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obax - Infiltration: Stage 1, Subsection 1.7(ii)


obax

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It definitely is, especially when it's an activity that I'm not familiar with or with something that really matters to me. When I think about all the possibilities, I tend to focus on the things that could go wrong. If things are going right, I don't really need to plan ahead, I just need to ride along, but if things go wrong I need to know ahead of time what I'm going to do in each situation. It's not a step-by-step escape plan for each and every possibility, but it helps me to think about how each wrong thing that might happen will make me feel, and how I might react, and what I could do to turn it around. I REALLY don't like surprises. It also helps me to talk it out, or in this case, type it out. I feel like these challenge threads become a bit of a sounding board for me sometimes.

 

I can get carried away thinking about all the possible reactions to my actions, and on and on, but I'm usually pretty good at recognizing when I'm getting carried away and stopping myself. My mother gives me a hard time about this all the time, but it really does settle my mind and allow me to go into whatever activity it is with a calm and reasoned attitude. I think it's all part of being a hardcore introvert, a defense mechanism against the unexpected. That way of thinking tends to take over with everything I do, even if it's something that doesn't really matter. It's just how my brain works.

 

I do appreciate the 'jump off the cliff' types, though, I need some of those in my life to give me a push now and then. And I will, eventually, jump off that cliff too, I just won't do it until I have a plan for what to do while I'm falling.

Dare mighty thingsCurrent Challenge

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Note on the negatives: I've noticed that I'm consistently able to lower myself slowly and in control until the very end, just before I straighten my arms, and then it's pretty much a drop. I tried pulling myself up today just to see what happened, and I wasn't able to get anywhere. I have a feeling that whatever muscles are supposed to be working right at the start of a pull-up (ie. at the end of a negative) are my weak point. I'll just have to keep workin' on it...

 

When you are lowering to the bottom of the movement, you want to keep your shoulders packed and your body tight.  Don't noodle it at the bottom.  Check out this post over at Beast Skills. About 1/4 of the way down the page under the title "Dangers" he talks about proper shoulder positioning during a pull-up. Make sure that you are keeping your shoulders tight.  Relaxing at the bottom of the movement will make pulling up harder AND will damage your shoulders.

Wolverine

Level X Mutant

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Thanks for that, Wolverine. I was a bit worried about hurting my shoulders. It's not much of a drop and I haven't felt it in my shoulders yet, but I will certainly focus on that the next time I do it. I don't think I'm relaxing, but I could be a bit.

Dare mighty thingsCurrent Challenge

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On the flip side, you can start from a dead hang, do a relatively slow increase in tension until your elbows just start to bend, and then hold it until you're blown.  This should work the end of your negative without the sudden drop at the end.  Kind of like doing a static contraction at the bottom of your range of movement.  It will also give you controlled entry into Wolverine's tight body position.  Just a thought...

 

About the "over thinking"...all kinds of good things come from it so long as you get in the habit of executing the task when the contingency planning reaches the point of diminishing returns.  Now I'm going to lead you down the Dark Side; you can really organize this process.  The powers that be once made me the Battalion Safety Officer (Hah!)  and I had to study up on Composite Risk Management.  Of course it was doomed from the outset, but I learned to sound like I had "drank the kool-aid".  Try these steps and check out these references:

 

 

The Steps
  • Step 1 - Identify hazards. 
  • Step 2 - Assess hazards to determine risk. 
  • Step 3 - Develop controls and make risk decisions. 
  • Step 4 - Implement controls. 
  • Step 5 - Supervise and evaluate.

References

Army Regulation 385-10 - The Army Safety Program

ARCENT Regulation 385-10 - USARCENT Safety Program

Department of the Army Pamphlet 385-30 - Mishap Risk Management

ATP 5.19 Risk Management

There's a whole science behind risk mitigation that's been developing since the beginning of the industrial revolution, and you seem to be a natural.  Who knows, there might be a future in it for you (not in the Army though, but maybe as a training officer when you're a Cop).

Cro Magnon Assassin
 

 

 

"Hold my beer and watch this..."

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That's actually a pretty good summing-up of how my brain naturally works. I tend to go through life as if it's a giant science experiment with me as the only test subject, so when the 'supervise and evaluate' portion goes sideways, I reassess and reform my controls (hypothesis) and try again.

 

Lately I've been getting to the 'jump of the cliff, already!' point much more often than I have in the past. I'm taking this as a positive. I don't know what it was that got me there, but I'm just goin' with it. I'm hoping this combined with my natural risk-assessment ability (and proper training, which I have yet ot experience in a job) will serve me well when I'm actually a cop.

 

Just out of curiosity, why not in the Army?

Dare mighty thingsCurrent Challenge

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The majority of people who try out the military find it doesn't suit them and go on to better things once their obligation is over.  Its all about molding you into something very different from the individual that your began as.  Unless you have very strong motivators that point you to the military its always better to choose a civilian option.  Personally, I'm in it for the long haul, but I drank the kool-aid years ago:)

Cro Magnon Assassin
 

 

 

"Hold my beer and watch this..."

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Police departments also have a need for safety/contingency planners.  Lots of regulations that need to be adhered to.  Also lots of types of crises that need advance planning to mitigate.  Finally, public events usually require a police presence, just in case, and this needs detail oriented people who have a broad imagination and are problem solvers to plan and organize.  Of course  all cops begin on patrol.

Cro Magnon Assassin
 

 

 

"Hold my beer and watch this..."

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 Of course  all cops begin on patrol.

 

That's actually what I'm looking forward to. More chance to interact with people, some of whom need to be knocked down a peg (I'm looking at you, bikers who don't obey the rules of the road!) and some who need a hand up. It weirds me out to think of it, since I generally don't like people that much...

 

Today's Workout:

 

I'm about to go for a run. Just the short route again, the weather is still damp and cold and nasty and I'd rather curl up in a blanket than go outside again, but at least the gale-force winds have subsided and it's no longer raining ice from the sky. I'll post my time after.

 

More importantly, I'm now the proud owner of a shiny new pair of rock climbing shoes!! It took a lot of trial and error (and patience on the part of the guy helping me) to find the pair that weren't painful to wear, but I found 'em. I had a nicely-timed 'We're Sorry You're Poor' cheque from the government that paid for them, with enough left over for a cheap chalk bag and some chalk to go in it. So yay! I might even go test them out tonight!!

Dare mighty thingsCurrent Challenge

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Climbing shoes are the biggest part of the investment, you have done well:)  You also have the chalk bag, what about a harness?

 

Beware of the people yo will be interacting with, you'll spend 90% of your time with the bottom 10%.  It can make you cynical.  Look at me...

Cro Magnon Assassin
 

 

 

"Hold my beer and watch this..."

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I'm already pretty cynical, so I should fit right in. I'm also a hopeless optimist, I've seen a lot of shit working with wildlife and domestic animals, much of it human-induced, and I have yet to lose my idealist spirit (my personal life-view is that we're all doomed, but there's always hope). It's the bottom 10% I want to work with, because there might be one in there somewhere who's ready to make a change, and if I can be the hand up that they need to get themselves on a new track, then I'll consider that to be the ultimate success. I have no illusions that I'll be able to help everyone I come in contact with, I'm fully prepared to have most people be unhappy to see me, but I will also be prepared for the opposite if I'm lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time.

 

I firmly believe that most people who get involved with the police (in a negative way) are good people who got themselves into a bad situation. That's not to say it's not their fault, a lot of time it is and they need to own up to that (though I acknowledge that there are a whole host of factors that go into this sort of thing). While I admittedly don't actually know this, I do feel like there are some cops out there who see the people they deal with/arrest as bad people, or somehow as 'less than'. I refuse to think that way, though I freely admit that I can't really form a proper opinion on this until I've done the job for a while. If anyone can hold on to their idealism, though, it's me, through sheer stubbornness, if nothing else.

 

I just hope I can find some like-minded people on whatever force I end up serving with. All that will be much harder to maintain if I'm all by my lonesome.

 

Also, no harness because A) I ran out of money, and B) I don't have a regular climbing partner (restricting me to bouldering most of the time), and am happy to rent a harness from the gym on the rare occasion that I'll need one. It'll be a while yet before I feel confident enough to try outdoor climbing, assuming I can find someone to belay me. When I get closer to that point (or when I get the next government cheque, whichever comes first) I'll invest in a harness.

Dare mighty thingsCurrent Challenge

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Oh, also, since I said I'd post my running time: 2k in 10:40. Not bad, considering the crummy weather and the fact that I actually thought I'd puke by the end. I was very tight today, I really gotta get back on that there stretchin' train......

Dare mighty thingsCurrent Challenge

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