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Teeraw2000

How much weight should I be deadlifting (women)????

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For this link, I don't really think the "good" column is acceptable. I think the lower bounds of the "very good" are the minimum acceptable standards with the excellent being pretty accurate for deadlifts and squats.  Bench and press should probably be another 25% higher for men, not sure for women, but they still seem low. Maybe only another 10%.

 

I realize that this is n=1, but with the exception of my deadlift, my lifts all fall pretty much smack in the "very good" category.  My deadlift is "good", and I know that it is comparatively weak due to a combination of form issues and mental hangups that I am working on.  My husband is a lot stronger than me on the predominantly upper body lifts, relative to his body weight.

 

When my lifts were in the "good" category, they were still turning heads at the gym, and so his description about good being impressive compared to the average gym goer isn't that far off.  After a deadlift rep at 225 (135% of body weight) slipped out of my hands and made a big noise, I had three people come up to me to ask me if I really just lifted that up by myself.  This reflects more on your average gym goer than on what "strong" is though.

 

Back to the original question, I lift an amount that is challenging but allows me to complete my targeted number of reps with good form, and I increase it every workout.  This is what I should be lifting.  I do like to look at standards to see what I could be lifting with time if I stick with it and work hard.

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I realize that this is n=1, but with the exception of my deadlift, my lifts all fall pretty much smack in the "very good" category.  My deadlift is "good", and I know that it is comparatively weak due to a combination of form issues and mental hangups that I am working on.  My husband is a lot stronger than me on the predominantly upper body lifts, relative to his body weight.

 

When my lifts were in the "good" category, they were still turning heads at the gym, and so his description about good being impressive compared to the average gym goer isn't that far off.  After a deadlift rep at 225 (135% of body weight) slipped out of my hands and made a big noise, I had three people come up to me to ask me if I really just lifted that up by myself.  This reflects more on your average gym goer than on what "strong" is though.

 

Back to the original question, I lift an amount that is challenging but allows me to complete my targeted number of reps with good form, and I increase it every workout.  This is what I should be lifting.  I do like to look at standards to see what I could be lifting with time if I stick with it and work hard.

 

Yeah, his numbers are fine for the perception of the average gym goer, most of which don't even lift. But if you are someone who touches a weight regilarly, you quickly realize how high everyone's strength potentional actually is if they actually trained it once in awhile and how weak we really are before we started getting under the bar.

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Yeah, his numbers are fine for the perception of the average gym goer, most of which don't even lift. But if you are someone who touches a weight regilarly, you quickly realize how high everyone's strength potentional actually is if they actually trained it once in awhile and how weak we really are before we started getting under the bar.

 

Part of the issue is that even your average gym goer who lifts doesn't progressively increase the resistance or train for strength, and so that 225 lb deadlift seems so much more impressive than the 8 lb tricep kickbacks that they've been doing.  I am the only one in the 6 am gym crowd at my gym who seems to be following a strength program that involves something other than pressing.

 

I think that there's some value in having "good" numbers along those lines, because it does give someone who hasn't picked up the barbell before a seemingly achievable goal.  I had to work up to a goal of squatting one plate, and then squatting body weight, and then squatting two plates.  Yet the stronger I get, the weaker I feel, because I see how much unrealized potential I have.  I'll get there one day.

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Part of the issue is that even your average gym goer who lifts doesn't progressively increase the resistance or train for strength, and so that 225 lb deadlift seems so much more impressive than the 8 lb tricep kickbacks that they've been doing.  I am the only one in the 6 am gym crowd at my gym who seems to be following a strength program that involves something other than pressing.

 

I think that there's some value in having "good" numbers along those lines, because it does give someone who hasn't picked up the barbell before a seemingly achievable goal.  I had to work up to a goal of squatting one plate, and then squatting body weight, and then squatting two plates.  Yet the stronger I get, the weaker I feel, because I see how much unrealized potential I have.  I'll get there one day.

 

This happens to every single one of us who ends up having success, and no, you'll never get there one day, because it will keep happening, because once you're there you know you can be even better. Once you hit your next goal, you'll be happy about it for a few days, but then you'll have formed a new goal to strive for. This is a good and a bad thing.

 

It's good because this is the driving force that each person that is succesful in strength training or really any atheltic endeavor shares, and it is the very reason for that continued success. Think about where you'd be now if you'd been happy with squatting one plate when you got there? Sure, you'd be stronger, but nothing near what you are now. I did the same thing. First I wanted a 2 plate squat, then 3, then 4, and recently hit 5. Next goal is 6, and I say I'll stop there, but I doubt it'll happen when I get there.

 

And that's where the bad part comes in. For all this striving for a goal and success in strength training, you'll never reach the peak and be competely content with what you've done, the point at which you've accomplished everything there is to accomplish. Mountain climbers have Mount Everest, but for the strength athlete, there is always another 5 lbs that will fit on the bar.

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Part of the issue is that even your average gym goer who lifts doesn't progressively increase the resistance or train for strength, and so that 225 lb deadlift seems so much more impressive than the 8 lb tricep kickbacks that they've been doing.  I am the only one in the 6 am gym crowd at my gym who seems to be following a strength program that involves something other than pressing.

I miss read your post- or skimmed it- and this is EXACTLY what I was going to type- then re-read and realized it was there already.  It's not so much that what we do is that good- because compared to seasoned lifters- it's just meh- they are respectable.  But the reality is 90% of the gym people aren't training- they are there to do something then go home. It's the difference between people who are there to just work out- and the people who are training.

 

This happens to every single one of us who ends up having success, and no, you'll never get there one day, because it will keep happening, because once you're there you know you can be even better. Once you hit your next goal, you'll be happy about it for a few days, but then you'll have formed a new goal to strive for. This is a good and a bad thing.

 

It's good because this is the driving force that each person that is succesful in strength training or really any atheltic endeavor shares, and it is the very reason for that continued success. Think about where you'd be now if you'd been happy with squatting one plate when you got there? Sure, you'd be stronger, but nothing near what you are now. I did the same thing. First I wanted a 2 plate squat, then 3, then 4, and recently hit 5. Next goal is 6, and I say I'll stop there, but I doubt it'll happen when I get there.

 

And that's where the bad part comes in. For all this striving for a goal and success in strength training, you'll never reach the peak and be competely content with what you've done, the point at which you've accomplished everything there is to accomplish. Mountain climbers have Mount Everest, but for the strength athlete, there is always another 5 lbs that will fit on the bar.

god this post is spot on.

 

And it's true for any technical thing- not just strength- the longer I spend dancing- the more frustrated I get with my standards - people think I'm great- but they don't realize what I see on a regular basis and who I dance next to- and the quality of your expectations goes UP the longer you commit to something. 

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This happens to every single one of us who ends up having success, and no, you'll never get there one day, because it will keep happening, because once you're there you know you can be even better. Once you hit your next goal, you'll be happy about it for a few days, but then you'll have formed a new goal to strive for. This is a good and a bad thing..

Definitely this!! And that's whats keeps me going back!

On my phone. Forgive the short post!

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Wow, those "good" numbers are really tough. I've been lifting a year and can't squat or deadlift that much at all, not even close. Oddly my press is in the very good column but I feel it's my suckiest lift by far.

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