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Very new to bodyweight and training in general


Djaaz

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Hi guys, I'm new around here, and I would like your precious advice. I've been following the Start Bodyweight routine for 3 weeks now

 

http://www.startbodyweight.com/p/some-sample-custom-programs.html

(Simple weight loss program (6 days a week):

 
DAY 1: Start Bodyweight basic routine (modified to: 3 sets of 8-12 reps ; 60s rest between sets)
DAY 2: 35 min steady state cardio, stretches
DAY 3: Start Bodyweight basic routine (modified to: 3 sets of 8-12 reps ; 60s rest between sets)
DAY 4: 35 min cardio (on rowing machine) including 3 sets of tabata intervals (3 sets of 8x 20s efforts, with 10s rest in between); stretches
DAY 5: Start Bodyweight basic routine (modified to: 3 sets of 8-12 reps ; 60s rest between sets)
DAY 6: 35 min steady state cardio; stretches
DAY 7: rest day.
 
For those who don't know, the basic routine is: 
 
EXERCISE
SETS/REPS/TIME
10 min
Appropriate variation from squat progression
3 sets of between 4 and 8 repetitions;
Rest between one and 2 min between sets
Appropriate pull up variation
3 sets of between 4 and 8 repetitions;
Rest between one and 2 min between sets
3 sets of between 4 and 8 repetitions;
Rest between one and 2 min between sets
3 sets of between 4 and 8 repetitions;
Rest between one and 2 min between sets
(alternate between the two with  every session)
3 sets of between 4 and 8 repetitions;
Rest between one and 2 min between sets
3 sets of between 4 and 8 repetitions;
Rest between one and 2 min between sets
Appropriate plank variation
one plank between 30s and 60s
10 min
 

 

If you notice, the only change from the basic routine to the weight loss routine is the number of reps that is increased (8-12 vs. 4-8).

 

Now browsing NF today I came across something totally different that made me consider if I was doing the right thing. Let me explain: When I do the basic routine I just do 10 push ups, then rest for 60 secs, then 10 push ups, rest 60 secs and a final set of 10 push ups. Then I go to the next exercise and repeat the same pattern.

 

What I saw on NF today was this: http://www.nerdfitness.com/blog/2009/12/09/beginner-body-weight-workout-burn-fat-build-muscle/

 

Where it is mentionned to do ''each exercise in succession without a break in between (if you’re able).  Once you’ve finished all exercises in the circuit, you do it again.  If you’re still able after the 2nd run through, go for a third.''

 

My question is: Am I doing the right thing with the Start Bodyweight Routine? Did I misunderstand something? Am I supposed to do this guy's routine the same way it is described on NF? Because I've also read an article here that once you finish your workout, ''if you're not sweating it's because you didn't push hard enough'' (or something similar)...There's the problem with my method, I'm not sweating at all! I mean I know I work hard, I can feel it, my heart rate goes up, but the resting period is so long that at the end of the workout, even though I can feel my muscles being sore, I don't really have the impression that I've worked hard enough and I feel that I have done more resting than training...

 

So what do you think? Am I doing something wrong?

 

Thanks for reading the long post and thanks for your knowledge.

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Though Steve Kamb doesn't come right out and say it, the NF routine you're looking at is a circuit training routine. Circuit training tends not to build strength very well. Either one will burn calories well.

If one of your main goals is strength, stick with the Start Bodyweight routine. It's a good one.

Cowardly Assassin
Training Log | Challenges: Current8th, 7th, 6th, 5th, 4th, 3rd, 2nd, 1st

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Though Steve Kamb doesn't come right out and say it, the NF routine you're looking at is a circuit training routine. Circuit training tends not to build strength very well. Either one will burn calories well.

If one of your main goals is strength, stick with the Start Bodyweight routine. It's a good one.

 

I'm glad you've answered this PaulG... I'm trying to stay away from this question as I designed the Start Bodyweight routine, and my answer is obviously going to be partial. I'd just like to point out however, that there is really no relation between sweating during a workout and building strength.

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I'm glad you've answered this PaulG... I'm trying to stay away from this question as I designed the Start Bodyweight routine, and my answer is obviously going to be partial. I'd just like to point out however, that there is really no relation between sweating during a workout and building strength.

Also a good point on the sweating, I missed that one. Sweating a lot just means you have to hydrate more, it doesn't mean you're getting more out of a workout.

I wasn't familiar with your routine until you started posting around here recently, but I think it's good. It's tough to find bodyweight routines as a beginner, I was not able to, I had to do a shit-ton of research and rack up some mistakes and minor injuries along the way.

OP, you will eventually modify the routine as you get more specific goals, but you won't have to change it much. It's a good template for your first couple months or more.

Cowardly Assassin
Training Log | Challenges: Current8th, 7th, 6th, 5th, 4th, 3rd, 2nd, 1st

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Thanks for your replies guys, I will stick to the way I'm doing it.

 

El Diablo, I really like this routine and your site; it is very demonstrative, the progressions are fun and easy to follow from the early stages to the more complex or advanced positions (ex.:chair squat to pistol squats). I like the fact that it doesn't discriminate beginners and that it can also serve the more advanced people.

 

If I need more challenge in the future I may try to do it ''circuit training'' style and bump the heart rate a little bit (once I am comfortable with the moves and progressions).

 

Thanks!

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Let's just say Steve wasn't very good at programming bodyweight strength training. The Batman Bodyweight workout is a good routine if you're looking at stuff from NF (though it's technically from GMB), but the Start Bodyweight programme is good, though if you're new it's a bit much with the cardio added. Small steps.

Quare? Quod vita mea non tua est.

 

You can call me Phi, Numbers, Sixteen or just plain 161803398874989.

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Thanks, I did not see the Batman routine. I will stick with El Diablo's routine for now as it I find it very gentle (I have back pain/injuries history and I don't want to stop training because I wanted to move too fast into something else) and once I'm more familiar with the moves and more confident with my body and my new strength I will probably give it a try.

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Just to be sure, does the Start Bodyweight training burns calories and fat as the BBWW in the site? I really am a fan of bodyweight exercises, but my main goal right now is burning body fat. Thnks!

 

One of the effects of strength training is that by increasing your muscle mass, you also increase your basal metabolic rate.

So, whilst you may not burn as many calories during a session compared to doing cardio, you will end up burning more throughout the day.

I don't have the specific links, but quite a few studies have shown that the most effective protocol for weight loss was actually to combine strength training and cardio.

There's a weight loss routine on my site under 'sample custom programs', though it is quite demanding and not suitable for newcomers to exercise... It can easily be adapted though.

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And I will also second the Batman Bodyweight routine. It looks solid to me.

x3

Probably the best into to intermediate BW programming out there.

But its not for beginners. You should have a solid all around strength base before moving to that sort of work.

I came up with my routine before the Batman workout came out but it is fairly similar to my routine, and I've been doing my routine (obv with lots of tweaks along the way, general framework has been the same) for more than 18 months now.

currently cutting

battle log challenges: 18,17,16,15,14,13,12,11,10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1

don't panic!

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One of the effects of strength training is that by increasing your muscle mass, you also increase your basal metabolic rate.

FIFY

 

The metabolism raising effect is real.  The explanation why is not.

 

It is a good explanation for convincing scared women to strength train with real resistances, it seems to make logical sense.  And it does technically raise your metabolism when you build muscle mass, so there is a degree of truth, though the amount is so pathetically small its irrelevant.

 

What does occur is that the calorie burn of strength training has two components: performance and recovery.  People by and large think only of the calorie cost of performance and totally neglect the calorie cost of recovery.  For most cardio and other easy exercise, that recovery cost is irrelevant.  For strength training the calorie cost of recovery is significant.  And the stronger you get, the more expensive it is.  If you keep yourself in a trained state (always recovering from strength training to a degree), you can expect to see a 5-15% rise in your apparent metabolism.  

 

What generally occurs is that people start training and they stop losing weight (or the rate slows).  What is occurring is a masking effect where the intra-muscle energy systems start storing more and more gas (creatine-phosphate and glycogen) to fuel this new exercise you are regularly doing, storing water and making the muscles firm to the touch.  Eventually these systems reach their max potential (takes about 1-2 months), then all of a sudden weight loss kicks into overdrive, as the metabolism raising effect of being in constant recovery was totally masked.  The obvious bigger muscles supercharged metabolism, whallah; well, not really, because it is a beginner-only effect, but it makes a cool story, but neither the "muscle gain" or the metabolism raising effects will continue to increase once that trained state is achieved.  Stop training and you pee away all the new muscle and the apparent metabolism raising effects.

 

Actually building muscle; bulking, does have its own metabolism raising effect independent of muscle gain.  Adaptive thermogenesis.  The body adapts to a persistent energy intake to either conserve or burn off calories.  Cutting causes metabolism to decline, bulking causes it to rise.  To a much greater degree than muscle gain/loss would predict.  There a a few mechanisms behind this; unconcious movement (fidgeting) and (most likely) BAT, brown fat gain/loss.

  • Like 2

currently cutting

battle log challenges: 18,17,16,15,14,13,12,11,10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1

don't panic!

Link to comment

FIFY

 

The metabolism raising effect is real.  The explanation why is not.

 

It is a good explanation for convincing scared women to strength train with real resistances, it seems to make logical sense.  And it does technically raise your metabolism when you build muscle mass, so there is a degree of truth, though the amount is so pathetically small its irrelevant.

 

What does occur is that the calorie burn of strength training has two components: performance and recovery.  People by and large think only of the calorie cost of performance and totally neglect the calorie cost of recovery.  For most cardio and other easy exercise, that recovery cost is irrelevant.  For strength training the calorie cost of recovery is significant.  And the stronger you get, the more expensive it is.  If you keep yourself in a trained state (always recovering from strength training to a degree), you can expect to see a 5-15% rise in your apparent metabolism.  

 

What generally occurs is that people start training and they stop losing weight (or the rate slows).  What is occurring is a masking effect where the intra-muscle energy systems start storing more and more gas (creatine-phosphate and glycogen) to fuel this new exercise you are regularly doing, storing water and making the muscles firm to the touch.  Eventually these systems reach their max potential (takes about 1-2 months), then all of a sudden weight loss kicks into overdrive, as the metabolism raising effect of being in constant recovery was totally masked.  The obvious bigger muscles supercharged metabolism, whallah; well, not really, because it is a beginner-only effect, but it makes a cool story, but neither the "muscle gain" or the metabolism raising effects will continue to increase once that trained state is achieved.  Stop training and you pee away all the new muscle and the apparent metabolism raising effects.

 

Actually building muscle; bulking, does have its own metabolism raising effect independent of muscle gain.  Adaptive thermogenesis.  The body adapts to a persistent energy intake to either conserve or burn off calories.  Cutting causes metabolism to decline, bulking causes it to rise.  To a much greater degree than muscle gain/loss would predict.  There a a few mechanisms behind this; unconcious movement (fidgeting) and (most likely) BAT, brown fat gain/loss.

FYI the correct spelling is "voilà" rather than "whallah".

Quare? Quod vita mea non tua est.

 

You can call me Phi, Numbers, Sixteen or just plain 161803398874989.

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Hey there,

 

I've been following the same routine myself. What exactly are your goals with this routine? Weight loss, endurance or strength gain?

All three of those! I've lost 22 pounds already without the workout, I intend to lose another 10 pounds and hope to reduce BF% in the process. I also want to start gaining strength...Well, I think it's all gonna go by itself as I stick to the routine...I'm following El Diablo's routine for weight loss now, gonna stick with it for another 4 weeks (I'm 4 weeks in already) and then switch to his strength routine (the initial unmodified routine) and I'll keep doing cardio on rest days....Well, I don't know if I'm clear enough, but roughly I want to gain strength, lose fat (and weight ) and gain endurance!

 

FYI the correct spelling is "voilà" rather than "whallah".

Thank you, since I'm french, I was wondering what ''whallah'' was supposed to mean! But I know a lot of english people don't write it properly (just like me, english is my second language) so errors are accepted!

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Sounds decent, but you can't do all 3 at once. 

I'd say:

 

1) Keep up with cardio to condition yourself - at least 20-30 mins for 4 days - Steady state is fine, you don't need to any intense training

2) Stick to the normal routine of 4-8 reps for strength gain

3) Once you get to a decent level (Level 5-8 on progressions) then you should change to 8-12 reps for a while

Half-Orc Ranger in training - Level 2

STR: 4 STA: 2 DEX: 2 CON: 0.5 WIS: 2 CHA: 1

 

[1 [Current Challenge]

 

Accountabilibuddies DAI-GURREN BRIGADE

 

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Hey guys,

 

My plan right now is as follows (some changes happen because life happens but I try really hard to stick to it most of the time):

 

D1:Start bodyweight routine (fat burn routine)

D2:Focus T25 cardio

D3:Start bodyweight routine

D4:Focus T25 cardio

D5:Start bodyweight routine

D6:Rest

D7:Rest

 

Now, while I truly enjoy the Start Bodyweight routine, I'm getting tired of Focus T25...I was wondering if it is possible to alternate the start bodyweight routine and the beginner bodyweight circuit presented on NF?

 

It kinda targets the same muscles groups so I'm not sure if I should do that or not? 

 

I don't really like doing cardio and this routine appeals me so I'd like to give it a try to boost the heart rate a little bit during the off-bodyweight training days...at least until I get on my bike later this spring.

 

What do you think?

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