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MedicTWO

Why are you a Veggie/Vegan?

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Hey everyone!

 

Just wondering why you choose to be vegetarian or vegan? I understand there are many reasons for choosing to not eat meat.

 

I myself am a pescetarian for the most part though I do tend to eat some hunted wild game. I don't want to eat factory raised animals and avoid animal testing where possible. Constantly I am leaning more and more towards becoming a vegan.

 

This isn't a thread to judge you for your choices I just am curious

 

~MedicTWO

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Fundamental respect for all life, and all living things. I cannot grasp the idea of eating something that I couldn't harvest myself, and I know for a fact that I cannot take the life of another being.

 

Oh, and the environmental ramifications of the meat and dairy industry keep me going, too! There are a ton of reasons to be Vegan, but those are my biggest!

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I'm a pescetarian too. Trying to cut out fish, dairy, eggs completely. I only eat animal products when I eat out. I made the change because of how screwed up the animal industry is. We live in a time where we don't need to eat meat to survive. So, I avoid meat, leather, make-up tested on animals, etc. I've learned to love pleather! :D

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     Personally I stopped eating it out of respect and compassion for living things. I am a follower of Krishna and it justmade sense to me. Why should something have to die so I can live? The reality is we are smart enough to know we can live without killing animals but like an addict it is just so good to the majority that they choose not to see the alternatives. The majority is so stuck in their ways that they choose to try and claim vegetarians and vegans have an eating disorder. Thankfully I have never run across such a person in life but have run into them on forums in the past.

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I actually became a vegetarian accidentally.  The progression went something like this:

  • Eliminate beef from diet to cut calories and lose weight
  • Discover that I have lost the ability to digest beef 
  • Start volunteering with parrots (3 lb/1 Kilo naked birds)
  • Develop a desire to eat less poultry
  • Start trying to eat veg 2-3 times per week
  • Realize you forgot to plan a meal containing meat this week
  • Swear off of poultry
  • Figure out "Crap, I'm a vegetarian"
  • Roll with it.  

 

I'm happy with my diet, and I'm aware of the ethical considerations, but I've seen too many people swear off of animal protein for ethical reasons then watch their diets become terrible since "french fries are veg", "chips are veg", "candy is veg".  

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     That is a great progression, love the parrot part. Probably easier than when I cold turkeyed all processed foods, meats, soda, cigarettes, alchohol, dairy, anything else in there not vegan or fitting what I wanted out of life, all at once. Needless to say rough transition for me and shocking to everyone who knew me.

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Food has always been my kryptonite, so when I started losing weight I changed up my diet to a natural, whole foods diet.  Little did I know, but I had gone paleo without knowing it (until I started reading this site).  It was such a HUGE effort to do so, that by the time it became a habit, I realized how easy it would be to just go vegan.  It's something I've always wanted to do as an animal lover.  I'd rather not have to eat another animal or animal product.

 

I suppose I could've just said that I had ethical reasons.  :P

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It's a work in progress, as I'm now about 90% veg.

 

I did the weight loss part, but I think I lost too much too fast and rescued myself with a bacon cheeseburger. I never really jumped on the animal rights wagon (hey, I live in Kansas; meat is big industry here), but still found myself back to meat and other animals, even after knowing all the farming practices.

 

My big turn came a little over a year ago. My dad and older brother had had skin cancer removed, but my brother's had found its way into his intestine. As much was removed as was possible, but it was still growing. Doctors gave him six months. He and his wife found a great deal of evidence about a pH balanced, vegan diet having effects on this particular kind of cancer, and over a year later, the cancer has not only stopped growing, it is reversing itself.

 

My reason? I won't be next.

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It's a work in progress, as I'm now about 90% veg.

 

I did the weight loss part, but I think I lost too much too fast and rescued myself with a bacon cheeseburger. I never really jumped on the animal rights wagon (hey, I live in Kansas; meat is big industry here), but still found myself back to meat and other animals, even after knowing all the farming practices.

 

My big turn came a little over a year ago. My dad and older brother had had skin cancer removed, but my brother's had found its way into his intestine. As much was removed as was possible, but it was still growing. Doctors gave him six months. He and his wife found a great deal of evidence about a pH balanced, vegan diet having effects on this particular kind of cancer, and over a year later, the cancer has not only stopped growing, it is reversing itself.

 

My reason? I won't be next.

     Well I have always heard a vegan diet could reverse things like that but I never took it on faith. Then again when a person knows all the crap they put into livestock it is not really hard to believe not eating it wouldn't be healthier.

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     Well I have always heard a vegan diet could reverse things like that but I never took it on faith. Then again when a person knows all the crap they put into livestock it is not really hard to believe not eating it wouldn't be healthier.

And it really is different for each person. I've heard paleo experts tout the same results. It really depends on individual cases. It is something that is in my family, so I may be susceptible to it as well.

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And it really is different for each person. I've heard paleo experts tout the same results. It really depends on individual cases. It is something that is in my family, so I may be susceptible to it as well.

     Hmm something to keep in mind I suppose. Never did hear anyone on the paleo side go on about similar results but can't really say it surprises me either. You remove all the processed foods from a persons diet and I can't say that bad things will happen.

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     Hmm something to keep in mind I suppose. Never did hear anyone on the paleo side go on about similar results but can't really say it surprises me either. You remove all the processed foods from a persons diet and I can't say that bad things will happen.

Right on. I hear vegans and paleos arguing, but they really have a lot in common: fruits, veggies, nuts and seeds are your friends; anything packaged is not.

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Right on. I hear vegans and paleos arguing, but they really have a lot in common: fruits, veggies, nuts and seeds are your friends; anything packaged is not.

     I choose not to argue with them as they have very good points for why paleo is the better choice but at the same time vegans have just as many good reasons on why their diet is better. So long as no one is getting sick and they remain healthy I see no reason to argue the differences. It is a pointless debate over semantics and in the end the whole point of being vegan or paleo is to live a healthier life. Forget the semantics and the small detail differenced and bask in the glory that is health.

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I actually became a vegetarian accidentally.  

 

Yup, this strikes a chord and is similar to my own story. I've been a vegetarian since last summer after a life-time of eating meat, a few vegetables every now and again, and hardly any fruits.

Last summer, I ended up not eating much at all for about a week, for various reasons (work stress, real life issues) and eventually ended up in some sort of crisis mode that saw me sleeping essentially non-stop for a few days. When I eventually emerged from my bedroom, I was super hungry, but somehow couldn't face eating meat (even the smell made me a little nauseous), so I figured I'll try veggie food for a while. I liked it and, although I did have meat a few times in the following weeks, found that I was happier cutting it out completely.

I challenged myself to try vegetables and fruits I hadn't eaten since I was a child or even never eaten before. I liked a lot of them, others not so much. I started to read more about vegetarian and vegan diets and, in the process, started to prepare more food myself rather than getting take-aways or eating out.

As time went on, I felt more energised than ever before, so I obviously continued to roll with it. I'm currently vegetarian as in I don't eat meat or fish/seafood. I still eat dairy every now and again, but I'm working on reducing that to see how a vegan diet will suit me.

 

I don't really go in for "save the world" arguments when it comes to turning vegetarian. It's a personal choice for me, nothing I expect anybody else to buy into, but also nothing I expect anybody to criticise me for.

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I gradually made the transition over the last couple years.  I am not 100%, because planning for that is a bit too stressful.  After reading a couple plant based nutrition books, I started training for a marathon on a plant based diet.  I noticed less gas, bloating, and quicker recovery than before.  There also is a lot of research that point towards higher rates of preventable diseases with higher consumption of animal products.  

 

I don't think paleo is an unhealthy diet, but I think it places too much emphasis on animal protein, or at least all the people that I have seen following that diet.  

 

Some good resources:  Eat to Live by Dr. Joel Furhman, Thrive by Brendan Brazier.

 

There also is a question of sustainability and quality.  We use way too many resources on raising livestock, and the calories received vs calories spent on raising livestock is horribly inefficient.  

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I started off as an accidental vegetarian, because I never found the time or desire to cook meats but stuck to eggs and dairy and loaded on grains, fruit & veggies. I then learned how the meat industry mistreated its livestock and thought it was wrong, becoming an ethical vegetarian. Unfortunately, I realized one day that the meat, dairy & eggs industries are all pretty much the same and by buying eggs & dairy, I was supporting the very thing I was against. After that I just ate meat & whatever else because there was no getting around the system & veganism seemed too expensive.

 

I made the switch the veganism almost 2 months ago because I could no longer live with being part of the problem and my excuse was just plain lazy lol. Now I do it also for the environment as well, though I will eat any meat that I know has been hunted in a humane fashion or any fish I catch myself (both which are rare).

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I became vegetarian when I was 10 because I loved animals in that obsessive way that only a 10 year old can. I collected plastic dog figurines, relocated gnarly spiders, and cried every time I saw roadkill. When I was 13 I was introduced to PETA, and began reading about the horrors of factory farming. I am not a fan of PETA these days, but it was certainly influential, and I became vegan.

 

As Jarach said, the meat, dairy, and egg industry are very connected and kind of all one in the same. The dairy industry feeds the veal industry... 'spent' dairy cows are slaughtered... male chicks born into the egg industry are culled. And though it wasn't my initial motivation, environmental concerns bolstered my resolve to avoid animal products.

 

A few years ago I started getting lazy and a degree of apathy set in. I'd eat a little cheese here, an egg or two there, until I realized I was no longer vegan. I'm actually still in this place, but I think it's time to reassess and start living/eating in a way that's more resonant with me. For me, that means no meat and no dairy, and only eggs from my own or friends' chickens. I don't think eating animals is inherently wrong-- but the way they're abused, exploited, and treated like inanimate objects is.

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I first cut out red meats about ten years ago.

 

Four years ago I decided to go vegetarian for a week. Loved it. It stuck. 

 

A year later, I tried veganism for a week. Had very little difficulty and decided to keep it up. I love how I feel eating plant-based foods. Also, I just really love animals and can't stand the idea of eating one. 

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I became a vegetarian about three years ago for health and moral reasons. In the years before that I already ate very little meat, only once or twice a week.

 

Just like most of you I cannot approve of what the meat, dairy, and egg industry do to animals - or "livestock" - and I certainly do not want to support them. Also I  don't want to eat something that has been stuffed with antibiotics and such - just doesn't sound healthy to me.

And as a college student with only a part-time job I have to live off a very limited budget, so I can't afford the really good stuff right now. Plus, there are 4 more mouths I have to feed (3 rodents, 1 dog). And of course for them the same applies. So, after organic regional grains and veggies for the rats and high-quality dog food (grass-fed beef, no grains, no added sugar and vitamins, etc.) there's not much money left for me to buy high-quality meat. So, I decided to stick organic free-range eggs from local farmers and dairy from grass-fed cows when I can afford them (usually 3-4 times a week). But I'm thinking about starting to eat meat again once or twice a week when I can afford the really good high-quality stuff.

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I am about 80% vegan currently as I am slowly cutting out everything else. I have only just started (I think I'm maybe 3 months in to being vegetarian). Although it started ages ago for me. I started by cutting out milk as my skin didn't like me drinking it, from then on I fell through health websites on to websites about the dairy industry and factory farming. It's taken me a couple of years to get to this point where I have cut out meat completely, but I figured - why eat something that gives me more joy when it's alive than dead? If I can't bring myself to eat my dog why would I eat a pig that is smarter than him? Why raise animals just to kill them for our benefit?

I'm glad I am where I am now!

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Just before my son was born I got all soul-searchy.. I decided that I've been eating meat and stuff because it was "normal" and I love animals and pretty much all of Earth's weird little monsters so I decided to stop eating them. Recently I've decided to only use cruelty-free products, but still eat eggs and dairy, which I feel guilty about.. Soon, I'll try to phase that out too. 

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I don't like the taste of meat and haven't since I was around age 5.

Most people assume I'm a vegetarian because of animal rights reasons, and proceed to ridicule me for it. Some animal rights motivated vegetarians bother me, because I feel like they don't really understand what it is to not physically be able to eat meat.

Being vego has been the bane of my existence for so long. I grow tired of the interrogative questions when I go out to dinner. I hate feeling "special" because I have to ask the chef to make something for me - I live in Australia, everyone eats meat here, in everything (even in typically vegetarian dishes...). I once asked for a meatless pasta at a restaurant and they refused. The next time someone exclaims "well there's lots of salad!" when I go to a BBQ I'm going to crack.

I will force myself to eat eggs, but some days I just can't do it and the smell alone makes me want to gag. I wouldn't class myself as vegan though as I love dairy products too much. I could drink a litre of milk a day.

My mother to this day still asks me if I want a piece of meat when she cooks it -_-

People assume I'm healthy, I'm really not. I actually dread when I have to eat because proper vego food is expensive and I never know what to make.

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I became a pescetarian over three years ago after watching Earthlings and Food, Inc. For me, it's not really an animal rights thing -- after all, I'm still eating fish (for cultural reasons) and consuming other animal products, not to mention that since I own a cat, meat is a necessity in my home -- but more a distaste for the meatpacking industry, which I have learned from these documentaries and a few books has changed very little since the days of Upton Sinclair's The Jungle. These documentaries and books are also the reason why I started focusing on eating an all-natural, no-GMO diet, too. (And yes, I do research on the brands of food I ought to be feeding my cat based on my own morals re: this subject. It's not perfect, but it's better than feeding him roadkill and poison!)

 

I'll admit, though, that when I travel to another country, or when my parents cook for me over holidays, I give in and eat meat, but I try to avoid it otherwise. I say I'm at a 90% success rate outside of travel and holidays!

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I became a vegetarian when I was 12 because I always hated the taste of meat and I had just seen a PETA video when I told my parents that I would never eat meat ever again. Which they awesomely respected!

 

So, the reasons I am still vegetarian after 13 years is that, yes,  I hate the taste. Also, I love animals and I can't bear the thought of killing them. I believe in equality for all living beings. I love the way it also helps the environnement and I just think that being vegetarian/vegan is the best thing I can do to try and be the best person I can be.

 

 

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