Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I filmed myself doing some back squats so I could check my form. Overall, I think it's pretty good except that I round a bit in my back as I drop below parallel in the squat. Also I could make less of a 'pain face' in the later sets. Any feedback is welcome :)

 

 

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Z_qzfEKELIA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Link to comment

Not bad. Knees wobble a lil bit on the decent. I'd like to see a bit more control there (eg don't sink into the hole as fast as you can). 

 

Doing a bit of a butt wink but it isn't terrible. Make sure you stretch your hamstrings and you should eliminate most of it. Weight seems a bit light. Continue your progress and post a video when you get closer to your failing point or when it really becomes difficult. This'll show a lot more technique problems. 

 

 

 

Also, you are a tall lanky lifter. As a fellow tall lanky lifter I approve :) Keep on keepin' on 

"Pull the bar like you're ripping the head off a god-damned lion" - Donny Shankle

Link to comment

Yeah, I have pretty long legs. I friend of mine said that body type tends to influence what lifts you excel at. For example, he's a short, buffy type guy and he is relatively better at squatting than deadlifting (off course his deadlift is still heavier than his back squat, but compared to me, a tall lanky lifter, my gap between deadlift and squat is larger because my body has advantages for deadlifts).

Do you also find your deadlift is accelerating faster than squat (and perhaps the being lanky disadvantage in bench press)?
 

I know I could probably do heavier weight, but I really want to focus on the form and not start tapping my back to complete the final reps. The main reason I'm keeping the weight this low is to not get as much technique problems. I'd rather do a better form on lower weight, than compromise form and technique and risk injury for the sake of a new PR. 
My hamstrings are horribly short and my hips are kinda tight too (I think I lack external rotation more than flexion), but I'm doing them Kelly Starrett mobility drills to address those issues.

What do you suggest for improving hamstrings, I currently just lay one of the legs on a bench or up against a doorpost or lay on the floor and wrap a flex band and stretch them.

I will go for 60 kg next time I'm doing back squats (which I've done before, but with feet at 30 degree angle out and not with feet straight) and try to focus on lowering into the squat slower.

Thank you for the feedback.

Link to comment

Yeah, DLs for me are insanely easy. As noted by my forum title I am the reigning deadlifting champ from the last virtual lifting comp. :) I've actually measured the distances and my DL range of motion from floor to full lockout is 24 inches. My range of motion for overhead press and bench is 26 inches. Stupid lanky arms are a mechanical disadvantage. My deadlift did increase much faster than my squat at the beginning. There was a gap of like 180lbs at one point. But I've found the best way to continue to increase my deadlift is to squat more. If you can get your squat within 100lbs or so of your DL you'll be good. As for bench, pssh, I barely have a bodyweight bench press after years of lifting. I hate the bench so I don't do it. 

 

 

Sounds like you know everything you need to work on. Can't wait to see how you progress.

"Pull the bar like you're ripping the head off a god-damned lion" - Donny Shankle

Link to comment

One thing of note, is that Butt wink is fairly common and as Bigm said, yours isn't even that bad. What's even more of note, is that at lighter weights it's even more common and harder to prevent. Your body will do a much better job of bracing itself when the weight gets a little bit heavier.

 

I've recently restarted all my weights with starting strength, starting squat at 95lbs, and adding 10lbs per workout. It's almost impossible for me to control at 95lbs but three workouts in at 115, I can already tell it's diminishing. Taking a big breath and holding it helps to brace better as well. Oh, lastly, really focus on shoving those knees out, that'll help with the back rounding even more.

"I've torn a hamstring tendon and re-injured my knee, lower back, and upper back while doing yoga. Don't get me started on shin splints. You're damned if you do and you're damned if you don't, so might as well be strong." - Some guy on the SS forums.

"Heavy is dangerous, but light is no fun." - Mark Rippetoe

"Squats are a good assistance to bring up your curl, as a bonus you can do your squats while your are still in the curl rack." - SJB

 

Link to comment

@Bolson

Aaah. yeah, I noticed that aswell that the more weight you put on your back than it does become easier to brace and get in the right position because it also changes the center of your mass as compared to a bodyweight air squat.

 

@bigm14
I had a lot of stalling on my bench press as well but I do want to get it to improve. That probably has to do with the long arms and the fact that I always train alone and without a spotter and benching is scary (even though I'm overcoming the fear). I'm currently at 3x8 60kg and will soon try more.
 

Link to comment

One other thing I noticed, probably won't help you squat more, but your wrists are curled under the bar. Keep them on top and drive your elbows back. Puts the bar on a pad of muscle instead of your shoulder blades. Makes it more comfortable to begin with, but also helps keep full body tension.

"I've torn a hamstring tendon and re-injured my knee, lower back, and upper back while doing yoga. Don't get me started on shin splints. You're damned if you do and you're damned if you don't, so might as well be strong." - Some guy on the SS forums.

"Heavy is dangerous, but light is no fun." - Mark Rippetoe

"Squats are a good assistance to bring up your curl, as a bonus you can do your squats while your are still in the curl rack." - SJB

 

Link to comment

All of the above are good tips, you're squat form isn't half bad, but like was said, form issues crop up when you actually start to get close to max weights. Do you have a rack? And for bench, just ask for a spot, people are typically more than happy to help.

Massrandir, Barkûn, Swolórin, The Whey Pilgrim
500 / 330 / 625
Challenges: 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 31 32 34 35 36 39 41 42 45 46 47 48 49 Current Challenge
"No citizen has a right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. What a disgrace it is for a man to grow old without ever seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable. " ~ Socrates
"Friends don't let friends squat high." ~ Chad Wesley Smith
"It's a dangerous business, Brodo, squatting to the floor. You step into the rack, and if you don't keep your form, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to." ~ Gainsdalf

Link to comment

Thanks for the grip tip, I'll adjust and re-test next time :)

 

There is a rack at the gym, but I sort of like to deadlift and press it overhead and put it in place, but I understand the limitations in terms of adding extra weight, that will be hard to press overhead. Nonetheless, I do not want to be sacrificing form for additional weight. I can clearly feel like my muscle has received a very good stimulus from this work-out, I also know this from checking my the pulse in my neck after the second set (which may be visible in the sped up section of the video). I love this so much about deadlifts and squats, they give the entire system a shocker and ramp up the cardiovascular system. I think adding a rack and substantial amounts of weight will do more harm than good. I am also not a very big fan of doing max single reps. I think the body get's a much better stimulus from a few sets of 5 to 8 reps on a hard load than a single max rep at a very hard load. I'm planning on just adding 5 kg whenever I succeed at 3x8 on decent form. I'm hoping my overhead press will progress in line with this so I can continue to press it overhead and placing it on the back. If at some point I can't press a load that I can back squat with proper form for 3 sets of 8 reps, I will head to the rack. I am not in a hurry to ramp up them numbers and as long as my body get's a good stimulus for building strength that's the most important thing for me.

Link to comment

Thanks for the grip tip, I'll adjust and re-test next time :)

 

There is a rack at the gym, but I sort of like to deadlift and press it overhead and put it in place, but I understand the limitations in terms of adding extra weight, that will be hard to press overhead. Nonetheless, I do not want to be sacrificing form for additional weight. I can clearly feel like my muscle has received a very good stimulus from this work-out, I also know this from checking my the pulse in my neck after the second set (which may be visible in the sped up section of the video). I love this so much about deadlifts and squats, they give the entire system a shocker and ramp up the cardiovascular system. I think adding a rack and substantial amounts of weight will do more harm than good. I am also not a very big fan of doing max single reps. I think the body get's a much better stimulus from a few sets of 5 to 8 reps on a hard load than a single max rep at a very hard load. I'm planning on just adding 5 kg whenever I succeed at 3x8 on decent form. I'm hoping my overhead press will progress in line with this so I can continue to press it overhead and placing it on the back. If at some point I can't press a load that I can back squat with proper form for 3 sets of 8 reps, I will head to the rack. I am not in a hurry to ramp up them numbers and as long as my body get's a good stimulus for building strength that's the most important thing for me.

 

To each his own, but to be honest you're going to start running into that limitation pretty quickly. The Squat should be a lift that really jumps up pretty quick. How much weight were you doing there? For reference, a 1xBW OHP is very respectable. a 1xBW Squat isn't. But like I said, to each his own. If you want to get stronger, you're going to have to add weight. Doing 100lb squats over and over is a recipe for not much. You'll feel it for a week or two, then you'll adapt very quickly.

 

Also, while it is cool to clean and press then squat it. You really run into some safety issues if you can't safely press it and lower it gently. There's no need to be a hero. You should be squatting at least 150lbs for reps, and it doesn't look like you're pressing that. Isn't that only a 5 or 6ft bar? Probably 120lbs total?

"I've torn a hamstring tendon and re-injured my knee, lower back, and upper back while doing yoga. Don't get me started on shin splints. You're damned if you do and you're damned if you don't, so might as well be strong." - Some guy on the SS forums.

"Heavy is dangerous, but light is no fun." - Mark Rippetoe

"Squats are a good assistance to bring up your curl, as a bonus you can do your squats while your are still in the curl rack." - SJB

 

Link to comment

I am unsure about raising the weight. I'm really focussing on solid form right now and I feel like when I raise the weight to fast I'm going to start making form errors which is not helpful. What's the point in lifting more weight if you do it in a mediocre or poor way?
Sure, it may look cool on the scoreboard, but I think I would not be doing my body a favor by sacrficing form for weight on the bar. I do gradually increase the weight whenever I get a solid 3x8 reps in proper form on each lift.
Either I'm just really weak in comparison to other people or other people are more willing to sacrifice form. To be honest, it doesn't matter that much to me, because I think it's not about comparing myself to others, but comparing myself with where I come from on a day-to-day, week-to-week, month-to-month, year-to-year basis.

Feel free to suggest that maybe I am being a bit to cautious and conservative in raising the weight, maybe I'm wrong, but I'm just listening to my body and paying a lot of attention in perfecting form (which is not even near perfect to begin with due to some mobility restrictions I'm also improving concurrently).

Also, I can feel my heart pounding in my throat after every set of deadlifts and squats, I can usually feel my legs being worked the next day and I haven't run into any injury so I take that as a good sign.
But perhaps I am not pushing myself hard enough into the quantity of weight. Maybe I'll try a few reps of much heavier squats and deadlifts just to check it out.

Link to comment

You're making the right call. One of the progressions we run is as follows. Select a weight you know you can do for 8 reps. Perform each set and try to hit 12 reps, stopping a rep before you feel like your form will break. Do this for each set. If you hit a full 3x12 increase the load 2-3 kgs (or 5%) and do the same thing the following week. If you fail to hit twelve reps for all three sets repeat the weight the following week. Continue repeating until you nail the 3x12. That should ensure you're good for at least a solid 3x8 after the increase. This will work well for squats and pressing but I would keep the dead lifts in the 5-8 rep range and not stress about them too much. The squatting will drive the dead lift and you can progress the dead lift weight a lot like you are now, when it gets too easy. 

Eat. Sleep. High bar squat. | Strength is a skill, refine it.
Follow my Weightlifting team's antics: Instagram | Facebook | Youtube
Looking for a strength program? Check out The Danger Method and remember to do your damn abs

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

New here? Please check out our Privacy Policy and Community Guidelines