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Why I like getting punched/kicked.... GO!

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Okay I'm bored.  We need some interesting discussion here fighters.

 

The other night in Muay Thai we were doing some dutch sparring.  I love it at the start of class.  It's great to get everything working together - the mental piece, the combo, the limbs, getting a good feel for your partner.  In some ways, I like it better than pad work.

 

Today, I'm thinking about something else I'm about to do and found myself repeating something I often say "If I could get kicked and punched by my coaches for several rounds, I got this..."

 

So my question to you fighters.... why do you like getting punched or kicked? or thrown or whatever.

 

I like it because it reminds me I can stand up to things when the going seems tough.  It's not easy to get a punch in the face, even a training punch.  To know I can do that gives a little daily dose of mental toughness.

 

I like it because it reminds me to be humble.  If I get punched, I probably made an opening - gotta fix that, work on that, think about that. 

 

GO!

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Though on a hiatus right now, the immediate thought was always, "I just lasted x mins before the tap" or "it took twice as long for the darkness to set in on that choke than last time".

 

The main reason is to realize that for every time I submit I am learning and at 375 lbs I am doing something so many others will never try or experience.

 

The mat is one of the few places I have found in my life that I feel at peace, and the one thing that I want to prove myself to.

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I don't. It's why I retired and just lift weights now.

 

awwww... come back!  I'll kick you but I'll be gentle.

 

Oh and I lift weights too.  What a fun combo. 

 

I've tried to mesh the two.  For example, I'll body kick you while you squat...

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Yes fight club. Fantastic movie. It's true too, that quote, recently I feel I've lapsed back into the feeling I'm made of glass bit (I used to kickboxing a lot but I dropped out) and it's not really that great. I'm hoping to get back into it.

Still, best exercise ever we used to do at my dojo was crunches conditioning. You're doing crunches, someone else is sitting on your knees. Every time you lift yourself up, bam a one two to the core.

You'd feel it by the end and it was the absolute best kind of soreness in the world.

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Since judo has no striking, I guess it's down to the throws. Getting thrown isn't so bad once you know how to properly break fall and take the throw. Sometimes though it can still hurt and sometimes it can be a little scary, especially when you first start but really it's not so bad.

 

There's a quote that I saw and liked regarding judo. I can't remember how exactly it goes, but it's something along the lines of "In judo, we learn to pick ourselves up", that makes a lot of sense to me. I believe this is true. 

 

At first there's something very demoralising, almost embarrassing about being thrown to the ground and then being at someone's feet, looking up to that person whilst you're on your back. Having to get up and then most likely be thrown again? I believe that strengthens you mentally. It makes you tougher. It also strengthens your body too. 

 

However, it does suck when you get thrown by someone who has little to no control over their technique. That's frustrating and can be painful. 

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It helps me laugh at myself.  Along with tripping up or doing something similarly klutzy (even if I get hurt), I often find myself laughing as if watching a slapstick comedy in those times.  Looking the fool means I'm probably entertaining someone else, and giving them a bit of happiness.

 

As a kid (this going right up until days of uni) I was the worst of the worst among sore losers.  I would almost guaranteed throw a tantrum at some point during any competitive sport, team or otherwise.  I gave up on joining in board games because I would ragequit about a third of the way through when the progress hinted that I wasn't guaranteed victory.  For a long time I had to avoid competition just to be bearable as a person.  I was also ridiculously self-conscious about just about everything.

 

I don't know when something clicked about just how stupid that was, but it did.  Especially as a beginner in boxing, there's such a sense of "well DUHH I'm gonna face a lot of losses", I can take it as the path to progress.  When I get hit, which happens a LOT at this current stage, I'm reminded of my humanity.

 

Also, a bit of physical danger makes me feel alive, and grateful to be so.

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If you don't practice getting hit in the face, you never experience that sensation. If you don't practice that and get to know that feeling, it can be paralyzing, and that's dangerous.

Plus back when I was training at the mma training camp, all of that, beating the hell out of each other, really brought us all closer together. You get a feeling of comraderie and that little bit of stability it provides, the routine of going and seeing these people x days a week, every day, whatever, it serves as a good path marker in our otherwise chaotic lives. And that's happened at every place I've ever trained: tae Kwon do, kickboxing, mma, bjj, judo.

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I totally agree - I learned a lot from the "laugh at yourself" and "pick yourself back up" times.  Including the other night - which involved some laughing.

 

And the comraderie - man, it's awesome. 

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"I've never felt more confident, and people could spot it from a mile away. And as for this, the violence? I gotta be honest - it grew on me. Once you've taken a few punches and realize you're not made of glass, you don't feel alive unless you're pushing yourself as far as you can go."

 

I don't do martial arts, but rugby's like this for me (I am considering taking up boxing, but rugby does such a good job of beating me up..). It's one of those things where you can never be too strong or too fast, and you can always push yourself harder, and ya, I feel alive while I'm playing.

 

Also, the fact that I play a sport that scares grown men has definitely had an impact on my self-esteem/self-confidence. There's just something about the look on a big guy's face when they realize that the 5'3" girl they're talking to plays rugby. And yes, it's full contact. No, there's no padding. (It was even better with the beauty of black eye I got last summer).

 

Plus back when I was training at the mma training camp, all of that, beating the hell out of each other, really brought us all closer together. You get a feeling of comraderie and that little bit of stability it provides, the routine of going and seeing these people x days a week, every day, whatever, it serves as a good path marker in our otherwise chaotic lives. And that's happened at every place I've ever trained: tae Kwon do, kickboxing, mma, bjj, judo.

 

This too, especially being back at university this year. Helped keep me sane.

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It's the look on my partner's face when they realize that they touched me good. In our dojo our sensei has been stressing the art of timing attacks, before, during and after, your opponents attack. Especially when working with higher belts I try to get in during their attacks and sometimes I get tagged pretty well. The look on some of their faces is priceless.

 

Other than that it's good breath control right?

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Definitely what a few others said about feeling alive, and the feeling of confidence. Also, I never understood sports until martial arts. Now I have something to talk about with people; fighting is more or less a universal topic. Other than that I can't give one solid reason. At first, I just wanted to be able to kick the crap out of my older brothers(*ahem* mission accomplished), but now it's become such a huge part of life, that I can't stand NOT being in the ring. I recently had to take a week off to recover from a bad cold, and I found myself craving that sore, tired feeling that I always had crawling into bed.

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I hate getting punched or kicked.

 

Solution?

 

Training very good footwork and movement skill while studying martial arts principles that involve neutralizing an attack (Aikido, Taiji Quan's Hua Jin, etc). :)

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Being punched reminds me very directly of the mistake I'm making. Guard to low? slap. Feet too slow? whack. Hands way off? bang. And over and over again. It helps me to analize, but more so it helps me to release the unnatural tensness built around my body, the insecurity and alienation that my mind sometimes produces around me like a second skin that I need to burst out of, and reaffirm my own self with the natural-ness of touching and being touched, hitting and being hit, conditioning and being conditioned.

 

 

Sorry if I made no sense.

I just speak from emotions, here.

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For me it's because being hit is interesting, which makes me less apathetic in general.  Same thing with being stabbed in fencing.  Let me explain.

 

You have to pay attention to not be hit, really really focus and want to not be hit, and to win, and you become more invested in participating in the moment and the fight...  There's a lingering buzz for me, where after the bouts I end up a lot more interested in everything else in life too.  Then I walk around the world paying attention to what's around me and much less apathetic.  I become happy because the fighting has encouraged me to want to participate and be observant (so that I win and don't get smashed).  I think there is a profound connection between courage and being engaged with living life.

 

Does that sound kind of weird?

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It reminds me to keep my eyes open, keep my hands up, move my head, and to never underestimate females.

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And I kind of like the taste of blood.

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i got into MMA because i love the sport of it. i don't mind getting hit, that said i don't want to get hit either, i just get frustrated with myself when i'm not operating at my full (known) potential. but, as stated earlier, there is something special about training/sparring with your team mates. when you land or eat a good shot. or after class you guys start talking and analyzing what each other did well, and helping fix holes/gaps in the game. you probably know someone you fight with better than anyone else.

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i got into MMA because i love the sport of it. i don't mind getting hit, that said i don't want to get hit either, i just get frustrated with myself when i'm not operating at my full (known) potential. but, as stated earlier, there is something special about training/sparring with your team mates. when you land or eat a good shot. or after class you guys start talking and analyzing what each other did well, and helping fix holes/gaps in the game. you probably know someone you fight with better than anyone else.

 

That's why a lot of people who do martial arts share such strong bonds and friendships with their club mates. I know I do with people from my judo club. :) 

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