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crowings

Knuckle Chafe After Boxing

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Hey guys, so I just started boxing and I think it's one of the best decisions I've ever made, I love it. I do, however, have problems as far as punching goes, that is that I end up with some pretty bad knuckle chafe after working out alone. I have a pair of fairly padded gloves (though they're not specifically made for boxing, the gloves have a good amount of knuckle protection and they're not being damaged by the workout), as well as a hard board that I'm hitting (I'm a bit limited on resources, as you can probably tell). Is there something I can do to lessen the chafe, or will calluses eventually build on their own (or I just get better at technique and thus avoid chafing altogether/etc.)?

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It's chaffing because you aren't wrapping your hands. Go to a sporting goods store and buy yourself some handwraps or you'll end up with worse problems down the line. If you don't get some actual boxing gloves you'll have problems too. I suggest 16 ouncers. 

 

Sounds like you're doing some pretty ghetto training, which is fine, but at least get handwraps. They don't cost much and they'll lower your margin for error. Also, make yourself a heavy bag. There are plenty of do it yourself tutorials online, and lots of them are cheap and effective. I don't have a problem with makiwara but it doesn't sound like that's what you're doing.

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Also performing punches without wrapping your hands is gonna give you bad wrists several years down the road. My trainer can almost make music with the clicking and creaking his wrists make from years of not wearing wraps because he didn't notice any problems, he really regrets it now :D

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I would not recommend training on a board. At all.

I would not recommend hitting anything hard with less than 12-16oz gloves. Boxers train 16 oz boxing gloves. For a reason.

Handwraps prior to putting your gloves on. For a reason. For many reasons.

If you don't, you are likely to have a lot of damage in fingers, wrists, elbows.

Buy a pair of everlasts at 16oz, get a bag (they are not that expensive), get handwraps $3 on amazon).

Oh and learn to hit properly.... It's not intuitive.

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I just mean I recently got into the sport.

 

I meant are you punching some stuff alone, or are you going a boxing gym learning to box? Because there is a difference.

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Ah, well then, ditch the MacGyver bagwork. Competitive boxers baby their hands like Infantrymen baby their feet. They will take abuse, but proper abuse, not needless "if you can dodge a wrench, you can dodge a ball" abuse. If a coach is out of the question, the best thing I can come up with is taking videos of yourself and having others (and yourself) critique the form. Shadowboxing for skill. Work on virtuosity--performing the ordinary extraordinarily well. (e.g. 500 1-2 combinations a day, focusing on correct form and energy transfer first, then on speed, then on power) But if you're doing it for the exercise, you could get a hold of Bas Rutten's workout tapes.

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All right, that makes sense, thanks.

 

Buy a pair of everlasts at 16oz, get a bag (they are not that expensive), get handwraps $3 on amazon).
 

 

Unfortunately, where I live, boxing gloves are a little hard to come by. You'd also be surprised about the expenses (bags run from ~$100 for a 3" to around $170 for a 5" bag. Handwraps themselves run about $10 a pair). I'm moving next year, so everything I've got is just a temporary set up until I can do it all right.

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I'm moving next year, so everything I've got is just a temporary set up until I can do it all right.

 

This is just a suggestion, but why don't you work on your fitness and conditioning until you reach a boxing gym?

Technique is something you really have to be careful with. The last thing you want is to form bad habits before training at an actual gym. One of the guys who used to train in my gym developed an awful habit of just flicking his jab out from the elbow after learning how to jab from some YouTube video.

..and that ended up giving him a sore elbow.

I don't think he ever managed to break that habit, either.

It's really easy to form bad habits, especially in boxing. Don't fall into that trap.

 

If you build up your stamina and overall strength (but mostly stamina, you'll damn well be needing it) before you enter a gym, you'll be better off than 99% of the people who walk into a gym. You'll have plenty of time to learn proper technique and you'll find it easier to train.

 

Again, just a suggestion. Your coaches will respect you much more for having stellar conditioning before joining than having botched technique and bad habits that are a pain to work with.
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Jump rope, running (start w shorter distance), body weight work: push-ups, plank holds, etc. the better you get, you can string them together and move faster.

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My basic routine when preparing for a bout is the following:

 

1. Endurance runs.

I'd do two endurance runs in the week. Me, I'd run on Mondays and Saturdays. By endurance run, I mean 45+ minutes running time. Once you're able to run for this amount of time, start increasing the pace. 

 

2. High intensity training

It'd be good if you could do this three times a week. There are many ways to do this, but I like to do the following:

Find an open space where you can sprint, and find someone else you can run against (your friend will do). Race your friend for 50 meters, then walk back. Then race for 75, walk back. Then hundred, walk back ect.. all the way to two hundred.

It hurts. The first time I did this, I puked. However, it'll seriously get you in shape.

 

4. Skip rope.

This is one of the best conditioning exercises for boxing, period. You can get cheap ones, or you could invest a bit more and get weighted ones. Either way, they'll do a lot for you.

 

3. Strength training.

Bodyweight is the way we train in my gym. Calisthenics and Plyometrics will be your friend here, most because they're cheap to do and still effective.

Now, a common misconception is that the legs aren't as important as upper-body in boxing. This is 110% wrong; the legs are extremely important in boxing. Make sure that, when you're building a workout routine, you don't forget the legs.

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You could just get stronger with some good old-fashioned strength training.

 

Or you can work on your cardiac output, lowering your resting heart rate and having phenomenal cardio.

 

Or you could just work on some GPP stuff.

 

Unless you're Batman, there's probably room for physical improvement. Like putting all the mods on your car before eventually learning how to drive it.

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For boxing you need muscle endurance and strength both. Do jumping excercises, skipping, stength workouts. Your body should be strong and your moves need to be fast.

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I have a similar problem.  When I’m in boxing gloves I’m usually fine but when I switch to grappling gloves (I don’t box, I took Jeet Kune Do, so, this would either be doing target mitt exercises or hitting the bag a bit), saying my knuckles chaff would be kind.  I end up tearing skin off my last knuckle or popping the blood vessel in between the last two knuckles.  Ouch!  I’m hoping a better pair of gloves will help because wrapping my wrists will interfere with the punching technique, as JKD requires wrist flexibility. 

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wrapping my wrists will interfere with the punching technique, as JKD requires wrist flexibility

 

You can wrap your hands without putting much emphasis on the wrist. Boxers who favor hooks and uppercuts, for instance, may put less emphasis on how stiff their wrists are wrapped as to not mess with wrist flexibility.

 

Wraps are mostly needed because they compress the bones and tissue in the hand and prevent far more troublesome injuries than chafe. If you're going to be hitting anything hard for an extended period of time, you really should wear wraps.

I have no experience with jeet kune do, so I don't know any ways in which the practitioners of that style wrap their hands. Why don't you ask your instructor on the best way to wrap?

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I'm a huge proponent of focus mitt training. You can get used focus mitts for $25 and up, and adequate f.m. gloves for $15. You can do it without gloves, but you'll get some of the same knuckle scuffing issues, but to a much lesser extent than hitting wood. Ummm... hitting wood? You should probably stop that yesterday. You're much better off just shadow boxing. Hitting something that hurts your hands is gonna discourage your body from learning to deliver maximum force. And it's gonna impair training in the long run because you'll be spending time laid up from injured hands.

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I'm a little late here, buut to echo what Machete and Sugar ray said, conditioning. I worked out in a boxing gym for a little bit. Running, jumping rope are absolutes. Every boxer does them. Also, we had a round timer. when that bell dinged, you had to drop and do crunches until the next round started. every three minutes, no matter what you were doing. I wanted to die, lol. 

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