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Obitim

Deadlift Grip?

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Hi there,

 

I recently saw a personal trainer to check my form when weightlifting and while he had some great advice on squats and the bench press and getting my form correct he did give me some odd advice for the deadlift:

 

He suggested that rather than both hands gripping the bar with knuckles on top that instead I should do one hand knuckles on top and the other with knuckles under the bar.  When I queried this he told me it's for grip and easier to stabilise the bar but I'm still not convinced.  Anyone else use this technique, does it have any benefits?

 

Cheers!

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Alternate grip is a lot easier the DOH. When i started deadlifting i could only lift the bar by using alternate grip, so i would say his advice is valid. Once your hands get a bit stronger its easier to go back to DOH which is what i have done.

 

Wakakaka just edited this as i realised i was saying DOA instead of DOH, way too tired to function today

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Cheers!

 

yeah, I used to do a lot of Jujitsu so grip isn't the issue and for some reason the DOH seems a lot more manly!

 

If there's no other benefits then I reckon I'll stick with DOH...

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I use DOH up til I the bar starts slipping out of my hands. Pulling DOH will work grip strength harder than using alternate grip, while alternate grip will make it so grip isn't your limiting factor in the lift.

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Also, keep in mind, if you exclusively use alternate grip, one of your traps will form a lot faster than the other. There was a time in my training a year or so ago where my right trap stood about a half inch higher than my left when flexed... odd to say the least. 

 

You should focus on double overhand until you are no longer capable of holding the weight as such. 

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Personally I use DOH, hook grip, or straps 99% of the time in training. I reserve mixed grip for the platform or PR attempts. I have a healthy fear of tearing a bicep.

 

That's a good point to bring up:

 

Do you think that beginner/novice trainers should stick to strict DOH or train hook grip?

And do you think that straps should only be used for high rep sets to protect the hands or are you using them whenever you're pulling off the ground? 

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Once grip becomes a limiting factor for a novice/intermediate they should switch to mixed or hook if they plan on competing. If not straps are fine. I use straps pretty much all the time now save for my warm ups. But I've been pulling a lot lately anywhere from 30-45 reps in a session.

 

Also for those that do mix grip they need to be alternating their supinated and pronated hands every so often to curb imbalances.

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I also use overhand until the weight is too much, then I alternate. I never thought about the traps being uneven, I'll keep that in mind. Chalk or chalk alternative can also help your grip, I'm thinking about getting eco chalk ball by Metolius.

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As to why alternate grip is more stable - when you're holding the bar DOH it wants to escape from your hands in the direction of least resistance. When you use alternate grip you've got more-or-less equal pressure on both sides of the bar, so it stays put better.

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I use DOH up til I the bar starts slipping out of my hands. Pulling DOH will work grip strength harder than using alternate grip, while alternate grip will make it so grip isn't your limiting factor in the lift.

 

This. I've never noticed any visual imbalances myself from only doing right hand under. Whenever I try left hand under it feels awkward.

 

As to why alternate grip is more stable - when you're holding the bar DOH it wants to escape from your hands in the direction of least resistance. When you use alternate grip you've got more-or-less equal pressure on both sides of the bar, so it stays put better.

 

It's sort of this? Failure occurs as the grip weakens, the hand opens, and the bar rolls down the hand and out. Because it rolls in the hand, friction between skin and the bar doesn't do anything since slipping isn't the failure mode. When using mixed grip, if it rolled down in one hand, it would have to roll up the other or slip against the skin. It's not going to roll upand slipping won't happen unless the hands are wet. This brings the friction between the bar and hands into play, which gives an effectively stronger grip as no/little rolling of the bar can occur.

 

Hook grip also brings friction into play because the thumb is typically stronger than the fingers and has a larger pad area, meaning you can creat more friction by pushing the thumb against the index and middle fingers than vice versa, creating a stronger grip because there are more forces preventing the hand from opening.

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Gainsdalf - you're right handed? I read a thing earlier today saying that most people reverse their dominant hand. I always supinate my left (weak) hand. That's just how I do it naturally....

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Gainsdalf - you're right handed? I read a thing earlier today saying that most people reverse their dominant hand. I always supinate my left (weak) hand. That's just how I do it naturally....

I am right handed and left hand under feels more natural to me. Probably because of the aforementioned hook grip working grip more and my right being dominant means a stronger overhand grip with my right.

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Personally I use DOH, hook grip, or straps 99% of the time in training. I reserve mixed grip for the platform or PR attempts. I have a healthy fear of tearing a bicep.

 

I am curious about this.  Is tearing a bicep a reasonable fear?  I hear a lot of advocacy for mixed grip and I've never heard any warnings at all about tearing biceps. 

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I am curious about this.  Is tearing a bicep a reasonable fear?  I hear a lot of advocacy for mixed grip and I've never heard any warnings at all about tearing biceps. 

 

It happens but its not very common. I just saw a video of it happening to a guy once and it scarred the shit out of me. 

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Most biceps tears seem to happen because lifters will flex the biceps at the beginning or have limited range of motion at the elbow joint (too many curls??). Keep your arms straight and it shouldn't be much of a problem. 

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I haven't deadlifted in months (once in the last seven months) thanks to Olympic lifting programming but when I did, I used double overhand as high as I could go and then alternate with my left hand (the weaker one) supinated. These days I'd probably just hook grip it.

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Most biceps tears seem to happen because lifters will flex the biceps at the beginning or have limited range of motion at the elbow joint (too many curls??). Keep your arms straight and it shouldn't be much of a problem. 

 

Exactly. The reason its common in mixed grip is because the supinated side naturally wants to curl. 

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I've seen it(aka on youtube) twice. Guy finishes the pull on one and you can see the bicep just slowly detaching and curling up into the top of his arm. It's horrifying. 

 

That's why you should let your arms be slack and not try to hitch with your arms as you're nearing lock out. It's not often, but it does happen. Do note, these guys are lifting well over 2-3x their bodyweight, so don't get it in your head that it's going to happen on your drop sets at 135. 

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Yes Mir, right handed. The dominant hand is the most dexterous, so it makes sense people world flip that one when told to "flip one".

And yeah, bicep tears are scary, so don't curl. I actually grip the shit out of the bar and almost force extend my arms a bit.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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