• Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

chairohkey

The Training Yard: Where We Get Our Learn On

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, Aynon13 said:

Alright warriors, can I ask some questions about these challenges.

1) does every person create their own

2) is it limited to only 4 weeks?

3) are there required challenges to complete before being accepted in the warrior class?

I thought I had more....lol....I dont. 

 

1) Everyone does create their own challenge. The thread title typically starts with your username so that they are easy to sort through. 

2) Each is 4 weeks with a 1 week break in between. We typically refer to that week as the "Zero Week" before the next 4 weeks start. Some people don't take that break so their challenges are really more like 5 weeks.

2a) A new part of the forum is created at the end of each challenge to post your next challenge in. It will have the dates in the title, i.e. "Current Challenge - July 17 to August 13". 

2b) Some people do a Challenge and some people do a Battle Log, some people do both. A Battle Log is a thread with ongoing posts that never ends, and doesn't necessarily focus on specific goals. Whereas your 4 week challenge outlines goals that you have for those 4 weeks. There is a separate part of the forum for Battle Logs. 

3) Once you have completed one challenge as part of the Rebels you typically join your class (in this case warriors) after that. But I don't think anyone stops someone if they want to join their class's challenge forum without doing a Rebel class challenge. You do already have 68 posts. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Taddea Zhaan thank you for the clarity....68 posts isnt that many...lol im a curious beast....no but really I just felt a need to ask. Being still new the more active I am the better I stay on track. I do have a battle log. I am currently putting together my first change and will be jumping in with both feet and one mace. I probably will just do a five week due to one of my goals will and is my biggest will take the longest to accomplish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2c) Some people just keep repeating the same 4 week challenge over and over which is also fine. Because the challenge threads seem to get more outside participation than battle logs. :)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, miss_marissa said:

2c) Some people just keep repeating the same 4 week challenge over and over which is also fine. Because the challenge threads seem to get more outside participation than battle logs. :)

@miss_marissa two things 1 awesome shirt....2 I dont plan on doing the same challenge over again. I may repeat some things being my one goal is to quit smoking....I posted my challenge in my battle log lol I couldnt help it...kind of excited, and my a.d.d kicked in and I couldnt wait.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Taddea Zhaan said:

This one? 

"Nutrient timing revisited: is there a post-exercise anabolic window?"

http://jissn.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1550-2783-10-5

 the other link didn't work for me for some reason.

 

just wanted to throw that out. im off to go read the article :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Volki said:

This one? 

"Nutrient timing revisited: is there a post-exercise anabolic window?"

http://jissn.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1550-2783-10-5

 the other link didn't work for me for some reason.

 

just wanted to throw that out. im off to go read the article :D

 

It wasn't meant to be a link to a specific article. It is supposed to go to the whole list of published journal articles where Brad Shoenfeld, PhD is a (co)author. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep getting a recurring blister deep in the first pad of my right ring finger; first one up from the palm, that is. It comes from deadlifting, but I think it's exacerbated by all pulling exercises, really. Short of sticking a needle in my finger once a week to pop the thing (which I understand is a Bad Idea), anyone have some advice for how to avoid this and/or get a callus to form faster so it's a non-issue? Or do I just need to suck it up?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Barghest said:

I keep getting a recurring blister deep in the first pad of my right ring finger; first one up from the palm, that is. It comes from deadlifting, but I think it's exacerbated by all pulling exercises, really. Short of sticking a needle in my finger once a week to pop the thing (which I understand is a Bad Idea), anyone have some advice for how to avoid this and/or get a callus to form faster so it's a non-issue? Or do I just need to suck it up?

Im not sure if this correct advice but I just do my best to ignore it. What I have done in the past is wear gloves. The gloves helped with the rubbing on my palms when I was doing pullups. Maybe you could try alternating with the gloves and without until a callous can be built up. Good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, bar is moving in your hand, causing the blister. With the correct grip, there is no movement, and no blister.

 

The odd part is that it's occurring in that first segment of the finger. Usually we see it in the pad at the top of the palm. Are you closing your hand fully around the bar? Can you take a picture of your grip, or have someone else take it, and post it so we can figure out a correction?

 

The problem with adding gloves on deadlifts is that they make your grip on the bar weaker, since the effectively make the bar "bigger" with the extra layer of material between your hand and the bar.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, wells101 said:

Hey, what do i do if i want to start again after falling (very) hard off the horse?

Drop the weight significantly from where you left off, say 20-30%, but then progress way faster than before I be back up to speed in 2-4 weeks depending on how advanced you were. Beware, the beginner DOMs come back with a vengeance for the first week or two. This is my greatest motivator for making sure I squat at least once a week, preferably twice, even when I'm slacking.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/1/2016 at 4:20 PM, Barghest said:

I keep getting a recurring blister deep in the first pad of my right ring finger; first one up from the palm, that is. It comes from deadlifting, but I think it's exacerbated by all pulling exercises, really. Short of sticking a needle in my finger once a week to pop the thing (which I understand is a Bad Idea), anyone have some advice for how to avoid this and/or get a callus to form faster so it's a non-issue? Or do I just need to suck it up?

 

 

Hey there, I'm new to this group but have been training and and  off for over a year but started seriously this year.  

 

The blister is most likely there from the bar rotating in your hands
Don't pop it.  If you need to take some time off or tape it.  I wouldn't recommend gloves.  Would recommend either chalk, alternating grip or lifting straps.

 

When I do a lot of pulling like snatch/clean complexes or pulls i just tape over the calluses for a couple of days because they feel raw AF.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Gainsdalf the Whey said:

Drop the weight significantly from where you left off, say 20-30%, but then progress way faster than before I be back up to speed in 2-4 weeks depending on how advanced you were. Beware, the beginner DOMs come back with a vengeance for the first week or two. This is my greatest motivator for making sure I squat at least once a week, preferably twice, even when I'm slacking.

 

The DOMs, OMG the DOMs.  I had a hip flexor strain so the physio said no squats - that lasted 2 months.
Even though I was still deadlifting and doing power variants of the oly lifts my first volume day on squats 5x5 at 90kgs (down from 132.5 before injury) brought me back to when i first started lifting.  
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, my wife and I discovered this affect when we both stopped lifting for a month the first time around (I had some tightness in my low back that really worried me but physiology now assures me isnit spine damage, and my wife had bronchitis) so when I came back from 6 weeks off due to surgery, I seriously dropped the weight (I think I did like 55-60% of my normal working weight) and still suffered. Then we hit a nice combination after coming back from our Scotland holiday, went from 5x5 to 3x3 at around 65-70% and increased the weight and volume each session until we were back up to speed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, that's good to know.  I actually did just cardio yesterday, about 30 minutes on a stationary bike, and for some reason (and I know I'm sensitive to this so i'm already taking a stupid amount of precautions) I experienced symptoms of rhabdomyalosis (because apparently there was resistance on the bike I didn't ask for) and got to take a trip to urgent care at 11:30 last night.  THAT was fun...  Thanks for the advice, which i'm going to amend with "Don't be a f***ing dumb***, Wells" becuase clearly that's something I need to say to myself a lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎10‎/‎4‎/‎2016 at 0:12 PM, Gainsdalf the Whey said:

Yep, bar is moving in your hand, causing the blister. With the correct grip, there is no movement, and no blister.

 

The odd part is that it's occurring in that first segment of the finger. Usually we see it in the pad at the top of the palm. Are you closing your hand fully around the bar? Can you take a picture of your grip, or have someone else take it, and post it so we can figure out a correction?

 

The problem with adding gloves on deadlifts is that they make your grip on the bar weaker, since the effectively make the bar "bigger" with the extra layer of material between your hand and the bar.

 

 This is what I'm a little confused about, I guess. I've been using an alternating grip (left hand under, right hand over on heavy weight, switched on lower weight). I also get blisters in the pad at the top of the palm, but this blister is newer. I think I'm closing my hand fully around the bar, but sometimes I find my grip slipping because I have extremely sweaty hands. I'll try to get a picture taken; usually I'm at the gym alone, but maybe I can set the timer on the camera or something.

 

I have used gloves before, but the first pair started to gather into a little clump that would poke right into my finger joint, and the stitching fell apart on the other pair within about six months of purchase, so I don't think they'd help anyway. I'm open to using chalk, but would prefer liquid chalk because my gym doesn't allow it (though they only enforce this with people who aren't super muscular; the big dudes are apparently allowed to use chalk).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chalk is your friend.  Also, rather than a picture, video is more helpful and easier.  You can then upload it to youtube and trim/edit it.  I don't know about alternating grip, but on double overhang grip for deadlifts, I have to make sure I touch the bar first with the palmar digital crease first and then wrap my fingers.  That keeps the pads at the top of the palm above the bar.  If I'm going lift deadlifts or pendlay rows, I touch with the distal palmar crease first which puts the pads a little under the bar.  On the lighter loads, the bar won't shift at all so this the natural position.  On the heavy deadlifts, the bar will shift a bit into my fingers which would shear load the pads if they were below the bar.  My point being how you grab the bar can impact how the load is going to push on the skin.

374.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back Squat question:

 

First of all, my goal is to achieve general, overall strength, with no competitions. I might do powerlifting but again, only for strength/power development to help my aging, 56yo body keep fit now and into the future. My other goal is to improve my strength for next year's cycling season.

 

With that in mind, I have done some research and the consensus appears to be that I should be trying to do ass-to-grass squats where possible (but at the same time, not overdoing it and damaging my body). For the most part, I'm pretty good with regard to depth: with the weight on my shoulders (currently, only 85lb but hoping to double that at some point), I'm able to get my calves and hamstrings to touch. I also have been doing them fairly slowly, 4-5 seconds down and 4-5 seconds up.

 

My question is about the fact that I also pause at the bottom for about 2-3 seconds and even though my weight is not high, it requires a fair bit of effort to start back up. I'm wondering if I should be pausing or just, as soon as calves/hamstrings touch, reverse the direction of movement and head on up. Or maybe, when I get to the bottom, I'm "sitting" on my muscles and perhaps relaxing them, then having to engage them again for the movement upwards.

 

Should I pause? Is the sitting on my muscles an issue?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, FamilyBeer said:

Should I pause? Is the sitting on my muscles an issue?

 

It's not an issue. Paused squats are a thing, and they help increase strength by forcing the posterior chain to do more work in the hole. You could even stay down there longer to ensure the stretch reflex is entirely gone before pushing back up. It will definitely do the job.

 

Lifters often USE the stretch reflex (the kinda "bounce" at the bottom of the squat) to help lift more weight, so it's good for pushing bigger numbers. Paused squats will definitely feel harder, even at lighter weights.

 

If you're feeling spry, you could always try both to feel the difference.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, FamilyBeer said:

Back Squat question:

 

First of all, my goal is to achieve general, overall strength, with no competitions. I might do powerlifting but again, only for strength/power development to help my aging, 56yo body keep fit now and into the future. My other goal is to improve my strength for next year's cycling season.

 

With that in mind, I have done some research and the consensus appears to be that I should be trying to do ass-to-grass squats where possible (but at the same time, not overdoing it and damaging my body). For the most part, I'm pretty good with regard to depth: with the weight on my shoulders (currently, only 85lb but hoping to double that at some point), I'm able to get my calves and hamstrings to touch. I also have been doing them fairly slowly, 4-5 seconds down and 4-5 seconds up.

 

My question is about the fact that I also pause at the bottom for about 2-3 seconds and even though my weight is not high, it requires a fair bit of effort to start back up. I'm wondering if I should be pausing or just, as soon as calves/hamstrings touch, reverse the direction of movement and head on up. Or maybe, when I get to the bottom, I'm "sitting" on my muscles and perhaps relaxing them, then having to engage them again for the movement upwards.

 

Should I pause? Is the sitting on my muscles an issue?

Nothing should be relaxing at the bottom, ever. You want to strive to keep everything super tight.

 

That said, if you are not training for powerlifting, pause squats probably are not your best option. Their main use is to  specifically to train your body to be stronger in the "bounce" out of the bottom to make sure that when you're lifting the heaviest load, you're starting back up in the best way possible. They're also used to train you to be confident under weights when you're that low so you don't panic under heavy loads. Neither of these apply to general strength training, especially for cycling where you're most concerned with the top half of the squat for carry over strength to your sport as that's the range of motion your legs go through on the bike.

 

Now, as for the slow up and slow down, that's not the best for sport specific power either. In cycling, your legs are moving quickly. This type of training is focusing on Time Under Tension, or TUT, and is used for increased hypertophy, or size gains. Most of the time, you get the most sport carry over from strength training by moving at similar speeds to your sport. I'm not saying go with pure explosive lifting, but you want to be going down and back up at about a second each. The biggest thing you want to focus on is driving that bar up as hard and fast as possible on the way up, no matter how heavy or light it is.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, FamilyBeer said:

But I guess I should ensure that, just because I'm settled on my haunches, that I shouldn't relax my muscles?

 

Indeed! Stay tight!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now