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ycantha

Beginning Running Program

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mcdrew, I totally feel your pain. I did too much, too soon as well when I started running and am currently paying the price for it. Going slower than you think you should is the best advice out there. You can always go faster, you can't undo an injury. GL and keep it up!

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Per the question of why this one over couch to 5k, I agree with Hannibal, it doesn't really matter. The programs are incredibly similar in that they start you off with long walking intervals and slowly shrink them and increase your running intervals, both will work.

Edit: I personally did couch to 5k and it worked great. At the end of it I ran a 5k in 33 minutes, then my next one in just under 30.

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Does anyone have ideas of how to make beginner running programs like the Couch to 5k less mind-numbingly boring? I DO like running, before anyone tells me not to do something I don't enjoy. I just don't enjoy running for only 30 seconds at a time. When I ran regularly in college I loved it and would spend my free time exploring the trails around campus. But I'm out of shape and need to start over and have ankle issues to begin with, so I really need to follow a gradual program but it's so.... tedious! Barefoot has made a huge difference for me, but I still need to start slow and I HATE that. How do you get through those first couple weeks?

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the other day I tryed to go out and run like... i don't know... 3-4 laps to a square near my house... like... 1,2 km each one without walking nor rest...

Good: I managed to do the 3 laps (3,6 km) :D

bad: After the first one i felt like dying (fuck you ego that make's me run after this point)

really bad: 1 of my shoulders started to hurt close to the end.

hell: my (translating)... spleen ? (in spanish is called "bazo"... don't know if it is the right word) is still hurting me if I walk 2 or more streets...

so.. it's almost a week from this, my shoulder is ok it healed almost after I stoped, and my spleen seems better because it doesn't hurt anymore.

q&a time :P

1) should I go and check with a doctor? (you know, because of the sholder and the spleen)

2) how much time I should run for a good start if i'm ok? (like, i have no cardio, and a little of stamina, i'm not overweight, and I'm 17 yrs old)

thanks :)

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I'm just worried about angrifying old injuries by pushing too much too soon... I had to force myself to slow down during my run today. My first few intervals felt AWESOME... and then I got a sharp little pain in my arch, which reminded me "oh right, it's winter time. You haven't been wandering around everywhere barefoot. Your feet have been contorted and tortured by the evil shoes you have to wear at work. Maybe you should take this a little easier..."

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I'm just worried about angrifying old injuries by pushing too much too soon... I had to force myself to slow down during my run today. My first few intervals felt AWESOME... and then I got a sharp little pain in my arch, which reminded me "oh right, it's winter time. You haven't been wandering around everywhere barefoot. Your feet have been contorted and tortured by the evil shoes you have to wear at work. Maybe you should take this a little easier..."

I always just listen to my body. Right now I'm training my feet up to run barefoot and my limiting factor is that my forefeet aren't used to the impact or friction yet, so they start to hurt. I push through the initial discomfort for a bit, but once it starts building, I slow to a walk for a few minutes. It takes longer and longer for my feet to get ot the pain point each time though, so I know I'm improving. This is what pain is for, it's a feedback to tell you when to slow down, so listen to it.

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I've never liked running.

Read: because I sucked at it and would be a hot wheezing mess if I did.

So I tried spin class.

um...worse than running (which I didn't think possible)

So I found the tool to help me.

Nike+ transmitter in my shoe paired with my iphone.

I now have a reason to run besides fitness - it tracks all my data so I can see what I am doing which allows me to challenge myself.

Which the competitor in me loves.

I used to only be able to run for a minute at a time before walking.

today I ran 3.5k in 25 minutes.

I am growing in my like of running.

I am loving the way I feel after I do.

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The best advice I can give is to listen to your body. Push yourself, but not too hard. If you have a really strong run one day, it's okay to jog the next day, unless you feel like you can handle another strong run. Overall trends are more important than day-to-day runs. You should be asking yourself: are you generally running farther and/or faster than you were a few months ago?

Plans should be more like guidelines. If you feel like your plan is too easy, it's okay to take things up a notch, you can always scale things back if needed. Likewise, if the plan is too hard, it's okay to adjust and take things easier. You might not get the time you were hoping for, but it's better to run a race slow than to miss it completely because you're injured.

When I started running, I didn't follow a plan. There was a 2.5 mile loop around my apartment complex that I would try to do. When I first started, I couldn't make it the whole way without stopping. So, I gradually worked at it until I could. When I had mastered that, I started to lengthen the loop and came up with 3.5 mile and 6 mile versions of it that I would do.

Now that I'm up to half marathons, I do have plans that I follow, but, like I said, they're more like guidelines. First of all, I make my own plans based on what I've heard other people doing and what I think my body is capable of. Second, I stray from the plan when I feel its necessary. If I have a 10 mile run scheduled the next day, but my foot is really sore from pushing myself all throughout the week, I'm either not going to run the full 10 miles or I'm going to do it at a very slow pace depending on the severity of the muscle pain.

That sums up my advice for a beginner. Make of it what you will.

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Started Couch-to-5K on Saturday. Still waiting for my thighs to stop being sore before I do W1D2. ;)

Both of my friends run so I decided to try to do a 5K with them this year as one of my fitness goals.

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When healthy, I try to run between 12 -15 miles a week... at a long steady pace.. Once a week I do a HIIT workout. I switch up treadmill/trail/track. I also found that I workout a lot more efficiently when I have a heart rate monitor on.. as sometimes I think I'm working hard, but really, I'm just lazy. The HRM has gotten me from a 10/mile to what was around 8:45ish/mile. Big difference. Just listen to your body.. When running a 5k, I actually have a playlist named "5k" so that at each song I should know where I am at in my run... Additionally, I found a pretty sweet site (thanks Pinterest!) that gives you a listing of songs to listen to if you want run a certain pace... I cheat, I get the playlist then download them seperately, but this way you have a constant beat/pace... the website is: http://jog.fm/workout-songs

For all runners though, we aren't built to run long steady miles, so if you don't like running a lot, do 1 or 2 long rungs, but incorporate a HIIT workout. I've had 20 minute HIIT that have exhausted me more than a 7 mile run.

If you want a sample program pm... I got some good ones!

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I would chime in with another bit of advice - if you do get injured, and are laid off for a few weeks, don't start again where you left off (i.e. if you were running 20 minutes at a time when you got injured, don't run 20 minutes first day back). Recipe for disaster. It can happen to newbies and veterans. I have seen it first hand with a friend of mine who ran a marathon, ignored advice not to run for a couple of weeks afterwards, and got a stress fracture in his foot. It healed, he started running again, two weeks later BAM! Same fracture.

Your muscles take way longer than your cardiovascular system to adapt to new stressors, and your bones even longer. Be nice to them.

Quoted for truth.

I know this and still get in trouble.

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