• Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Gnomiee

Self Taught Martial Arts?

Recommended Posts

Hey!

Im doing a lot of working out but what I want to work in is some Martial Arts exercises or training. 
Im a college student and can't afford a class right now, but what I want to do is find some exercises I can do on my own to prepare me for when I can start going to a class. 

Any ideas?
 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably the most important thing you can work on is your conditioning.  I'd be careful of practicing techniques on your own - there's a lot of subtly to martial arts, and it's easy to hurt yourself if you're not doing all the little things just right.  You don't want to build bad habits that require ages of unlearning later on, either.  So if I were you, I'd focus on my conditioning!  That way, when you start formal practice you'll be able to run circles around the other beginners.  Importantly, you'll also have enough energy to maintain form throughout the training sessions!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I would second the above comment from Jprev. Conditioning is definitely a good thing to work on solo. It should probably be your starting point, particularly if you have no one to fine-tune any techniques you try.

 

You might also want to practice moving. Not sure what you are looking to study, but i find that movement practice (from as simple as learning to walk well, through to transitioning between being on the floor and upright [and vice versa], and everything in between) is perhaps the most useful thing for me currently. Some good research in to biomechanics might help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Jprev. Without an instructor to correct you, you run the risk of developing bad habits that will take ages to correct later on. Conditioning is all you could really do to prepare and will pay off in the long run.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey!

Im doing a lot of working out but what I want to work in is some Martial Arts exercises or training. 

Im a college student and can't afford a class right now, but what I want to do is find some exercises I can do on my own to prepare me for when I can start going to a class. 

Any ideas?

 

Thanks!

 

I could recommend a few basics:

 

1. Get in shape - this means a lot of body weight or free weight exercises

2. Get flexible - lots of books and programs about this. try youtube, but be careful of your own limits

3. Work on boxing combos - again you tube is your friend. Basic strike combos: jab-cross, hook-uppercut, etc

 

Then, after you graduate, join a dojo and get ready to feel the frustration of knowing you've been doing everything half wrong! (which is normal, trust me)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Practice does not make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect. 

I agree with the comments about doing some good conditioning, including rope skipping and road work, then finding a qualified instructor when ready.

 

One of our MMA fighters had a cage fight scheduled a few years back, his opponent was claimed "self trained", fight lasted about 37 seconds. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check out clubs at your school. I found a great Arnis group that met several times a week and was free for students. There are often Tai Chi groups.

Meetup.com, too.

May not have exactly the one you are looking for, but camaraderie, instruction (hopefully quality), and a chance to check out different arts.

Beats trying to do it by yourself and developing bad habits. There's a lot of junk on YouTube and even if you can identify quality videos, it's extremely hard to learn on your own and not develop bad habits.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of dojos offer a free trial class where they'll let you take a class for free. Before you sign up for something, don't hesitate to shop around. I went to several classes before finding one that worked for me. Just be careful, they might try to strong arm you into paying as soon as it's done. Say you're looking for the right school for you right now and if they get aggressive after that it's probably not a good school anyway.

 

Aaaaaaaand I may have signed up for a free trial class every now and then on a free afternoon even though I was already enlisted in a dojo and it was just an off day. Don't judge me  :playful:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

conditioning 100% ..... get a heavy bag, keep your hands up and just do combos on it.

 

if nothing else it will make 3 minutes of hitting something hard whilst keeping your guard up, not feel like hell. .... its basic endurance for your arms

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I heard conditioning a lot. Everyone probably has a different definition of what "conditioning" is. Anybody care to elaborate on what they mean?

 

 

 

I've also done the trial classes strategy for a few months, where I signed up for every trial class in every martial arts gym within two hours from where I lived. That's when your desire to train overcomes your pride, and you'd rather be judged by society as being 'a shameless freeloader' than by yourself as being 'untrained'. There are many ways to train; getting some formal, credible instruction just happens to be the best method by far.

 

Ultimately, like many things in life, it all boils down to how badly you want to train. Not to be a dick (I know nothing about your situation), but I've heard the "I can't afford to train" justification way too many times, from people who were better-off financially than I was. (I lived in a country where 30% of the population lived below the poverty line.) Not that there's anything wrong with it; they have their priorities in order, training just doesn't happen to be high up there. There's no shame in saying that one is not willing to do what it takes to be the best martial artist one can be; it's definitely not for everyone. The shame is in giving up and telling oneself (and others) that nothing can be done.

 

 

If your priority is to be the best martial artist you can be, I'd suggest finding a way to get in a dojo. My old sparring partners traveled to the city and worked as janitors for the boxing gym for 3+ years, eventually turning pro. I also had a teammate in MMA who was a physical therapy student with a 60-90 minute commute who found a way to spend 4-6 hours in the gym almost every day for 2 years. He also went pro. If you have other priorities, you could probably take care of the other ones until you have the time and money to train. Me, I don't train right now, because I'm unemployed and I want to deadlift 400 and do a planche, even though it has little carryover to my fighting ability. I could find a way if I wanted to. I guess I don't want to. Priorities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I heard conditioning a lot. Everyone probably has a different definition of what "conditioning" is. Anybody care to elaborate on what they mean?

 

I've also done the trial classes strategy for a few months, where I signed up for every trial class in every martial arts gym within two hours from where I lived. That's when your desire to train overcomes your pride, and you'd rather be judged by society as being 'a shameless freeloader' than by yourself as being 'untrained'. There are many ways to train; getting some formal, credible instruction just happens to be the best method by far.

 

To me conditioning means preparing your body to take a high volume of training and sparring when the time comes. Lots of skipping rope, punching / kicking bags, push ups, sit ups, chin ups, getting power in simple strikes and getting stronger from it. When I was a white belt I had been spending a large amount of time on running and skipping rope so I was able to run circles around this one brown belt who'd taken a break for two years and let his health go. He had better form and knew the techniques, but he was getting tired halfway through class while I was taking two classes back to back. Who do you think was getting more out of the training?

 

And you're right about "can't afford to train" justification being bull in a lot of cases. In addition to being great for body, mind, and soul, martial arts is also a great for wallet. Most good dojos run $100 - $150 a month and offer classes every day and nearly every night plus they usually have gym. That's much cheaper than going out to concerts, grabbing drinks with friends, or heading to the movies. It'll get you active in a social environment and help ya make friends too. Assuming you have a job and not taking care of somebody with a serious medical condition, 9 times out of 10 you can take a good hard look at your finances and find some vices you can cut out to make room ( I once met a guy who said he couldn't afford to go to a dojo while lighting up a cigarette and I rolled my eyes).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Practice does not make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect. 

 

I'd respectfully disagree.  Contrary to popular belief, practice does not make perfect. Practice makes permanent.  Practicing something wrong will not make it right [perfect].  But it will permanently ingrain that wrong practice into your head.  

 

You can get some basics from youtube, though even then I'd highly recommend recording your practice sessions and having an instructor watch them to correct any issues.  This is what I do with TPLA, and it works surprisingly well.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guys here are pretty much right. I would put a lot of focus on mental aspect of training if you want to do it to defend yourself. I'm not all into perfect technique as my success in martial arts comes from being unorthodox. But in 99 percent of cases the perfect technique is important

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well first, saying you want to learn a martial art is like saying you're hungry, or you want to listen to some music.  You need to be specific about what you want to focus on.  Are you interested in fighting for sport, or self defense?  Do you want to focus on striking?  If so, are you mainly interested in just punches and kicks, or do you want more variety with knees, elbows, and wrists?  Do you want to work with weapons?  If so, which ones?  How about grappling, or joint manipulation?  And if that question seems a little too daunting, consider this:  What are some of your favorite action movie scenes?  Who are some of your favorite action movie stars?  How do they attack/defend themselves?  Granted that movies are choreographed with sets and props, but this will be a good jumping off point to start from.

Second, yeah conditioning is important, in strength, flexibility, and endurance.  Although, depending on which discipline you choose, one of these will probably become more important than the others.  You could be as strong as an ox, but if you don't know how to throw a punch, all that extra mass won't matter too much if you're technique is sloppy.  Also, I've found that when it comes to martial arts, the discipline conditions the student, not the other way around.  No one punches themselves in the face to become a boxer  :tongue:

Third, if learning a martial art is important to you, then you find a way to make it work, regardless of time and money.  Find local schools in your area, and see if they offer free introductory classes.  Even if they don't, most schools will allow potential students to observe the class while it's in session to see if they like it (though check with the instructor first).

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have yet to meet a teacher who was not interested in bringing in motivated students.   Money is not the only coin you have to spend.  I have traded motorcycle maintenance and drywalling for training,  and I have dojo brothers who have traded cleaning services,  front desk time,  and other skills for instruction.  

 

But in all cases,  the student is motivated to pay with time and skills.  And you have to talk to the instructors openly about your situation.

 

How badly do you want to train? 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Didn't see it mentioned, the 

college you are attending may 

offer a martial arts class. When I was in college there were a couple of general karate classes and a Tai Chi class. 

 

They may not be very advanced or teach exactly what you are looking for, but may be worth checking into. 

 

Oops. Didn't realize this was a resurrected thread. 

Edited by MarekBoone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.