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chairohkey

The Training Yard: Where We Get Our Learn On

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I'll cosign the foam roller thought.

 

I get excited when it's time to foam roll.  The sweet pain of working out the spots in need gets me fired up to lift for the day.

 

Whenever I hit a good spot  it feels like my body temp. raises at least five degrees.

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Whenever I hit a good spot  it feels like my body temp. raises at least five degrees.

 

Oh man. Half the time I'm sweating before my workout has started because of jamming some mobility tool into something junky. So much delicious ow.

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Oh man. Half the time I'm sweating before my workout has started because of jamming some mobility tool into something junky. So much delicious ow.

 

Oh I know the feeling. I don't actually foam roll before lifting, but I'm often sweating just from the first 10 squat reps with the bar -- taking it slow, sitting as deep as absolutely possible, and allowing my muscles to stretch.

 

Is it better to foam roll before, vs. after, vs. at completely different time or day?

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Oh I know the feeling. I don't actually foam roll before lifting, but I'm often sweating just from the first 10 squat reps with the bar -- taking it slow, sitting as deep as absolutely possible, and allowing my muscles to stretch.

 

Is it better to foam roll before, vs. after, vs. at completely different time or day?

 

Good question. I've seen a couple different view points on it (Kstarr posted a video about how he hates when people "roll into and out of the gym"). 

 

Personally, I do a little foam rolling at the gym, but I do a lot more work with lax balls and my super nova. 

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Whenever I hit a good spot  it feels like my body temp. raises at least five degrees.

 

I don't think you're supposed to foam roll there...

 

Oh man. Half the time I'm sweating before my workout has started because of jamming some mobility tool into something junky. So much delicious ow.

 

This made it worse and water went up my nose when I read it.

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I don't think you're supposed to foam roll there...

 

 

This made it worse and water went up my nose when I read it.

 

Damn... I usually catch my double entendres (that's french for "That's what she said!" ) before they get said...

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Hey warriors!

 

Need some help here. Does anyone know anything about compound lifting with an previously injured back? My boyfriend was in a few car crashes (one 3 years ago and one 6 months ago) and his back is pretty screwed up. It's always achy but he has worse days and better days. He lives with it without much complaint. He started lifting with me about 8 weeks ago and occasionally he starts to experience sharp pains in his back after 2 of the 3 exercises. Usually the last exercise is either deadlift or pendlay row and he has hard time when his back starts hurting and he doesn't complete the sets. It's not every time we lift, maybe once every week or two. He doesn't have insurance right now so doctor is out of the picture.

 

I'm wondering if he should sub rows/deadlifts for something else when his back is in pain so he still gets a last exercise but doesn't aggravate his back too much. I was considering him trying one of the machines that work back muscles but don't have any experience with them or with back pain so I don't know if it'd be a relief or would still aggravate the back.

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Oof. I know you said out the question but I think this is really a question for a dr.

 

That being said, has he tried deadlifting sumo? That takes a lot of strain off the back.

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Oof. I know you said out the question but I think this is really a question for a dr.

 

That being said, has he tried deadlifting sumo? That takes a lot of strain off the back.

 

Medical insurance is in the works. He hasn't been at his job long enough but its going to happen soon so I'll try to get him in.

 

He has not tried deadlifting sumo but I will discuss it with him and show him some videos and see if its something we can try. Thanks for the idea.

 

I'm torn because I don't want him to hurt himself and he's stubborn so he usually won't tell me he is in pain until its too late so part of me wants to try and get him to wait on lifting until he sees a doctor. Another part of me doesn't want that because he's finally started exercise. He has never shown interest in any type of exercise and he actually seems to enjoy lifting. If he stops though it will be very hard to convince him to get back to it.  We took a week off and it was like pulling teeth to get him back into the groove of it.

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Yeah I hear that! Definitely want to keep the momentum up if you can. But also it would proooooooooooobably be bad if he injured himself. So maybe take it a little easy on the weights? Not try to set any PRs...just maintaining?

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Hey warriors!

 

Need some help here. Does anyone know anything about compound lifting with an previously injured back? My boyfriend was in a few car crashes (one 3 years ago and one 6 months ago) and his back is pretty screwed up. It's always achy but he has worse days and better days. He lives with it without much complaint. He started lifting with me about 8 weeks ago and occasionally he starts to experience sharp pains in his back after 2 of the 3 exercises. Usually the last exercise is either deadlift or pendlay row and he has hard time when his back starts hurting and he doesn't complete the sets. It's not every time we lift, maybe once every week or two. He doesn't have insurance right now so doctor is out of the picture.

 

I'm wondering if he should sub rows/deadlifts for something else when his back is in pain so he still gets a last exercise but doesn't aggravate his back too much. I was considering him trying one of the machines that work back muscles but don't have any experience with them or with back pain so I don't know if it'd be a relief or would still aggravate the back.

 

Oof. I know you said out the question but I think this is really a question for a dr.

 

That being said, has he tried deadlifting sumo? That takes a lot of strain off the back.

 

What Mir said, he needs to see a doctor to make sure he's cleared to lift. Steve had some issues then went and found out that he's got a whacked out back. If he's definitely not seeing one, then he needs to ease into the lifting and feel it out himself. Be even more careful/strict with form than we typically are.

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Hey warriors!

 

Need some help here. Does anyone know anything about compound lifting with an previously injured back? My boyfriend was in a few car crashes (one 3 years ago and one 6 months ago) and his back is pretty screwed up. It's always achy but he has worse days and better days. He lives with it without much complaint. He started lifting with me about 8 weeks ago and occasionally he starts to experience sharp pains in his back after 2 of the 3 exercises. Usually the last exercise is either deadlift or pendlay row and he has hard time when his back starts hurting and he doesn't complete the sets. It's not every time we lift, maybe once every week or two. He doesn't have insurance right now so doctor is out of the picture.

 

I'm wondering if he should sub rows/deadlifts for something else when his back is in pain so he still gets a last exercise but doesn't aggravate his back too much. I was considering him trying one of the machines that work back muscles but don't have any experience with them or with back pain so I don't know if it'd be a relief or would still aggravate the back.

i herniated 2 discs in my back a few years ago and still have trouble with back pain both in day to day life and in lifting. my rule is if it hurts, stop. so on days it doesn't bother him, work on form to ensure that isn't adding to the issue. on days those things hurt/bother him, don't do them. but also, see a doctor asap as Latniss Everswole suggested. i personally thing, with no knowledge of his being or capabilities and basing purely on my own experience, that as he get stronger and strengthens his back the pain will become less frequent. 

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What they all said...

 

Do you think it's the deads and pendlays in particular that bother him or just his back fatigues after that many lifts?   Aside from keeping the weights light you could look into doing some body weight back work while you wait until he can get cleared from a doc.  Supermans, weightless back extensions, maybe?

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Thank you all for the advice!

 

What they all said...

 

Do you think it's the deads and pendlays in particular that bother him or just his back fatigues after that many lifts?   Aside from keeping the weights light you could look into doing some body weight back work while you wait until he can get cleared from a doc.  Supermans, weightless back extensions, maybe?

 

My guess would be that it's due to his back being fatigued from the lifting plus a back exercise at the end of the lifting. I was considering putting the rows/deadlifts at the beginning of the sessions and see if that helps. Stronglifts has it the other way but occasionally we have to change the order of lifts due to the squat rack being used when we get there. It could be a coincidence but any time we did deads/rows first he hasn't had back pain (that he has mentioned to me.. he always has some form of back pain) at the end of the workout. 

 

I'm going to find out today when he is eligible for healthcare so we can get him an appointment. Hopefully I can go with him because he downplays his pain since he's used to it and I have a feeling he will downplay it to a doctor.

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Hi warriors! I recently switched to Starting Strength and am starting to incorporate power cleans into my workout. Any advice on how to practice form? I did deadlifts on my last program, so I feel fine with the first pull, but I know that I have problems with the second pull. I'm not raising my elbows enough and I'm catching the bar more in my palms (square in the middle on my right palm and a bit higher on my left), and it's hitting my collarbone - I think I will have some nice bruises tomorrow, haha. After a bit of googling, I think that maybe 1) putting some weight on the bar and getting into front squat position to see how it feels and 2) practicing starting from the hang might be helpful. Would you recommend either of these or anything else to work on form? What was useful for you?

 

Oh and my last working deadlift set was 1 x 5 x 145 lbs, and I am doing power clean sets at 65 lbs.

 

Thanks in advance!

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Do full cleans. Very little extra technique and it will help you be in the bottom of a squat more. That'll help hip and ankle mobility in the long run, both of which are always good. Anyone have the links to the Cal Strength training vids?

Shouldn't be catching the bar in hand at all, should be all with your torso/shoulders. Hands are there to guide and stabilize.

I found front squats to be super helpful in figuring out how the rack position should feel, what the bottom position was like, and getting my wrist mobility better. Definitely get comfortable with them first before moving to full cleans, perhaps doing those as your squats on clean days instead of back squats.

Edit: Back to the full cleans, Bill Starr designed the original 5x5 program that Starting Strength and Strong lifts based on (google Bill Starr 5x5). It included full cleans and snatches. I think these guys leave them out because they're harder to teach yourself.

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Thanks! Switching to front squats on clean days sounds great. I will try that. Should I hold off on cleans until I've done a few workouts with front squats and perhaps swap out the cleans for another exercise in the meantime? Should I lighten up on the squats a bit on full clean days? 

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On clean days, I'd do cleans with the bar or whatever weight you're comfortable with following the Cal Strength video training progressions as a warm up for your front squats. From there, front squat in a normal linear progression. I could power clean over 200 when I started teaching myself full cleans, so I was lucky enough to be able to learn with 135 on the bar.

Once you learn the full cleans, still do them first as they're highly dependent on technique and you don't want to already be fatigued for them. The general rule for workout order for me is typically technique heavy stuff first for the above reasons, and the most taxing stuff last so it doesn't burn you out for everything else. That applies for the main lifts only. If you're doing any accessory world like curls, they always go last.

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Hey warriors,

I posted a little while back about having started SL5x5 (after reading Starting Strength for technique) and experiencing some soreness in my back in the hours and days after squatting, with what appears to be good form.

Well, I have an update, and a further question. First, the update: after tons of reading and performing different movement tests, I'm positive that what's actually inflamed is my left sacroiliac joint, and not the spinal erector muscles. Further reading showed me various stretches and rehabilitation exercises (one of which had an almost instant effect, amazingly) so I'm pretty confident I can successfully rehab this inflammation.

On to my question. Despite all my reading on this issue, the one thing I never found a good answer to is: can I still keep doing squats while I recover? I'm sure it looked weird, but I did some of these stretches and exercises between sets last night, and I was able to complete my squat workout with less pain and stiffness in my lower back.

Even though I felt better after doing those exercises yesterday, today I've had the same SI-joint pain and stiffness, and have been using the stretches and exercises whenever it gets uncomfortable enough that my movement is altered (i.e. I start moving around like I've got a bunch of tight muscles). I'm hoping that I don't have to cut out squatting, but I'm also not willing to cause a more significant injury.

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Oh boy. Si joint problems. I had this earlier in the year. I was not allowed to lift for something like 8 weeks. And I will still get some pain if I don't brace my core tight enough or if I hyperextend - either in squat or bench. I would keep an eye out for those. I'm on my phone right now and by the time I'm at a computer I will probably forget, so send me a pm or comment on my challenge or something and I will give you some of the stuff I have been doing.

Pardon typos. Sheep have hooves, not hands.

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Oh boy. Si joint problems. I had this earlier in the year. I was not allowed to lift for something like 8 weeks. And I will still get some pain if I don't brace my core tight enough or if I hyperextend - either in squat or bench. I would keep an eye out for those. I'm on my phone right now and by the time I'm at a computer I will probably forget, so send me a pm or comment on my challenge or something and I will give you some of the stuff I have been doing.

Pardon typos. Sheep have hooves, not hands.

Thank you so much, Latniss. Sending you a PM here in just a minute. I was pretty sure my issue started on squats, so yeah, it'll be good to keep an eye out on my bench, too. Maybe I was completely missing something to protect myself on that lift.

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Last fall I had to deal with an SI joint problem, but it only kept me out for a week or so.

 

I got it from squatting because I dinged the plates on the safety pins, knocking me a bit sideways then straining to correct myself. I felt fine for the rest of the workout, but the next day I could barely get out of bed. Went to the doctor, did some stretching, put a thicker cushion on my chair, and was fine a few days later. Its a fairly common problem and there's lots on the internet for how to stretch and correct it.

 

Basically, it varies.

 

When I was at the doctor, he asked me to extend my leg, and he pulled it up just a bit. It felt fine so he said it was okay and if it didn't go away after a few days to come back. So if you can do that you should be fine with a bit of rest.

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Add me to the list of people with SI problems.  Luckily for me, I was going to the chiropractor regularly so it never had the opportunity to get too bad.  I generally rest immediately after issues arise for 2-7 days (feel it out).  Meanwhile, I do the stretches and exercises to help it (I'm sure Mir sent you a bunch), then get back to it. 

 

SI problems are also why I do daily glute activation in the morning. For me, that keeps things in order.

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