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so, do most people around here buy into paleo?


What do you think of the Paleo Diet?  

99 members have voted

  1. 1. What do you think of the Paleo Diet?

    • I'm hardcore Paleo!
      23
    • I've taken some of the suggestions but not all.
      56
    • I've modified my diet but not necessarily to be more Paleo.
      13
    • I don't buy the Paleo thing.
      7


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i'm pretty new to the site (joined a few weeks ago but have only been by a few times). tonight i decided to log on and try and figure out some of the technical issues i had been having. now that some of that is done, i wanted to ask whether those of us not so keen on the whole paleo thing fit in here. i mostly use a site called sparkpeople.com for weight-loss/health stuff. i track my food and exercise there, write and read blogs, read articles, do their exercise videos, etc. and, i haven't really heard anything from them about the paleo diet...which makes me curious. i read the initial article this site sent me about it. and it has some valid points. but some other aspects leave me with more questions. so, i need to do more research, obviously. but i figured, before i start getting all post-happy here i should know where people are coming from. is this site geared strongly for those who want to change to a paleo diet? or is there room for those of us that are leaning more toward just making healthy choices and eating the less-than-healthy stuff in moderation?

thanks!

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I think that there's room to go both sides of the spectrum. That being said, if you have food allergies, an auto-immune disease, are at risk for a metabolic condition, or trying to lean out/stabilize at a certain weight, I would certainly recommend it. If you're unsure, try it for 30-60 days and decide whether or not you want this. *this* being paleo. As far as what you decide, it might sound weird, but I really really don't care. You are allowed to make your own logical decisions as to what to eat. You are allowed to succeed, to fail, and to make goals, and make progress. Whether you do paleo or not, I'm excited if you level up your life. That's what I'm interested in seeing.

For me, I dropped my fasting glucose levels, reversed my metabolic condition, got rid of my sleep apnea, hay fever, and have managed to drop a lot of weight and increased my efficiency at crossfit. I'm not planning on going back. Of course, I have an incentive in that I have a wicked gluten allergy and sugar/dairy causes me to break out in acne. So eating a standard american diet doesn't cut it for me.

Here's my go-to, how to try paleo guides. To note, paleo can mean different things. So allow for different meanings of the word, in terms of starches/dairy/fat allowed.

http://robbwolf.com/2011/09/29/what-is-the-paleo-diet/

http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

http://whole9life.com/2011/06/whole-30-v4/

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I had a whole long drawn-out reply typed up but then I erased it. Anger.

Anyway, I kind of feel that way too -- really, it's been the reason I haven't been more active on the fora, because I feel like if I don't subscribe to the notion that Paleo is the One True Path to Fitness, that I automatically am unwelcome. To be honest, for me, Paleo would be cutting out every single thing I even remotely enjoy. It's not that I subsist off of ice cream and Mountain Dew, but I've ... just never been a meat lover. I was vegetarian for awhile but gave it up because I realized I wasn't being very healthy about it, and I do try to get as much protein as I can, but to cut out grains and legumes entirely -- I just feel like life is too damned short. I can think of very few things that are more depressing than the idea of eating nothing but meat and a restricted selection of vegetables for the rest of my life. Please understand, I don't advocate living off of pizza and ice cream, either, but I think as long as you're sane about it and avoid overly processed foods and added sugars, eating whole grain bread and black beans isn't going to kill your fitness efforts.

I won't deny that Paleo is probably a very healthy diet for many people, and I've known personally people who've been very successful with it. But for me, it just wouldn't be sustainable, and I do believe that it is possible to get fit without it. Advocates of the diet also tend to oversimplify things and gloss over the 10,000+ years between the start of the agricultural revolution and the beginning of when obesity started to be a problem, but that's a rant for another day.

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i'm your typical 80/20'er probably, been a bit more strict during this 6 week challenge but i don't feel deprived in any way, i had a full carvery and treacle sponge and ice cream on sunday for example. I used to HAVE to eat every 2 hours, sometimes less, but since going paleo i can even intermittent fast and can go for hours after eating a god ol' paleo meal, ive even got a bit more ripped in the last few weeks, my major lifts have gone up in that time (clean, clean and press and deadlift mostly) despite having a hip injury that prevents me squatting so all in all i'm pretty happy with it

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I've heard a lot of good things about paleo, but like you, I'm still a bit dubious. There's definitely something to be said about reducing carbohydrate intake, mainly as it's a large source of easily consumed calories, but the idea of cutting out a whole food group never sat well with me. Personally, I think the key is moderation and just not going crazy on the stuff that you know is bad for you, like sugary treats and extra large pizzas. I'd like to see some more non-paleo discussion personally, but as I'm happy with my food intake it doesn't really phase me much...

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I was actually a little apprehensive about spending a lot of time on this forum at first because of the heavy emphasis on paleo. You don't hear a lot of paleo-advocates talking about the potential health problems associated with a diet that places such a large emphasis on meats (I'm not a vegetarian. Far from it. But you can still do serious damage to your arteries even if your body fat is <15% and you "look" healthy).

And I second Demonslayer: the rise in obesity is not due to a shift towards an agrarian diet.

Best tip the paleo diet offers is to eliminate as many processed foods as possible. But legumes, grains, and dairy? Well, paleo's just not a be all, end all solution for health-conscious eaters, IMO.

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hey guys - I love paleo but am actually a bit upset that I'm seeing that non paleo'ers dont feel welcome.

Ive been kind of keeping in the background planning some forum changes, etc from the feedback y'all gave me on the last survey - so I haven't been able to be as active as I'd like on the actual reading and posting side.

if you could, please send me a pm, or an email to contact@nerdfitness.com with any reasons why you feel that its anti non paleo friendly or any other ideas you have to make it seem more welcoming to non paleo'ers.

I'll look around a bit later and see what I can find on my own too :)

I want everyone to feel welcome and happy here regardless of their diet choices.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I feel like the reason so many people here are interested in Paleo is that it goes right along with the nerd part of the site and the nerds of old i.e. it questions conventional wisdom, like when the assertion was made that the earth revolved around the sun, not the other way around. The willingness to try something new and see how you feel is a big part of succeeding in anything. I personally dropped weight effortlessly (30 lbs in a semester's time) and added muscle mass when I first went paleo.

That being said, the fitness part of this site involves more than just your diet. It's also about how you exercise and how you feel mentally. So if you can't or won't commit to paleo, you'll still find plenty of resources around here to help you reach your fitness goals. Don't feel alienated just because you disagree with what may seem like a majority here: disagreement with the ideas of the majority often initiates the best discussions.

-Phil

Sent from my SPH-D700 using Tapatalk

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I can respect everything Paleo brings to the table, but I am by no means a paleo person myself. Yeah, there can be a certain...evengelistic bent towards that sort of diet at times, but, really, it's just because someone has found something that they feel has made their life better, and want other people's lives to be better, too.

But yes, there are indeed a lot of us that are not paleo, so please, deamonslayer and t.bombidil, stick around!

You both might like this little blog post, which is more in line with my philosophy of eating:

http://bradpilon.com/weight-loss/forks-over-knives/

I doubt we’ll ever admit that it is our rampant out-of-control consumerism that leads to obesity and disease. Or that a large part of the success of our media-driven food economy is based on the absolute need to exploit the human body’s amazing ability to consume far more than it should without breaking down (in the short term anyways).

So while Paleo people will espouse the benefits of Meat and Fat, Vegetarians will espouse the benefits of Fruits and Vegetables (and grains sometimes), and still others will espouse all the other crazy diet beliefs in between, it is kind of cool that we can sit back and watch with an understanding that they are all ‘mostly right’ and have a lot to share to advance Nutrition as a science.

In fact, in my opinion the dividing line between them is only really visible at the extreme ends – when they start pointing fingers at what they believe to be the End-All-Be-All of dietary evils.

In other words, while everyone battles it out, I’ll be right here, not stressing, and sticking with the same mantra that has been in Eat Stop Eat since it’s first draft in 2006:

Eat less, while enjoying the foods you eat. Eat lots of fruits and vegetables, and lots of herbs and spices. And maybe most importantly, spend less time stressing over the types of food you are eating.

Of course, ‘lots’ is a pretty subjective word, so it could be expanded to be “choose fruits and vegetables when possible” and “experiment with herbs and spices”.

Other than that just apply a little common sense. A donut a day is fine in my books. A box of donuts – not so much

Stick around, guys! You can likely learn a lot from the paleo diet, even if you don't fully try it out. I know I have!

:)

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As someone new to paleo and figuring it all out, I'm probably contributing to all of the paleo-paleo-paleo noise around here with all of my questions.

But please don't run away! Come! Sit down! Have a very-non-paleo chocolate coffee scone and chat with us!

Posted Image

(This is the recipe and if you aren't eating paleo, you should be making these right away! :D )

I've been living paleo for a few weeks and non-paleo for a few years, so if anyone has any non-paleo-related food questions I'm super happy (and probably much better equipped!) to answer them. Need oatmeal topping inspirations? Hit me up. Interested in making a vegetarian daal? I've got about a dozen bookmarked.

<3!

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I wouldn't say I buy into it since I am not strictly Paleo/Primal as some people. I just try to eat less processed foods and do more healthy cooking. Not everyone is Paleo but it gets a lot of traffic on the stie because there are many who have had success with it and are sharing their results with the forum. We definitely do not want to alienate people because we are all in this journey together, no matter how we get there.

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I'm glad you posted this thread! And I'm glad for the responses. I hope that more non paleo folks will come out of the wood work and join the discussions. I think Dawsy summed up my position perfectly.

That being said.. when I first got into the forums I was a little worried, too. But I've been around a few months and am pretty dang active. I have never felt unwelcome by anyone-not even the most zealous paleo folks. This site and these forums are so full of great information that it would be a shame not to participate. I generally just skim over the paleo discussions and go for what I'm really interested in. There are also some great links and threads for non paleo information (I believe nomeatathlete.com is referenced here a bit).

So, fear not fellow non paleo eaters! Join the fun!

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I went paleo for a few weeks, lost a lot of fat. I was training myself to burn energy correctly again. Right now I just eating the healthy, natural stuff. Staying away from the processed stuff. I am sure that I will go back into again soon, to change rapid growth. Right now I am happy with my levels and I am trying to avoid the leveling off that comes with any fitness change regime.

My advice, use your head. If the thought I should not eat this comes into mind, do not eat it.

Im looking forward to my homemade sweet potato, regular potato and bean soup. There are some other things in there, but I am not sure. (It is far from paleo, but still healthy)

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wow! thank you guys for all the thoughts/support/etc. i feel much more comfortable now knowing that i am not alone. personally, for me, i'm a carb addict. i know this. i ate a bowl of soup in a bread bowl once and, there and then, i decided that, if it was possible to eat all of my meals off dishes made of bread, that was the life i wanted. lol. that being said, i know that's not the best course of action. and, since tracking my calories and such, i've realized (as someone said earlier), carbs are just not the biggest "bang for the buck." veggies, fruits, meats really provide much more...lasting energy. i eat a roll, i'm still hungry, i eat a piece of chicken, i'm good. but i'm not ready to cut things out entirely. i know paleo deals alot with the agricultural revolution but i guess i feel like, if grains grow in the ground, they are basically a vegetable...and are natural. and, thus, are ok. this is also why i never bought into the low-carb diet craze a few years ago. not because of the cutting out bread, really. but the idea that certain FRUITS AND VEGETABLES were off limits. that just never made sense to me. a friend did the low carb thing and had alot of success. but i offered him a juicy apple and he looked at me like i was offering him an ice cream sundae. yes, he lost alot of weight but i don't think it was due to low-carb (he'd disagree with me). it was because he stopped eating junk food. he stopped eating half a loaf of bread at a time, stopped eating pizza, stopped eating fast food.

ok, i'm rambling. but i guess the points i'm trying to make are:

1) nerds have the infamy of not being the most healthy bunch. i watch my bf play dnd and his group demolishes 24 cans of soda in an afternoon. it seems to me that the paleo thing requires a huge change in someone's life. no more pizza. no more mountain dew. is this really sustainable? is this really something someone can do for the next 50+ years?

2) i think the thing with diet is to figure out your strengths and weaknesses. what do you do well and where do you fall down? and work on those things. for me, it's been reducing the carbs i eat, trying to keep my sweet tooth in check, and not snacking (as much) at night. but i love fruits and veggies. so it's a balancing act. if we each find a diet that works for us (and by diet i really mean lifestyle) then we can make those changes that will sustain us into old age and help us lead a healthy lifestyle for years to come.

3) lastly, an issue i have not seen addressed here yet (though maybe i've missed it) is the issue of emotional eating which i think is a huge issue for so many people. personally, when i get bored, i want a snack. not because i'm hungry but because the simple act of eating is comforting. when i have a bad day, i'm more likely to say "screw being healthy" and hit up the drive through. i doubt i'm alone in this. and a simple diet change doesn't fix those triggers.

anyway, i'm done rambling. sorry if it was incoherrent. but i really feel good hearing from so many folks. thanks guys!

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If you recognize there are things you want to change about your eating habits, that's great. For some people it works really well to dive right in. For most, it doesn't. Make small, manageable goals for yourself (that's where the forum challenges are really helpful-you should join in on the next one) like cutting out soda. Or only eating bread once a day or getting significant protein in each meal, etc. Take it step by step, hang around, do your research and you will be surprised at how far you come.

Same for emotional eating...you recognize it now make small goals to help address it.

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I can respect everything Paleo brings to the table, but I am by no means a paleo person myself. Yeah, there can be a certain...evengelistic bent towards that sort of diet at times, but, really, it's just because someone has found something that they feel has made their life better, and want other people's lives to be better, too.

But yes, there are indeed a lot of us that are not paleo, so please, deamonslayer and t.bombidil, stick around!

You both might like this little blog post, which is more in line with my philosophy of eating:

http://bradpilon.com/weight-loss/forks-over-knives/

I doubt we’ll ever admit that it is our rampant out-of-control consumerism that leads to obesity and disease. Or that a large part of the success of our media-driven food economy is based on the absolute need to exploit the human body’s amazing ability to consume far more than it should without breaking down (in the short term anyways).

So while Paleo people will espouse the benefits of Meat and Fat, Vegetarians will espouse the benefits of Fruits and Vegetables (and grains sometimes), and still others will espouse all the other crazy diet beliefs in between, it is kind of cool that we can sit back and watch with an understanding that they are all ‘mostly right’ and have a lot to share to advance Nutrition as a science.

In fact, in my opinion the dividing line between them is only really visible at the extreme ends – when they start pointing fingers at what they believe to be the End-All-Be-All of dietary evils.

In other words, while everyone battles it out, I’ll be right here, not stressing, and sticking with the same mantra that has been in Eat Stop Eat since it’s first draft in 2006:

Eat less, while enjoying the foods you eat. Eat lots of fruits and vegetables, and lots of herbs and spices. And maybe most importantly, spend less time stressing over the types of food you are eating.

Of course, ‘lots’ is a pretty subjective word, so it could be expanded to be “choose fruits and vegetables when possible” and “experiment with herbs and spices”.

Other than that just apply a little common sense. A donut a day is fine in my books. A box of donuts – not so much

Stick around, guys! You can likely learn a lot from the paleo diet, even if you don't fully try it out. I know I have!

:)

Word. I couldn't have said it better. And really, I'm not so much about "pushing paleo" as I am anti-scale, anti-junk food, and pro-powerlifting/crossfit.

Whether you're eating a standard american diet, vegetarian, vegan or paleo/primal, I think there's a lot that we can offer each other that goes beyond our food choices.

If that's what is dividing the board, then I'm a bit worried for our future. I'm more than able to go post over on Mark's daily apple or paleohacks if all I want is paleo suggestions for how to do stuff. But they don't level up their life in ways that I see here everyday.

I really really want to stress this. I have nothing against anyone's diet. But if you ask for advice on how to do "something", I'm probably going to suggest something I believe works. But other than that? I'm not worried about it.

Life is too short to worry about anything except what makes you happy. If you're cool with your progress, with how you're feeling, and how it makes you better, and level up your life, I'm happy with that. :D

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When I first joined, I felt the same way... and sometimes it feels like the answer to every question thread is "Eat more bacon." which isn't always that helpful or insightful.

I've begun leaning towards paleo/primal in that I have been avoiding grains and sugars and carbs in general... but I'll never go completely all out. In my opinion, it's about combining the healthy options that work and are sustainable for you.

I've personally been eating what I consider healthy and wholesome for a few years, and I have no (and have never had) health problems (other than a bit more body fat than I'd like to see!) So I really have no motivation to completely overhaul my diet. Tweaks here and there, but I'm not going to fix what's not broken. ;)

ebm1224, re: emotional eating:

You're right, it's not talked about that much. Usually the blame is put on our hormones and insulin levels for why we eat too much. But I know being bored is a huge contribution to why I've overeaten in the past. My solution has been to keep food away from me, make it inaccessible. If I'm really craving ice cream, I will go out and buy a small ice cream cone. It's more expensive, but if I have a tub of ice cream in my freezer... well, it won't be there for long. ;) As for eating out, I'm pretty cheap and since my attitude has started leaning towards eating foods that I know their exact contents, it's just not appealing to me usually. I'm not sure if that helps you, but that's what's worked for me!

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I haven't been able to read every post here... But to the op,

This forum is geared towards all nerds... Scratch that, ANYONE who want to level up your lives. What I love most is that everyone here is so accepting. Yes, Steve Kamb supports paleo... but that doesn't mean you have to be.

Do I think it's the best way of living/eating? Yeah. But I'm still going to support your fitness no matter what diet you choose.

The best diet and exercise is the ones you'll actually do (mostly).

-LW

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i wanted to ask whether those of us not so keen on the whole paleo thing fit in here.

before i start getting all post-happy here i should know where people are coming from. is this site geared strongly for those who want to change to a paleo diet? or is there room for those of us that are leaning more toward just making healthy choices and eating the less-than-healthy stuff in moderation?

thanks!

Anyway, I kind of feel that way too -- really, it's been the reason I haven't been more active on the fora, because I feel like if I don't subscribe to the notion that Paleo is the One True Path to Fitness, that I automatically am unwelcome.

hey guys - I love paleo but am actually a bit upset that I'm seeing that non paleo'ers dont feel welcome.

When I first joined, I felt the same way... and sometimes it feels like the answer to every question thread is "Eat more bacon." which isn't always that helpful or insightful.

The loudest voices on NF are pro-paleo, pro-vibrams, and pro-Taubes (and unfortunately, we have people on this board that will vehemently disagree with you if you aren't behind these...this is the internet, after all). The thing that all of these things have in common is that they are intuitive.

It makes "sense" that you should eat natural, non-processed food, that humans developed long before shoes were invented, and that Carbs are evil. Heck, the other daysome nutjob with 5 posts so far made one that said that counting calories doesn't work and wasn't supported by science.

Making improvements to your health starts and ends with examining what you are eating and ensuring that you are eating the right foods in the right amounts. Any diet that puts your focus on this will be successful. I lost 160lbs in a year by eating pizza from gas stations, drinking 4 or 5 diet sodas a day, and slamming carbs (through fiber) like there was no tomorrow. I also saw my back squat go from barely able to do 10 reps with the bar to 405lbs.

Everyone is welcome here - my personal method was counting calories. Others find success losing weight by going low-carb or paleo (which, coincidently, causes a calorie deficit because you are cutting out high-calorie carbs or processed foods and replacing them with protein or vegetables that are harder to gorge on).

Everyone's journey will be different. As I said at the beginning, the loudest voices (i.e. the biggest threads) will attract a lot of attention. But there are lot of different perspectives here if you look around.

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Great discussion! Good to see people are thinking carefully about this stuff.

I must admit when I first read about Paleo I fell under the spell, I thought it was all common sense and matched the way I thought about food. Reading more into it though I started to find some logical flaws around the edges. I totally agree with cutting down on processed foods and empty carbs like white pasta. However I'm much better off if I can add a bowl of peas in here or some peanuts there. Anyway, my sentiments match those of many up here already.

Make healthy choices but don't stress out about it and you're already doing better than the majority of people out there. The most fit and healthy eating among us can still be struck down by modern life.

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Great discussion! Good to see people are thinking carefully about this stuff.

I must admit when I first read about Paleo I fell under the spell, I thought it was all common sense and matched the way I thought about food. Reading more into it though I started to find some logical flaws around the edges. I totally agree with cutting down on processed foods and empty carbs like white pasta. However I'm much better off if I can add a bowl of peas in here or some peanuts there. Anyway, my sentiments match those of many up here already.

Make healthy choices but don't stress out about it and you're already doing better than the majority of people out there. The most fit and healthy eating among us can still be struck down by modern life.

Yeah, there are some flaws. I have no issues with high fat dairy, or with saturated fat that many people seem to have an issue with (the beginnings of paleo are much different than most of the stuff coming along now. Still an emerging field of work). There seems to be an evolving shift to accept certain things, and I'm beginning to see that primal is more of an accepted and workable approach than paleo (in most cases). If you actually drill down into the science, and pay attention to Mat Lalonde's work (biochemist), he's poked holes in a bunch of stuff about anti-nutrients and some other stuff. I know that he has a video from the ancestral health foundation that has some interesting stuff.

I find that Kurt Harris has a reasonable logic system for eating in ways that doesn't destroy your body, but that's just my take on it. His "getting started guide" is probably my favorite take on eating in a paleo-like fashion. http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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I'm probably considered one of the people who is not very supportive. My own bias is that I don't really care what you eat, I am far from paleo myself, as long as you don't try to make claims that are inaccurate (vegan is long term healthy, vegetarian is long term more sustainable than omnivorous and other personal hot buttons, ) I eat pizza peanuts, drink beer and wine regularly (as in it's not a dinner without an beer or wine included) and eat dairy. Rice is a comfort food and we usually have rice 3-4 times a week. I also eat 95% grass finished ruminants, raise or hunt 95% of my own meat, produce all my eggs, all my chicken and trade for veges from local farmers. I also don't eat much of any seafood or fishes of any sort. Last time I had fish was at least 8 years ago.

OTOH everyone is entitled to an opinion and to doing what they see fit. I do see that paleo is more likely to be thriving as opposed to just surviving for more people than most other type of diets.

I'd love to go full on hardcore paleo for 30 days but will need to schedule it, as I know that will be a huge change. Jsut he avoiding beer will be very hard. So 'm backing into more paleo but keeping my beer and wine. :-)

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I dunno. I like the idea, but the implementation turns out to be expensive and hassle (which might just be the way I manage time but hey) - I lose my bike mojo on paleo, even when I try to make up carbs.

One thing I really do like from paleo is that it's an easy way to do a wheat exclusion. That means a bread-cakes-and-cookies exclusion, and those are my worst hollow calories. Oh, and the wonderful bacon and melon salad. I'll take that one to the grave :)

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I don't buy that something coming from a machine is any worse for you than something mother nature made. Mother nature makes all sorts of stuff you shouldn't eat! Machines make all sorts of things that make my life pretty spiffy. Also the dosage makes the poison.

In the last couple months of working turning around my weight and health here is what I have learned and come to believe:

  • Liquid Calories are really bad. Too often they are "empty calories" that convert quickly to fat and don't satiate your appetite as much as solid food.

  • Sugar and simple starches are the next two highest items on the hierarchy of "stuff that's bad for you."

  • Controlling starchy carbs (and indirectly calories) is important. Most successful weight control diets keep portions under control and favor the more complex starches (Yams, Brown Rice, Whole Grain bread.)

  • People's tolerance for starch varies depending on activity level and metabolism. Some folks need to cut the starch much more aggressively than others.

  • Fat has gotten a worse rap than it deserves. The act of eating fat alone probably won't make you fat. Not eating enough fat is probably bad for your brain. Fat substitutes (margarine, canola oil, etc.) are probably worse for you than the stuff they replace. Food like bacon, dark chicken meat, marbled red meat, etc. has probably gotten a worse rap than they deserve. That said, I'm not about to down a stick of butter!

  • The diet our government recommends (and most Americans eat) has too much starch and not enough protein.

  • Eat the bun, pass on the fries. Go nuts on salad, pass on the bread sticks.

  • It doesn't matter much how often you eat, but eating planned meals more often does help control hunger and portions.

  • Who the fuck knows what all our body really needs beyond a few guidelines. Eat a bunch of different stuff and mix it up. Great food is one of life's joys.

I'm 6'0" and in under 2 months I've gone from around 220lbs to around 205lbs (and counting) while making progress on my big lifts. I've been able to do this with some simple adjustments to diet, strength training 3x/week and a little cardio when I can find the time. Nothing crazy or radical.

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It's good to see this thread, actually, and the considered replies. I must admit, I took a bit of time to sign up to these fora as well. Still, there does seem to be a load of well-informed, good-meaning people here who, collectively, know more than I ever will. And I don't think there's ever any sense of pressure to do anything - just suggestions and ideas based on what people have found useful.

I look at it this way - I eat, generally, whatever I could in theory have picked from a tree or bush (nuts, berries, fruit), dug out of the ground (vegetables, tubers), collected from an animal (eggs, milk), or beaten to death.

I do literally do some of these things (growing own veg, keeping own chickens), and don't literally do others (beating cows to death is harder and messier than going to the butcher, for example). I do eat bread from time to time and I have got past the stage where I felt bad eating a muffin, a donut, or a piece of cake. I don't eat anything that's been anywhere near a lab (if the words 'processed', 'modified', 'hydrogenated' or 'partially' appear on the ingredients list I give it a miss), for two simple reasons - it's not neceassary, because there's always a natural equivalent, and it tastes better to eat the natural stuff anyway.

At the end of the day, it's whatever works best for you, not for anyone else. If you're happy and healthy then who cares what anyone else advises?

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