• Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

zeloschick

Looking for Information

Recommended Posts

Hello all,

 

I'll try to keep this from getting too long winded.  I recently started taking BJJ for a variety of reasons, a big one being self-defense as a woman.  I love it, I love my dojo, and I have no plans to stop going anytime soon (finances permitting).

 

As much as I like BJJ, its lacking in certain areas, and I wanted to study a style that fights off the ground (for self defense purposes and fitness, I don't really care for competition).  I managed to narrow my choices down to two, but seeing as how I'm a total newbie, I was hoping you all would help me out with some info. 

 

My dojo offers classes in 'tai-jutsu karate', which I guess is some form of mixed martial art.

 

From the website -

 

"Tai-Jitsu Karate blends traditional “stand up†punch and kick techniques with ground fighting and self-defense skills to form a single, holistic fighting system.  Our students are as proficient using a counter punch to defend against a kick, as using a drop shoulder throw to defend against a rear naked choke.  As such, Tai-Jitsu is a traditional “mixed martial art†allowing our students to defend themselves at any time, in any place.  We do not train katas or forms in Tai-Jitsu.  Rather, we focus on a series of realistic techniques, drills, and sequences that evolve as the student’s knowledge and skills improve."

 

I was also looking at Eagle Claw Kung Fu.

 

Does anyone practice/know anything about either of these two styles?

 

Thanks for your help guys!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IIRC Taijutsu was the "bodily movement/fighting" aspect of Nin-po, aka Ninjutsu.

 

I used to study Shaolin Long Fist Kung Fu, and while many of the Kung Fu styles have "eagle claw" strikes, I've never heard of an "Eagle Claw" style of Kung Fu. Not to say there isn't one, or the school isn't legit -- Kung Fu has as many styles, variations, etc as a beach has grains of sand ... most of which seem to have an origin story where a practitioner of Right-Han Kung Fu, that blocked with the left hand and struck with the right, discovered that he did better blocking with the right and striking with the left, and thus was born Left-Han Kung Fu. Or something like that.  :playful:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for your response, Hong WeiLoh.  Eagle Claw (according to wikipedia and about.com, so I can't vouch for legitimacy of the information) is supposed to be a Northern Shaolin style of kung fu, the Chinese (western alphabet) Ying Jow Pai.  It is also supposed to be rare, and not a lot of places teach it.  But considering the sources, I'll take the info with a grain of salt, and I'm not 100% sure that's what the place is teaching.

 

I'll check out the taijutsu information, thank you very much for pointing that out.  Like I said, newbie, and what I know about martial arts could fill a very small booklet with lots of large pictures.

 

As much as I would like to study Eagle Claw, I will probably end up going with the taijutsu (or keep looking at other places) simply because I had a bit of sticker shock when we discussed pricing at the kung fu place.  I understand martial arts studios can't run on hopes and dreams, but I'm not willing to pay as much as they're asking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sadly, the cost of everything is going up, not the least of which is things like tuition for martial arts. When I started Long-Fist KF in high school (mid-90s), it was $25/month for classes. Fast forward to college, Kenpo was $50/month. Looking at how much the average studio of any style wants nowadays makes my wallet hurt. On the bright side, no matter where I were to go, I can be assured that I'll be studying the best, most effective self-defense system there is. :pride:  I dunno how they can all be the best, but I'm sure there's some sorta Chi-powered dimensional thingy that lets that happen.

 

Of course, all the mortal martial arts on the planet won't protect you from a psycho chick who goes Super-Saiyan and punches through the window of your drive-thru. :biggrin-new: 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My experience with Eagle Claw is that it is more of a wu shu style (fancy, high jumps and kicks in the forms and geared towards gymnastics-like competitions) than self-defense.  I'd look closely at the school (any school, really) and instructor and be sure that the focus of the school is what you want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Martial arts is full of Dogma. You're going to find an attitude of "The way is the only way". Usually it's coincidentally the same thing the writer has studied - even if it was only for 3 months in high school.

 

I have 10+ years in M.A. Instuctorships in a couple different things, for what it's worth. I strongly suggest staying away from anything "traditional". There are a few exceptions to this but they're so far and few between it's hardly worth mentioning.

 

Stay away from anything practiced statically or in forms. Stick with places where people train in pairs - whether in drills or with focus mitts and pads. Watch a few classes before signing up anywhere. Preferable get in a few. Good schools let you try f few classes for a 'mat fee' to see if it's for you. If they don't let you watch before you sign up it's total bullshit. That's not too common anymore. If you hear an instructor say anything metaphysically silly, walk out.

 

Muay Thai is a great place to start standing up. Western boxing is decent, but only if they teach you elbows and knees - most sport gyms don't. MMA schools are much more common and often aren't bad, but the teaching skill varies wildly. They will often separate classes into standup and grappling so you can just go to stand-up classes if you want.

 

What area are you in?

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah yes, the threat of a Super-saiyan attack... somehow I don't think I'll have to worry about that one much ;)  I kind of lost track of DBZ after high school but it was still awesome.

 

Kung Fu Girl - Thanks for the input.  I definitely don't want to study Wushu at this point.  It looks like a total blast and someday I may try it, but right now its not really not the best style for my goals. 

 

Derek P - Thank you so much for your post.  You're spot on - I've run into a lot of "Ours is the best and only way to total self-defense!" type claims in my search, which is kind of annoying but I understand they're trying to drum up business.  What really sold me on BJJ when I started was that they let me take the class with the other students so I could get the full experience; the Kung Fu place gave me two private lessons.  Private lessons are great, but two in a row?  I want to see the class that I'm going to be taking to see if I like it!  That was possibly my biggest turn off for there because it makes me feel like I'm buying a car unseen, and will get stuck paying for a lemon. 

 

I live near Pittsburgh, PA so I don't have as many options as I would if I lived near a bigger city (though granted I don't know if I've necessarily found all the places nearby).  I looked at Muy Thai, and the only place that offers it is on the opposite side of the city, and with my schedule I don't think I'd be able to make any of their beginner classes with driving time added in.  I'll check around for some mixed martial arts gyms (I know there's one over by the airport, which isn't too far of a hike).  I never considered taking MMA, but I'd be willing to give it a shot.  There are a couple of boxing clubs nearby as well that I'll look into. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Martial arts is full of Dogma. You're going to find an attitude of "The way is the only way". Usually it's coincidentally the same thing the writer has studied - even if it was only for 3 months in high school.

 

I have 10+ years in M.A. Instuctorships in a couple different things, for what it's worth. I strongly suggest staying away from anything "traditional". There are a few exceptions to this but they're so far and few between it's hardly worth mentioning.

 

Stay away from anything practiced statically or in forms. Stick with places where people train in pairs - whether in drills or with focus mitts and pads. Watch a few classes before signing up anywhere. Preferable get in a few. Good schools let you try f few classes for a 'mat fee' to see if it's for you. If they don't let you watch before you sign up it's total bullshit. That's not too common anymore. If you hear an instructor say anything metaphysically silly, walk out.

 

Muay Thai is a great place to start standing up. Western boxing is decent, but only if they teach you elbows and knees - most sport gyms don't. MMA schools are much more common and often aren't bad, but the teaching skill varies wildly. They will often separate classes into standup and grappling so you can just go to stand-up classes if you want.

 

What area are you in?

^ I think this is great advice.

 

I think finding a place where training involves working with a partner is great, especially when you get to spar and attempt to use the techniques you've learned against a fully resistant opponent who is trying to do said techniques right back at you. I don't really like the look or appeal of martial arts that contain 'forms' and stuff. 

 

I've been doing judo for nearly six years now. To be honest, I can't quite tell you how effective it would be as a self defence, as I've never had to use it in a "real" situation (and hopefully I'll never have to) but I'd like to think it would be pretty good for self defence... but then again, it all comes down to the user themselves - how much they've learned, how "good" they are at it and physical fitness would be a factor in self defence too. 

 

Since Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (or BJJ) came from judo, the two arts are very similar, however BJJ specialises on the ground, judo focuses more on the stand up side of things. Judo focuses on stand up grappling and of course, using the opponent's own force/momentum against them (as well as breaking their balance in general) to throw them onto the ground. Judo also teaches practitioners how to fall onto the ground "safely" to minimise damage - backward break falls, side break falls and even rolling break falls (think parkour-style rolling). Judo also focuses on ground work ("ne-waza") which includes hold/pin downs, arm bars and chokes. The ground work, while an important aspect in judo, isn't as focused on as say it is in BJJ. I'm not very good at maths but if I were to assume numbers, I would say judo is 70% stand up and 30% ground. 

 

The only thing judo lacks though, is striking. This bothers some people, this doesn't bother some people. Striking is only featured in the Nage-No-Kata (which is for higher grades, brown belts/black belts). "Nage-No-Kata" is a demonstration sequence for brown belts/black belts, purely for grading purposes. 

 

It should be noted, there's two "versions" so to speak of judo. Olympic Judo and Kodakan Judo. 

 

Olympic Judo is the most commonly taught Judo and it's what they do in most international competitions. Olympic Judo is generally taught as a sport, with emphasis on fitness, conditioning and competition. Olympic Judo is what I train in. 

 

Kodakan Judo is more "classic" judo which focuses more on techniques and knowledge. Kodakan Judo also practices certain techniques that are considered illegal and banned in Olympic judo. 

 

What I like about judo is "randori", which means free sparring. In randori, you and your opponent pretty much grab each other and try to throw each other. You're trying to throw down a fully resisting opponent. It's a judo fight basically. We also do "randori" on the ground as well. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cr33g, thanks for your post!  I would like to study a striking art, if only for the fact that I'm already studying a grappling art.  My second reason is the striking arts can be practiced at home (yes, a sparring partner would be nice, but that is a luxury I haven't managed to find yet).  But, on the other hand I'm not ruling anything out at this point. 

 

I had looked at Judo and probably will try it down the road if I can find a school with a good instructor.  We learned a couple of Judo throws in BJJ class a few weeks ago (I have the bruises on my ribs to prove it, my partner quickly surmised I hadn't been taught how to properly fall and gave me a crash course). I absolutely loved it (though my form sucked and definitely needs work).  There was something incredibly elegant about sweeping my partner off their feet with minimal effort on my part... And when you describe your classes, it sounds a lot like the set up of the BJJ school that I go to, which makes sense since our styles are in the same family tree. 

 

We also have free-sparring.  I dislike the free-sparring at the end of class because I feel like a turtle on my back that continues to flail while getting armbarred... I'm a bit of an academic, have a bit of a passive personality, so not being given space to think of my next move is a real challenge for me.  Thinking on my feet has always been a weakness, but hopefully with practice I'll get better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're welcome, zeloschick, no problem at all. :) Sorry to throw a large response at you but uh... yeah, this might be long. 

 

Regarding striking arts, I feel there's no real 'best' martial art or anything and I'm sure it's been mentioned on this thread or you've heard it before but at the end of the day it all comes down to the user and how they use what they have learned, as well as their own general physical conditioning. I would suggest finding something that you can make time for, that you can financially afford and that you might have/develop a genuine interest in. 

 

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu usually teaches some judo throws, because again BJJ comes from judo but sometimes it depends on the club. Some clubs will do 'em often while some clubs won't, or at least will do it not very often.

 

Break falling is absolutely essential when it comes to being thrown. By learning how to break fall, you can safely fall and safely "take" the throw. Unfortunately (and no offence, I'm not trying to be rude or show any disrespect), I don't think a "crash course" in break falling is going to help, and the only reason I mention that is... bruising on the ribs? That doesn't sound right, I'm sorry. Hope you're all right, by the way. 

 

In order to learn to break fall, you should be properly taught the techniques in a 'layered' manner and you should learn all three break falls - back break falls, side break falls and rolling break falls. There is also forward break falls (where you land on your front) but you seriously don't need that. 

 

Once you've learned how to perform a break fall from a static position by yourself - without being thrown, then you can practice your break falls by being thrown - in a static, controlled manner. Once you've got the break falls correct, then (as contradicting as this may sound) the best way to practice your break falls is to be thrown. 

 

To be fair, break falling safely is a two way street between Uke (person being thrown) and Tori (person doing the throw on Uke). If Tori has terrible technique e.g. tries to rush it, is using strength over technique, is being sloppy, rough etc.  then your break falls may not help very much, which can result in you getting hurt. Good, clean technique combined with a good break fall shouldn't hurt you very much at all... sure, you might be sore the next day but that's about it. 

 

Pulling off nice, clean throws with little effort is an awesome feeling. Granted, in randori (free sparring) or competition, it's hard to pull off a clean, effortless technique against a fully resisting opponent who is trying to get you with their own techniques, but it's still possible. Furthermore in this kind of environment (randori/competition) getting thrown might hurt a little more, because it's by full force and the throw is often 'modified' for competition purposes, e.g. dropping to the floor, falling on top of you etc. 

 

Regarding the free sparring you do in BJJ (which I think they call "rolling" if I remember right) I'm not sure what advice I can offer you there. To be honest (and again, I mean no rudeness or disrespect) I don't really like the idea of going flat on your back. I know people do this to try and trap their opponent in their "guard" or "half-guard", but people have started to figure out how to get around it, how to escape from it and even how to attack people in their own guard.

 

For example: last year in 2013 I went to a local BJJ open gi-comp for the first time (never competed or trained in BJJ before) and I won two of my fights using a strangle technique called "Sode Guruma Jime" - "Sleeve Wheel Choke", in BJJ it's commonly called "The Ezekiel Choke". How did it work? Because two opponents of mine tried to pull me into their "Guard", which I purposely went into to execute this choke. I ended up getting second place/silver medal at this comp. 

 

The choke - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sode_guruma_jime 

 

Personally, I would prefer to move, to be up on my knees and not to be too far forward or too far back, to try and be 'balanced' on the ground. Grab their legs, control their legs, work your way up their body. Control yourself, control the opponent, control the situation. 

 

That all being said, free-sparring is probably the best thing about the class. It means you can take what you've learned and try and apply it on a fully resistant opponent who is trying to get you. Sure, you might lose a lot (especially as a beginner) but you learn from your mistakes, you learn from your losses and it'll make you improve. Eventually, you won't be "thinking" of what to do, you'll just kinda do it. You'll see an opportunity and without even thinking, you'll just try and take it. "Their arm is out stretched, I'll try an arm bar!" "Their chin is high in the air and their neck is exposed, I'm going to choke them!" "They're going to try and pull me into their guard? Well I'll jump on 'em and surprise them with a strangle!" - It sounds easier said than done but the longer you do it and the longer you endure it, the better you'll become for it. With technique and experience comes speed. 

 

I think that's what I like about judo's ground work... because in a judo competition, ground work is quite limited and you don't get that much time on the ground, meaning you've gotta be rough and explosive, otherwise the ref will stand you back up. In a BJJ comp though, you're on the ground for a long time, so you've got more time to think and can move slower, but it means you've gotta be careful either way. 

 

Sorry for a long post, but I hope this helps. :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to be clear - when I say "crash course", my partner (and the sensei) spent ten minutes showing me how to fall backwards so that I could be thrown safely.  Even then, my more experienced partner did not throw me hard - very gentle and slow so I had plenty of time to break fall.  It was the first, and only time I have been thrown standing up in BJJ class, and it was followed up by another (longer) lesson on break falling at a later date as my teacher realized I needed more help with it. 

 

I was exaggerating a bit about the bruised ribs; I landed hard on my side (I hadn't quite got the hang of break falling yet),and was a bit sore but I was fine after a day or two.  I was trying not to land on my elbow.  I do appreciate the time you took to write the long response, I can see you are very passionate about your art, and your knowledge is much more vast than mine about my own.  I also apologize if I offended, it was not my intention. 

 

I don't think I'm the best at describing what we do in class; there is still so much I just don't know, and I have huge gaps in my knowledge as I've only been going for about two months.  I do know I'm going to keep going because I generally have fun, I get a good workout, and I like the learning environment.  I'm slowly filling the gaps in, but its taking time for me to make the connections between what my eyes see sensei doing, and making my body mimic the movements. 

 

I'll just have to keep looking for another style that compliments my BJJ and I like performing, regardless of whether it ends up being another grappling art like Judo or a striking art like karate.  I appreciate everyone's input, and I know I've gotten a lot of good advice so I'll just have to see where I end up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I stumbled across this and I feel I should say something that others have said before: regardless of where you go, sit in on a class and make sure it seems above board.  I'd also suggest poking your head into local community centres if you haven't already.  You may be surprised what you'll find. 

 

As to the karate, may I suggest that you go in eyes open on that one.  I did a quick check, and I'm going to assume you're looking at Steel City. I also did a quick search for their style and found it listed on a yellow pages-like site as "Tai Jutsu-gen Karate" and "Tai-Jitsu Karate" on their site.  "Tai Jutsu-gen" seems to pretty much only exist related to Steel City.  "Tai-jitsu karate" isn't much better and mostly referenced French sites, which makes sense, and a German one.

 

Point being, everything points to this being very much 'their' style. Not necessarily bad, but enough to raise an eyebrow or two. The mismatch of style name raises another.

 

That and my very bad former-otaku-if-you-can-even-call-it-that Japanese (read: do NOT take my word on this, seriously) is translating 'Tai Jutsu-gen Karate' as 'Serious Martial Art Karate,' so that didn't help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The "Tai-Justsu karate" basically tells me that they've "made their own style" by mixing karate with some other stuff.

 

Tai is body, Jutsu is basically the Art or Techniques of. So basically the Techniques of Using the body.

 

Basically, The question is what kind of thing interests you. I tend to recommend Muay Thai to women looking for self defense, as it tends to be simple, effective, and unexpected in the sorts of situations they tend to be worried about. Elbows and knees are very easy to learn to strike with, and still quite effective due to the body mechanics involved.

 

Muay Thai tends to be very straight forward, and very simple. As a result some people want something more interesting. In terms of instruction vs. ability to practice. I can teach basic knee and elbow striking in an hour, and have the person able to practice a couple of boring but super-effective sticking techniques on their own for some time. It's actually much easier to learn to really hurt someone with an elbow or knee than to punch or kick. (I feel punching and kicking have more difficult technical aspects.) The difficulty would seemingly be having the confidence to get close enough to strike, but again, most women I met concerned about it were more worried about being controlled or overpowered more than just being punched, and simple but effective blocking is based on the same body movement.

 

All that being said, each art has it's pluses and minuses. I train with guys in judo that can throw really well but haven't learned how to handle strikers as it's not their art, but roll well with BJJ guys despite their rule differences. I really like Bujinkan for weapons, and working on mental flexibility, and Muay Thai for its simple efficiency. Kung Fu styles I have pretty much no experience with, but I'm not as fond of a lot of them. I prefer more natural foot and leg positions, and I like protecting the head, so I'm not big on chambered punches or large blocks (Some Karate forms too).

 

Those are my preferences though, and certainly aren't universal. All arts have their own strengths, and their own weaknesses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to be clear - when I say "crash course", my partner (and the sensei) spent ten minutes showing me how to fall backwards so that I could be thrown safely.  Even then, my more experienced partner did not throw me hard - very gentle and slow so I had plenty of time to break fall.  It was the first, and only time I have been thrown standing up in BJJ class, and it was followed up by another (longer) lesson on break falling at a later date as my teacher realized I needed more help with it. 

 

I was exaggerating a bit about the bruised ribs; I landed hard on my side (I hadn't quite got the hang of break falling yet),and was a bit sore but I was fine after a day or two.  I was trying not to land on my elbow.  I do appreciate the time you took to write the long response, I can see you are very passionate about your art, and your knowledge is much more vast than mine about my own.  I also apologize if I offended, it was not my intention. 

 

I don't think I'm the best at describing what we do in class; there is still so much I just don't know, and I have huge gaps in my knowledge as I've only been going for about two months.  I do know I'm going to keep going because I generally have fun, I get a good workout, and I like the learning environment.  I'm slowly filling the gaps in, but its taking time for me to make the connections between what my eyes see sensei doing, and making my body mimic the movements. 

 

I'll just have to keep looking for another style that compliments my BJJ and I like performing, regardless of whether it ends up being another grappling art like Judo or a striking art like karate.  I appreciate everyone's input, and I know I've gotten a lot of good advice so I'll just have to see where I end up.

 

It's all good. I'm happy you took the time to read my response and of course, I was not offended, no worries at all. :) 

 

Well, it's only been two months eh? In that case, trust me, it's going to take a while to get any good at it. Don't be discouraged, that's the fun part, improving yourself to such levels where you start to surprise yourself and your partners. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fact that you ezekial choked someone from inside of their guard tells me they weren't very experienced or you are very good at getting people completely flat on their back (and sneaky, or they weren't very aware of the threat). Decent guard players don't fight flat on their back, they're typically on one hip or another. When you're flat you can't sweep or go for subs, and are vulnerable to ground and pound and gi chokes, assuming you're in a gi. Kudos on the wins though :)

 

To the OP, I wouldn't write off boxing offhand. Beats doing kata, and you might like it. Since you're worried about self defense, most people are just going to flail their arms at you and grab your hair anyway, so boxing will help you with half of that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, being flat on the back is a very bad idea. As for this guy's experience level? I have no idea. When they began pulling me into their guard, I kinda just... okay not to sound weird, I kinda embraced it, thought "f*** it" and essentially went in with them (e.g. when they pull, you push), I was on my knees, pretty much flattened myself on top of him (perhaps I forced him to his back) and snuck my right forearm behind the back of his neck. I don't think he was aware of my strangle. 

 

I think his biggest mistake was leaving his neck exposed by having his chin up. 

Cheers on the wins, thanks man. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Taijutsu?

 

 

I'd say look for something with full-contact sparring (or at least as close to it as possible). The question of the combat effectiveness of even traditional arts are usually resolved via sparring and non-point-based competition. I used to scoff at Karate (as I only saw The Karate Kid) but I developed a newfound respect for them when we went up against a Kyokushin team. Though most of them didn't do too well with kickboxing rules, and most of us got disqualified in the Kyokushin rules, those guys could definitely scrap on their feet. (You should usually avoid face-punching without gloves anyway.)

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kcwObThOxIE

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't believe that sparring is too useful for self defense. It has it's place, but its very limited and I think people over-use it, and much too soon. Unless you've been practicing evasive head movement and footwork for at least 6 months it's too soon to learn anything from sparring - except how to flinch. And how to staunch a nose bleed. Maybe how to get to the nearest emergency room. And head movement and footwork aren't something you generally start with, though more gyms would do better if they were.

 

So many times I've seen "sparring" sessions where 2 guys sprint at each other chest first slapping at one another with modified bitch-slaps. Entertaining, but no one is learning anything except that they're not ready to spar. At a crappy school, they don't even learn that.

 

Until you get to a decent level, generally you want to train the attributes separately and plug them in at higher and higher intensity. I wouldn't even think about sparring until you can drill at full-on at 100% speed and feel comfortable. That takes a while.

 

I'm not sure sparring is really that useful for self defense unless someone is really trying to level you.

 

That said, sparring to learn how to be a ring fighter is invaluable. I still think trainers use it too much, but that's a different story for another day. And I don't train people to get into the ring so I don't consider myself a go-to guy for that information. That said, I do have enough knowledge and experience to recognize holes in a fighter's game and training.

 

Sparring is not bad for finding out what you're made of - if it's worth the risk of a broken hand, jaw, nose. For some it is and I have no problem with that.

 

Sparring is great for finding holes in your game and knowing where you should be emphasizing your training. But I can tell you right now where your holes are if you've been at a gym less than a year. (not you specifically, but the ubiquitous you)

 

Keep this in mind... What does sparring for self defense look like? "Ok, I'm going to try to rape you , and you try to tear my eyes out. Ready... GO!"

 

 

 

"If you're getting in a lot of fights, you don't need to become a better fighter, you need to get better at not getting into fights."

 

-Me, DerekP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True, rape would be the most common scenario for a woman, and anti-rape drills should be performed so they become second-nature. But I don't think self-defense training should be limited to escaping a rape choke. Women get into fights too. (Too soon?)

 

Np038qrhNCJ9.jpg

 

Due to the unpredictable nature of physical confrontation, I believe that being able to do something instead of freezing up in a high-stress situation is an asset and would significantly increase one's chances of survival. Not a lot of people have been punched on the face, and the first time is quite nerve-racking for many. Being able to act while being hit is very important, and sparring provides a controlled hostile scenario that replicates these conditions (assuming it is done correctly, of course, because I don't think we're talking about McDojos). Combat sport (ring/cage) competitors, more often than not, do well in physical altercations because they know what it feels like to be hit and refrain from panicking. I doubt people go to self-defense classes for 10 years to be a master in self-defense techniques; usually they go once a week for a year or so at most (unless there is motivation beyond "self-defense"). For the individuals with mediocre technique, pure violence of action is the most potent weapon (besides learning how to not get into that situation).

 

In the basic close-quarters combat course in the Army one of the final tests is entering a room with a large person (in protective gear) somewhere inside who may or may not attack you at any time. You do whatever it takes to get him off you and get yourself out of that situation. Because sometimes your death punch and pressure point strikes that you've been practicing for years don't work on that Haj high out of his mind on opium and religion, or that guy on bath salts thinking you're a cheeseburger, so you have to find another way to neutralize the threat.

 

highgear_large_large.jpeg?v=1309478107

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure a lot of new people end up in weird slap fights when they spar the first few times, but the point of sparring in a self defense context is to keep your students from freezing up when something really happens. It would be a shame if I spent a year trying to get a students techniques prettied up only to have something happen to them because they froze up because I never had them spar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

no one wins in a knife fight. except that dude at 1:40, who has a serious weight advantage on his opponent and dominates the shit out of the fight. though even he probably copped enough hits to wind up in hospital.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now