• Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Quilly

Calling all Capoeiristas!

Recommended Posts

I've been going to a Capoeira class for 8 months now and even though it often leaves me gasping for breath collapsed against a wall, I love it. Especially the musical aspects of it. For all those who have participated in a roda before, you know what I mean when I say the vibe from having all that singing and instruments going on while you're in the ring is fantastic. Such great energy. 

 

 

What are your experiences with Capoeira? :D 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm new to it too. I've been taking Capoeira classes for about 3 months and the whole martial art is great! I have a long ways to go before being any kind of decent. But I agree the energy in the roda is amazing. It actually feels like the music is pushing you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*puts up her hand* can i still buy into this game? been playing with Cordau De Ouro in Perth for the last 2 years or so. Still suck, but still having fun :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I absolutely hate it.  I think it's awesome but when I tried it I would always freeze in the Roda.  I'm not one who can practice new moves for a half hour then somehow incorporate that into a 'dance' with another person.  My common sense self kept trying to apply it to martial arts, but when I followed that line of thought my instincts are to strike, not do Capoeira moves. 

 

I also suck at dancing, so maybe that's why Capoeira was so hard for me.

 

It's cool to watch people who are good at it though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

my instincts are to strike, not do Capoeira moves

This is often a huge problem for new players, afterall half the moves are kicks! But try to think of it not as a competition or spar, but as a conversation. A good conversation is not where one person speaks and the other person cant get a word in, but one where both people can talk and respond to one another. Capoeira is the same, every movement should encourage your partner to move and respond. Flow is what to strive for, a good conversation. 

 

And then you have mandinga and tricking your opponent and take down, but those still come from the same place.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found out there's a school in my town that teaches capoeira along with some other exotic martial arts like silat.  I need to be performing a little more regularly to earn enough to justify the costs, but it's definitely on the table.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

20 years ago I studied capoeira with Mestra Edna Lima in New York City.  The class was offered as part of my college's athletic program.

 

It was an unmitigated, unadulterated blast.

 

Most of the people in the class were dance students. I had a black belt in Shotokan.  Mestra Edna had a 4th degree black belt in Shotokan, as well as her mestra ranking, so if I didn't understand something she could explain it in karate terms.  (There's a surprising amount of crossover in terms of kicking technique; the martelo, bencao, chapa, queixada, gancho, and meia lua are all found in Shotokan.)  The dancers were more fluid, but I could put more power into my techniques and I wasn't afraid to get in close.

 

One time, Mestra Edna played one on one with each member of the class.  Just for fun, I threw in a couple of martelos, which she hadn't taught us.  She gave me a big smile, then caught me with a perfectly timed bencao.  I stopped trying to get fancy after that.

 

What hitlionsoul said about conversation rather than competition is very true.  Capoeira requires you to keep a close eye on your partner in spite of the changes in angle, position and orientation.  I always approached it as a game of tag.  You don't try to hurt people when you're playing tag; you're out to have fun.  And oh, capoeira was FUN!  I loved the acrobatics, the rhythms, the singing... I couldn't do a handstand to save my life, but I took great pleasure in doing whatever I could.  If I had the time and the money, injuries permitting, I'd start back up in a second.

 

One of the first things Mestra Edna taught us was Au, or cartwheel.  I'm proud to say that, 20 years later, I can still do a cartwheel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oi pessoal.

 

I'm down in Brazil right now doing capoeira 3x weekly.  The energy you speak of that you get from the music and excitemenet-- I believe they call it achei down here. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

20 years ago I studied capoeira with Mestra Edna Lima in New York City.  The class was offered as part of my college's athletic program.

 

It was an unmitigated, unadulterated blast.

 

Most of the people in the class were dance students. I had a black belt in Shotokan.  Mestra Edna had a 4th degree black belt in Shotokan, as well as her mestra ranking, so if I didn't understand something she could explain it in karate terms.  (There's a surprising amount of crossover in terms of kicking technique; the martelo, bencao, chapa, queixada, gancho, and meia lua are all found in Shotokan.)  The dancers were more fluid, but I could put more power into my techniques and I wasn't afraid to get in close.

 

One time, Mestra Edna played one on one with each member of the class.  Just for fun, I threw in a couple of martelos, which she hadn't taught us.  She gave me a big smile, then caught me with a perfectly timed bencao.  I stopped trying to get fancy after that.

 

What hitlionsoul said about conversation rather than competition is very true.  Capoeira requires you to keep a close eye on your partner in spite of the changes in angle, position and orientation.  I always approached it as a game of tag.  You don't try to hurt people when you're playing tag; you're out to have fun.  And oh, capoeira was FUN!  I loved the acrobatics, the rhythms, the singing... I couldn't do a handstand to save my life, but I took great pleasure in doing whatever I could.  If I had the time and the money, injuries permitting, I'd start back up in a second.

 

One of the first things Mestra Edna taught us was Au, or cartwheel.  I'm proud to say that, 20 years later, I can still do a cartwheel.

 

Haha,I also struggled for a really long time with the acrobatics...I was SO proud of myself when I learnt how to cartwheel,lul. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ex-Capoeirista here.

Well, what can I say? It was a great system with an awesome, awesome history. It is my firm opinion that no fighting style has more interesting origins than the art of Capoeira.

Capoeira made me stronger, introduced me to advanced calisthenics, taught me a bunch of great moves, allowed me to meet some great people, and through it I figured out how to understand a Brazilian accent...

I quit because I wanted to focus on my boxing more.

 

What I loved about it:

  • Excellent workout, nuff said.
  • Rodas were always a blast.
  • I was allowed to be a lot more creative in Capoeira. I like to think I'm somewhat creative naturally so this was a huge plus.
  • The practitioners are usually awesome people. They are martial artists, yet lack the typical arrogance that many fighters show. They're always great people to train with, that's for sure.

What made me quit it:

  • It didn't challenge me mentally. The reason I love boxing and grappling is because of how mentally tough you get after you get hit. In my two years of Capoeira I got hit twice, and in those instances my classmates still clamored over to see if I was okay.
  • It's a game, and it's taught as a game. When I played in the roda, I approached it like a game of tag.

Again, overall it's a great system. I probably won't come back to it but I'm hope the skills I learnt from Capoeira will always stay with me (for example, no handed carwheels and backflips. I will cry if I ever forget how to do those; it took me constant, constant practice to master them!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's how capoeira is; if you really want to get hit and feel like youre "getting ready for a fight" with your training then capoeira is gonna feel pretty lackluster. Alternatively, if you're sick of being hit in the face and want to practice the rigors of martial arts without worrying about sustaining a brain injury, capoeira is your jam. 

 

that being said, if a capoeirista wants to hit you, they can hit you fucking hard. 

 

http://youtu.be/e0KfQE2-ZqA?t=2m28s

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

that being said, if a capoeirista wants to hit you, they can hit you fucking hard. 

 

A big yes, but with due respect an even bigger no.

 

The capoeirista in that clip violated the biggest rule of combat sports; do NOT turn your back on your opponent. Our capoeirista got himself in the worst possible position within the first five seconds of that match (both legs off the ground with your back to your opponent).

Why does this matter? Well, it's to gauge the competency of the fighter he's up against.

Do you think any fighter with a bit of talent and a lot of training would have let him get away with jumping into the air and turning his back? No. In all truth, if he were up against a competent fighter, the video would be titled "Official Five Second Knock Out: Capoeirista gets owned.".

Now, I'd wager my cat on the point that the opponent was extremely intimidated. He most likely did not understand the complex, unorthodox style of Capoeira and thus failed to see the horrible, horrible weaknesses that the capoeirista revealed.

 

Do not let the above deter you from the potential power of capoeira. The martial art uses the weight of the whole body in most attacks, which basically means that they potentially kick much harder than most.

Capoeiristas are very well conditioned. Their training is pretty much advanced calisthenics and they train to be fast and smooth.

However, all of the above goes to shit in actual combat if you don't train it for the purpose of combat.

 

My final point in the matter is thus:

A capoeirista who trains to hurt you will probably be able to hurt you fucking hard. (these are the few who train in capoeirista for MMA)

 

A capoeirista who trains to play a game with you will most likely not be able to hurt you fucking hard. (these are the vast majority of capoeiristas.)

 

Just my two cents! xD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

if he were up against a competent fighter

"with all due respect" - fuck off with your no true scotsman fallacy. im not trying to say capoeiristas make the best fighters, im saying the moves aren't just for show. it's a game yes, but its a game the same way field hockey is a game. no ones trying to hurt anyone, but a stray flick can result in a quick trip to the emergency room. 

 

also this isn't the "which martial art would win in a fight?" thread; this is the capoeira thread. and you're making some bold claims about the game that don't hold water. the facts are there are capoeiristas out there who train to hit people, use capoeira moves in "combat", "hit fucking hard" and win. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First off, I'd recommend taking this. It's very effective when you're feeling hot and bothered whilst discussing a topic:

ChillPill%20Bringitback.net.jpg

Taken it yet? Good! Now we can continue.

 

-------------

 

I'm not falling into any fallacies here. I'm merely saying that the first thing you're taught in any combat situation is to not turn your back on an opponent. Now, even capoeiristas abide by this rule; when performing a technique, it is drilled into you to keep your eyes on your opponent. Am I incorrect on this matter?

Now, let's go back to the video. What is the first thing the capoeirista did?

A fighter that does not take the opportunity to attack when his opponent's back is turned is, simply put, not an effective fighter. There is no way around this, so don't even try.

 

I'm not even going to address the second paragraph. It is clear that you did not read my entire post.

Let me even highlight a specific topic:

 

 A capoeirista who trains to hurt you will probably be able to hurt you fucking hard. (these are the few who train in capoeira for MMA)

A capoeirista who trains to play a game with you will most likely not be able to hurt you fucking hard. (these are the vast majority of capoeiristas.)

 

Now that we have that covered, I'd like to remind you that I am not someone who has no experience at the game of Capoeira. I trained with Abolicao for the same length that you've trained. I very much enjoyed my time there, but as someone who specifically likes training for combat, capoeira didn't keep me for long.

 

I feel as though you're arguing with me based on what you think I'd say based on what I actually said.

In my last post, am I doubting the combat capabilities of the martial art of capoeira? No.

I am merely saying that you get what you train for. Train for combat, you'll be a good fighter. Train for sport, you'll be a good sportsman. I do not see how anybody could disagree with me about this.

The same applies to boxing, my primary sport. If I spent eight years in a fitness gym learning some fitness boxing program, I'll be very fit and toned, but I will not know how to use boxing in combat. Only by learning how to box against people can I be considered a good boxer.

 

Now, a question to you.

Have you ever been in a combat situation? Inside a ring, maybe? It's okay if you haven't, but I suggest you try it. It's a very... shocking experience, for lack of a better term.

 

***Have you read my entire post? Not just little bits of it, like last time? If so, feel free to reply!***

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now