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Teeraw2000

How much weight should I be deadlifting (women)????

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Hey guys,

 

So, I started deadlifting today. after reading Steve's article on performing a proper deadlife, but I have no idea how much I should be lifting? I did a 45 pound bar bell. But, when I go online and look at deadlift videos for women, I see girls lifting much, much more and 3x5 reps.

 

I know it is strength dependent. I am not a beginner, but I am not a pro at lifting. I am 5'9, 157 pounds and just want to make sure I am getting the most of it, as it is recommended that women do deadlifts.

 

Thoughts??

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Lift what is a challenge, but a weight you can keep you back straight at.  :)  It is absolutely okay to start lower and then just add weight every time you deadlift.  Weightlifting is not a race and not something that is comparative to anybody else but yourself. (ie: do not care what any other woman lifts, she could have been doing it for years!)

 

Get a buddy to watch to make sure you aren't going into flexion in your spine. If it flexes it is possible you have hit the "too much weight" for your supporting muscles and tendons. 

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heavy is not a number.  And asking how much you should be lifting is completely irrelevant and arbitrary to almost anything unless your completing- and then the answer will be- more than your competitor. 

 

Heavy is rep range. My friends can't rep 135.  That's ONE of my warm up weights.

 

it's completely relative to where YOU are in your training.

 

Start with the bar- add some weight- work your way up. If you are following a program- follow the program (Which from your two posts combined- I highly would suggest you doing)

 

New rules of lifting (for men or women either or)

Strong Curves

Starting Strength 5x5

 

all excellent programs. 

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heavy is not a number.  And asking how much you should be lifting is completely irrelevant and arbitrary to almost anything unless your completing- and then the answer will be- more than your competitor. 

 

Heavy is rep range. My friends can't rep 135.  That's ONE of my warm up weights.

 

it's completely relative to where YOU are in your training.

 

Start with the bar- add some weight- work your way up. If you are following a program- follow the program (Which from your two posts combined- I highly would suggest you doing)

 

New rules of lifting (for men or women either or)

Strong Curves

Starting Strength 5x5

 

all excellent programs. 

I am not following a program, no. I will take a look at those that you suggested. I agree, it isn't a race. How much does just the bar weigh?? Also, what is the benefit of a "program"? I feel like I have researched a lot of what I'm doing without having an exact program... Just curious. 

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The benefits of a planned oout program is that it takes the guess work out of what you do at the gym, and keeps you progressing in your lifts. Without a program (plan of action) people tend to do random stuff in the gym with out ever progressing in strength gains. 

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Doesn't so much matter what weight you start at, as long as you can lift it with good form and have a decent plan for progression. You'll start pushing the limits of your strength soon enough just by adding weight to the bar consistently.

 

Following a program is helpful in that a decent program has been put together by somebody experienced and knowledgeable, so it can allow you to avoid newbie mistakes that you otherwise wouldn't even know to watch for (even if you're an infovore, probably a common trait here on NF, there's still a long learning curve), and it's a way to be sure you're doing something reasonably effective.

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heavy is not a number.  And asking how much you should be lifting is completely irrelevant and arbitrary to almost anything unless your completing- and then the answer will be- more than your competitor. 

 

Heavy is rep range. My friends can't rep 135.  That's ONE of my warm up weights.

 

it's completely relative to where YOU are in your training.

 

Start with the bar- add some weight- work your way up. If you are following a program- follow the program (Which from your two posts combined- I highly would suggest you doing)

 

New rules of lifting (for men or women either or)

Strong Curves

Starting Strength 5x5

 

all excellent programs. 

 

What she said. 

 

Also, the deadlift is a full-body move with potential to do some damage to you if you don't execute it correctly. Starting at a light weight is a good opportunity to get your form sorted without risking injury before you move on to heavier loads.

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Ugh....Showed by Dad and brother my form last night. They said my back is all wrong. In fact, I need to lift my heels to have the back posture. This doesn't seem right to me after everything I've looked at. I am going to try and find someone at the gym to help me with form. I can only imagine how many people do not grasp the form of this move!!!!

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Get a broom stick. takea  video- show us what you are doing.

 

We can help- we have an entire section dedicated to form reviews- we aren't mean I promise. we are very helpful.

 

Seriously- you need to get form right before you can even think of going up.

 

Remember- even Mr Olympia started with nothing. 

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Get a broom stick. takea  video- show us what you are doing.

 

We can help- we have an entire section dedicated to form reviews- we aren't mean I promise. we are very helpful.

 

Seriously- you need to get form right before you can even think of going up.

 

Remember- even Mr Olympia started with nothing. 

I can do that. How in the mother do I load a video on here!!! 

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Once you get your form down, I found these targets helpful for me to contextualise what I should be aiming for with months and years of training:

 

http://gubernatrix.co.uk/2008/12/strength-standards-for-women/

 

These are really interesting. I'd been using the EXRX standards, but like how these are laid out a bit more. However, I'm a lot closer to meeting the good weights for bench and press (I might exceed if I had a trusted spotter) than squat and deadlift and can't imagine that many good form push ups or dips yet. Can anyone comment on whether these seem like balanced standards? In other words, if I can bench half my weight should I really be able to deadlift 1.5x? 

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bench seems off. 

 

Pull ups are off

 

push ups are off

 

They are a little light- but they aren't bad.

Most standards for women are pathetically low.... like I think I rate on the  "you're a super amazing lifter type person" and I really consider myself to be average.  

 

This charts better than most- but I still think it's not great. But I don't really think standardized standards are that useful anyway. 

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A classic ratio to shoot for as far as a novice as far press/bench/squat/deadlift 2/3/4/5 though it usually ends up more like 2/3/4/4.5. Women typically have stronger lower bodies compared to upper bodies though, so the squats and deadlifts turn out to be a bit higher than that for them.

 

Also, in general, leg strength is typically under valued and it's progression underestimated in the standards I've seen outside powerlifting.

 

 

Once you get your form down, I found these targets helpful for me to contextualise what I should be aiming for with months and years of training:

 

http://gubernatrix.co.uk/2008/12/strength-standards-for-women/

 

For this link, I don't really think the "good" column is acceptable. I think the lower bounds of the "very good" are the minimum acceptable standards with the excellent being pretty accurate for deadlifts and squats.  Bench and press should probably be another 25% higher for men, not sure for women, but they still seem low. Maybe only another 10%.

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A classic ratio to shoot for as far as a novice as far press/bench/squat/deadlift 2/3/4/5 though it usually ends up more like 2/3/4/4.5. Women typically have stronger lower bodies compared to upper bodies though, so the squats and deadlifts turn out to be a bit higher than that for them.

 

2x bodyweight press for a novice? I'm assuming I misread you there......Those look really aggressive.....

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I think that's ratios between your lifts, not ratios of lifts:bodyweight. So for every 2 pounds you can press, you should be able to bench 3, squat 4, and deadlift 5. Like, if you can press 60 pounds, you should also be able to bench 90, squat 120, and deadlift 150. So it's more of a way to figure out if you're ahead/lagging in any given area relative to the rest of your progress, not so much for measuring progress overall.

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I think that's ratios between your lifts, not ratios of lifts:bodyweight. So for every 2 pounds you can press, you should be able to bench 3, squat 4, and deadlift 5. Like, if you can press 60 pounds, you should also be able to bench 90, squat 120, and deadlift 150. So it's more of a way to figure out if you're ahead/lagging in any given area relative to the rest of your progress, not so much for measuring progress overall.

 

Yeah, it was this, my bad.

 

For weights, just base everything off of a 2x bodyweight squat for excellent, and a 1,5x bodywight squat for acceptable. 

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I think that's ratios between your lifts, not ratios of lifts:bodyweight. So for every 2 pounds you can press, you should be able to bench 3, squat 4, and deadlift 5. Like, if you can press 60 pounds, you should also be able to bench 90, squat 120, and deadlift 150. So it's more of a way to figure out if you're ahead/lagging in any given area relative to the rest of your progress, not so much for measuring progress overall.

 

Huh. Interesting!

 

So if I base this off my current 5RM, by press and bench are dead on, but my squat and deadlift are ahead... like 2/3/4.6/6+.

More presses needed, maybe...

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