormorant) but also suuuuper different, I'm interested to see how the cycle progresses in book 3

 

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I just finished a dark romance called Bought by the Beast by Lexi Heart, which I loved! I plan on reading the Game of Thrones series next, now that the show has ended. I've only read the first 2 books prior, so I really want to see how the book and TV series differs as the story progresses. 
They're definitely super different! But we still have 2 books to go before the story finishes there

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2 books? I thought he only had 1 more left to go?! Jeez, I remember starting those books over 15 years ago. Crazy. 
Right? Yep, there's one more after Winds of Winter called A Dream of Spring

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Working my way through the Lewis & Clark expedition. A bit of a slog since about half of each page is foot-notes by the editor. By and large I'm skipping over the footnotes and just reading the journal entries.

"If you would improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid." - Epictetus

"You just gotta listen to your body, unless it's saying anything about stopping, pain, your joints, or needing water."

Level 20 Pilgrim (Adventurer 7, Assassin 3, Druid 2, Monk 10, Ranger 5, Rebel 9, Scout 10, Warrior 4)

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Bruce Dickinson autobiography. Next in line is "Humans: A Brief History of How We F*cked It All Up"

I absolutely CAN run on caffeine and hatred. But only with a dash of milk.

Challenges' status: 

Spoiler

Not gonna Challenge anymore for now. I took Steve's words and started thinking in days and years. Challenges are just short-term distractions. 

 

#16 | #15 (Xmas mini) |  #14 | #13 | #12 | #11 | #10 | #9 | #8 | #7 | #6 | #5 | #4 | #3 | #2 | #1

 

Other activities: Bike build

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Today I read and finished "The Miracle Morning".

Yes, I did it in a day,  but this is due to this book being very short.

 

I posted a 5 week challenge in this forum a few months ago but I have somehow lost track. This book tipped me over the edge to start using this website again, especially for accountability for waking up early. I'm really looking forward to starting (and sticking to!!) a new habit and to share my journey with y'all!

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- - respawned just in time for 2020 -- 

 

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The Complete Fiction Of H. P. Lovecraft

 

A few years back I  started playing the board game Arkham Horror. I ended up collecting all of the expansions and when I am feeling ambitious I'll play the complete game. Over time the play has gotten to feel a little mechanical, sort of like "if this happens then do this" automatic responses. Reading the stories that inspired the game will help add context and some imagination to what is happening in the game.

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The 4-Hour Workweek - Timothy Ferris

 

I'm reading this at the same time as "The Complete Fiction Of H. P. Lovecraft" (above). Both books are comprised of short stories (Lovecraft) or distinct chapters (Ferris) so I can jump back and forth.

 

With working from home because of the current world crisis (Covid-19 for any alien archaeologists  that may be reading this in the distant future as they excavate this then lifeless planet and are wondering why some houses have a decade's worth of dusty toilet paper) I wanted to be able to capitalize on work efficiency. I am a software designer by profession so for automation I already use Powershell, Python, Bash, and a myriad of whatever else will get the job done (it's good to have a well-stocked tool box, but there is always room for more!). But looking at my job from just a programmer's view is too narrow, I want to get other perspectives that may help with my both current job and any other non-programming jobs I run up against.

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Currently reading:

On the road - Jack Kerouac

Logic Pro x for dummies - Graham English

 

I found the first one looking for a real good adventure story. Eight chapters in my craving is satisfied. I love the characters and the setting.

 

Ive had the second one in my library for quite some time now. I’ve been meaning to *critically* read it for a while. I try to read and take notes on a chapter a day :)))

 

Happy readying everybody!

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Finished "The 4-Hour Workweek". It was interesting to read his take on making his life easier, but it didn't really fit my current life and work.

 

I'm jumping to two O'Reilly cookbooks (these books cover things like programming languages). For anyone that hasn't used an O'Reilly cookbook, each chapter covers a topic, and these chapters are broken into small sections where each problem and solution is given a chapter number followed by the problem number. For instance, chapter 10 in the Powershell book noted below is "Structured Files". Section 10.1 is "Access Information in an XML File". And that section states a problem, and then has a solution(s) with examples, some discussion notes, and a "see also" section. I highly recommend the O'Reilly books for learning new programming/scripting.

 

"Windows Powershell Cookbook" - Lee Holmes. I use Powershell a lot at work for automating tasks and data analysis. But what I know is based on the current need; when something comes up I research that specific need and build scripts accordingly. Don't get me wrong, the concepts I pick up building these spur of the moment solutions come in handy for future issues, but it is time to know and understand the building blocks.

 

"R Cookbook" - Paul Teetor. Again, I use R a lot at work for data analysis. I recently learned just enough to convert 15 years of monthly CSV files and text-based data (scraped from Notepad) into pie and bar graph PNG files that are now used in a template PHP file to generate monthly Intranet web pages. This has since been automated and saves a number of people a lot of time each month. I was impressed with R's capabilities, and again it is time to know and understand the building blocks.

 

And the best part? Both scripting environments are free! If you have a Windows computer, you have Powershell. And R is a free download. I'm going to jump back and forth between the books and attempt to do at least five to ten problems in each book per day, typing the problems and examples and making notes in the scripts as I go.

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